Microscope and Cell Theory Development

  • Period: Jan 1, 962 to

    Microscope and Cell Theory Development

  • Jan 1, 1214

    (Miscroscopes) The first lenses

    (Miscroscopes) The first lenses
    The first lenses were orignally made for eyeglasses by Roger Bacon (a monk in Oxford), who was born in 1214. He knew a lot about lenses, but the type of lenses he used and talked about were an earlier version of reading glasses.
  • Jan 1, 1285

    (Microscope) The first eye glasses

    (Microscope) The first eye glasses
    There are many who claim that they knew how to make spectacles, though the only way we know this is through inscriptions on their graves. For example: Salvano d'Aramento degli Amati - a nobleman of Florence - had an ingravement that he had invented spectacles, but had kept it secret so no one would steal the process.
  • Zacharias Jansen Invents the Microscope

    Zacharias Jansen Invents the Microscope
    Zacharias Jansen (a dutch eyeglass maker) and his father, Hans Jansen, created the first compound microscope in 1590. It was a crude version of the kind that we have today, with un-expertly cut lenses as well as blurry images. There was barely any adjustment, as well, making it much harder to get an accurate image.
  • (Cell Theory) Anton van Leeuwenhoek born

    (Cell Theory) Anton van Leeuwenhoek born
    Anoton van Leewenhoek was born on October 24, 1632. Later on in life, he learns how to improve lense-grinding, so as to improve microscopic visibitily issues.
  • (Cell Theory) Robert Hooke Born

    (Cell Theory) Robert Hooke Born
    Rober Hooke - Anton van Leeuwenhooek's contemporary - was born on July 28, 1635.
  • (Cell theory/Microscopes) Cork cell studies

    (Cell theory/Microscopes) Cork cell studies
    Robert Hooke claimed to have studied "small animals" (bacteria and protozoa) under a microscope. He published this in his book, "Micrographia," in 1665. In this book, he drew thirty-eight drawings of objects through his microscope, up close. His drawing of cork is the most famous out of all. (30X lense power)
  • Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek confirmed bacterial life

    Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek confirmed bacterial life
    Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek confirmed bacterial life in 1678, where upon society asked Hooke to confirm. He did. He was able to do this because he had improved the magnification of the lenses to 300X.
  • (Microscope) Van Leeuwenhoek invented his microscope

    (Microscope) Van Leeuwenhoek invented his microscope
    Because he was so intruiged by the idea of these "little animals" (protozoa and bacteria,) Antoni van Leevenhook invented his microscope. In order to use it, one must place a small object on top of the tip of the needle, before carefully zooming in and out to adjust the veiw.
  • (Cell Theory) Cells are acknowledged as the basic units of life

    It took until 1839 for cells to be acknowledged as the basic building blocks of life - that means it took nearly two centuries!
  • (Cell Theory) Thoedore Shwann and Matthias Schledein propose the "Cell Theory"

    (Cell Theory) Thoedore Shwann and Matthias Schledein propose the "Cell Theory"
    Theodor Shwann and Matthias Scheleiden formally propose the "Cell Theory," which was the theory that cells were the basic building block of life.
  • (Microscope) Lenses for microscopes became more efficient

    (Microscope) Lenses for microscopes became more efficient
    Because lenses used to be so hard to create, the lenses of microscopes were usually not very well carved and sometimes would distort the image. However, thanks to Hugh Powell and many of the others who helped to fabricate the microscope lenses, it was decided that production would continue in Germany, where it was easier to fabricate the lenses properly.
  • Invention of the electron microscope

    Invention of the electron microscope
    It was invented by two german inventors, Max Knoll and Ernest Ruska in 1930. It speeds particles up until their wavelength is extremely short. Then, a beam of light is shot onto the electrons so as to form an image on an electronic, photographic plate.
  • (Microscope) Zernike invents the phase contrast microscope

    (Microscope) Zernike invents the phase contrast microscope
    Many advancements were made to the microscope, and eventually, Zernike invented a microscope called the phase contrast microscope. It is used to examine specimins such as biological tissue - which wasn't able to be seen without a contrast microscope.
  • Schools study using microscopes

    Schools study using microscopes
    In schools today, we are allowed to use microscopes (both compund and phase contrast microscopes) to conduct research on small objects and record their details.