Humanities Timeline 1970's

By sfon225
  • Period: to

    1970's to 1979's

  • First Earth Day

    First Earth Day
    “The first Earth Day was organized by Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin on April 22, 1970. More than 20 million people took part in events - listening to speeches, holding seminars, and taking practical action to clean up the environment. Earth Day, event first observed internationally on April 22, 1970, to emphasize the necessity for the conservation of the world's natural resources. "
  • First Earth Day .. Continued

    First Earth Day .. Continued
    "Starting as a student-led campus movement, initially observed on March 21, Earth Day has become a major educational and media event. Earth day was a big deal for those who wanted it to happen. People were excited. Up to now we celebrate earth day every year on April 22. It was a great choice to make earth day possible.”
  • EPA was created

    EPA was created
    “EPA was established on December 2, 1970 to consolidate in one agency a variety of federal research, monitoring, standard-setting and enforcement activities to ensure environmental protection. Since its inception, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people. EPA stands for Environmental Protection Agency."
  • EPA was created .. Continued

    EPA was created .. Continued
    "EPA began to realize in the late 1990's that it didn't have sufficient air emissions data to determine potential regulatory requirements for AFOs under the Clean Air Act,(CAA), so to resolve the situation it began discussions with AFOs owners in 2001.”
  • The Beatles Break up

    The Beatles Break up
    “One of the biggest musical in history, The Beatles were John Lennon, George Harrison, and Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. Lennon and McCartney began playing together in the quarrymen on the 1957. They became more very famous later on. The breakup of the Beatles was one of the most popular and influential musical groups in history. The Beatles broke up due to many reasons like the death of their manager Brian Epstein in 1967. They were also involved in constant conflicts especially financially".
  • The Gold Standard ends

    The Gold Standard ends
    "The Gold Standard means that for every dollar printed you would have to have personal ownership of gold to back it up. But this would be an issue since there is only so much gold out there. So in 1971 then President Nixon got rid of this gold standard. He thought it was better to get rid of it. The gold standard has no purpose. "
  • The Pentagon Papers Released

    The Pentagon Papers Released
    "The Pentagon Papers demonstrated among to her things that the Johnson administration had systematically laid not only to the public but also to congress about a subject of transcend national interest and significance. This was released in June 2011. The papers revealed that the U.S had deliberately expanded its war with bombing of Cambodia Laos, coastal raids on North Vietnam, and Marine Corps attacks, none of which had been reported by media in the U.S. "
  • The Pentagon Papers Released Continued

    The Pentagon Papers Released Continued
    "The most damaging revelations in the papers revealed that four administrations, from Truman to Johnson, had misled the public regarding their intentions."
  • Cigarette ads are banned on TV

    Cigarette ads are banned on TV
    "The Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act is a United States federal law, passed in 1970, designed to limit the practice of smoking. It required a stronger health warning on cigarette packages, saying "Warning: The Surgeon General Has determined that Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health". The act also banned cigarette advertisements on American radio and television. "
  • Cigarette ads are banned on TV Continued

    Cigarette ads are banned on TV Continued
    "In 1981, the FFC reported that the health warning labels as mandated by the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act had little effect on American smoking habits. It was banned on January 2, 1971."
  • Supreme Court rules against death penalty

    Supreme Court rules against death penalty
    "The court rules the death penalty does not violate the Constitution, but the manner of its application in many states does. The court notes capital punishment was likely to be imposed in a discriminatory way and that blacks were far more likely to be executed than whites. The decision essentially ends the practice of executions. The age of 18 is the point where society draws the line for many purposes between childhood and adulthood."
  • George Wallace shot while campaigning

    George Wallace shot while campaigning
    "George Wallace was the Democratic governor of Alabama during the height of the Civil Rights Movement. Wallace was elected into office four times and served as governor for a combined 16 years. He also ran for President four times in 1964, 1968, 1972, and 1976. One day a young assailant dressed in red, white and blue shot Gov. George C. Wallace of Alabama. In the incident 3 other people were injured."
  • M*A*S*H

