British festivals

LINEA DEL TEMPO SU BRITISH FESTIVALS

By Rosy58
  • NEW YEAR'S DAY

    NEW YEAR'S DAY
    The night before New Year's Day, many British citizens watch as the clock tower's minute hand finally reaches midnight. At this time, Big Ben (the bell) rings in the new year.
    Many people celebrate either by having parties at home or by going out to pubs and partying with friends. In Scotland, it is a common tradition to sing "Auld Lang Syne" at midnight to bring in the new year.
  • PANCAKE DAY

    PANCAKE DAY
    Many celebrate Shrove Tuesday by eating pancakes, as they contain many ingredients that are inappropriate for lent (a time of the year during which many Christians abstain from certain luxuries and indulgences). Some communities hold "pancake races," in which people run a distance while flipping pancakes in a frying pan. In order to win, contestants must cross the finish line as quickly as possible without burning (or dropping) breakfast
  • EASTER

    EASTER
    Many people go to church on Easter Sunday to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Modern celebrations also often include decorating eggs and holding Easter egg hunts, during which eggs are hidden for children (and playful adults) to find.
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    BRITISH FESTIVALS

    Here are the most famous festivals celebrated in Great Britain
  • VALENTINE DAY

    VALENTINE DAY
    In the UK, couples often celebrate Valentine's Day by giving gifts to one another and writing verses of love to be published in newspapers or magazines. Many couples also spend the evening celebrating with a special meal. Occasionally, children send valentines to one another to celebrate friendship.
  • APRIL FOOLS DAY

    APRIL FOOLS DAY
    Much like in other countries, April Fool's Day in the UK is an occasion when it is socially acceptable for people to play practical jokes on one another.
  • HALLOWEEN

    HALLOWEEN
    Much like in the United States, people dress up, bob for apples, and have bonfires on Halloween night. Many attend themed parties, and children occasionally go trick-or-treating. While the modern tradition of trick-or-treating began elsewhere, many assert that Halloween itself has British origins
  • GUY FAWKES DAY

    GUY FAWKES DAY
    Bonfire Night is an annual celebration of the failure of the "gunpowder plot," an attempt to blow up the house of Parliament in 1605. Fireworks are lit at night, and many families also create effigies of Guy Fawkes and burn them in bonfires either in their own back yards or with other members of the community. Since the day is so close to Halloween, many combine the two holidays—some even wear Guy Fawkes masks as Halloween costumes.
  • CHRISTMAS

    CHRISTMAS
    Christmas in the UK is typically celebrated by giving gifts to friends and family and attending a special service at church. Many celebrate the tradition of "Father Christmas" by giving gifts that he delivered during the night. Some families also share in a Christmas feast that involves ham, minced pies, and Yorkshire pudding
    At the beginning of the meal, each member of the family crosses arms, and together, they pull Christmas poppers that produce paper hats worn through the meal.