    M*A*S*H
    "M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, adapted from the 1970 feature film MASH which was itself based on the 1968 novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors, by Richard Hooker. Some of the characters in the T.V show were Charles S. Dubin, Alan Alda, Burt Metcalfe, Gere Reynolds, Don Weis, Jackie Cooper, and William K. Jurgensen."
  • OPEC Doubles Price of Oil

    OPEC Doubles Price of Oil
    “The, OPEC, was founded in Baghdad in 1960. The function of OPEC is to regulate oil production, and thereby manage oil prices, in a coordinated effort among the member countries. Membership is open to countries that are large exporters of oil. OPEC stands for Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. The member countries of OPEC are: Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela.”
  • Abortion Legalized in U.S

    Abortion Legalized in U.S
    “Abortion in the United States has been legal in every state since the 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade. Prior to "Roe", the legality of abortion was decided by the states; it was illegal in 30 states and legal under certain cases in 20 states. Roe established that "the right of personal privacy includes the abortion decision, but that this right is not unqualified, and must be considered against important state interests in regulation.”[1]Roe established a "trimester" system of increasin
  • Abortion Legalized in U.S Continued

    Abortion Legalized in U.S Continued
    “Roe established a "trimester" system of increasing state interest in the life of the fetus corresponding to the fetus's increasing "viability" (likelihood of survival outside the uterus) over the course of a pregnancy, such that states were prohibited from banning abortion early in pregnancy but allowed to impose increasing restrictions or outright bans later in pregnancy.
  • The War Powers Resolution of 1973

    The War Powers Resolution of 1973
    “The War Powers Resolution of 1973 is a federal law intended to check the power of the President in committing the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of Congress. The resolution was adopted in the form of a United States Congress joint resolution; this provides that the President can send U.S. armed forces into action abroad only by authorization of Congress or in case of "a national emergency created by attack upon the United States.
  • National speed limit 55

    National speed limit 55
    “The National Maximum Speed Law (NMSL) in the United States was a provision of the 1974Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act that prohibited speed limits higher than 55 miles per hour (89 km/h). It was drafted in response to oil price spikes and supply disruptions during the 1973 oil crisis.
    While officials hoped gasoline consumption would fall by 2.2%, actual savings are estimated at between 0.5% and 1%.
  • Patty Hearst Kidnapped

    Patty Hearst Kidnapped
    “On February 4, 1974, the 19-year-old Hearst was kidnapped from the Berkeley, California apartment she shared with her fiancé Steven Weed by a left-wing urban guerrilla group called the Symbionese Liberation Army. When the attempt to swap Hearst for jailed SLA members failed, the SLA demanded that the captive's family distribute $70 worth of food to every needy Californian – an operation that would cost an estimate of $400 million."
  • Patty Hearst Kidnapped

    Patty Hearst Kidnapped
    “In response, Hearst's father arranged the immediate donation of $6 million worth of food to the poor of the Bay Area. After the distribution of food, the SLA refused to release Hearst because they deemed the food to have been of poor quality. In a subsequent tape recording released to the press, Hearst commented that her father could have done better."
  • Freedom of Information Act passed over Ford’s veto

    Freedom of Information Act passed over Ford’s veto
    “The Freedom Information Act (FOIA) is a federal freedom of information law that allows for the full or partial disclosure of previously unreleased information and documents controlled by the United States government. The Act defines agency records subject to disclosure, outlines mandatory disclosure procedures and grants nine exemptions to the statute.[1] It was originally enacted by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 4, 1966 as 5 U.S.C. § 552 and went into effect the following year.”
  • The Fall of Saigon

    The Fall of Saigon
    “The Fall of Saigon (or Liberation of Saigon) was the capture of Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, by the People's Army of Vietnam and the National Liberation Front on April 30, 1975. The event marked the end of the Vietnam War and the start of a transition period leading to the formal reunification of Vietnam into a communist state.
  • The Fall of Saigon contiued

    The Fall of Saigon contiued
    "North Vietnamese forces under the command of the Senior General Văn Tiến Dũng began their final attack on Saigon, which was commanded by General Nguyen Van Toan on April 29, with a heavy artillery bombardment. This bombardment at the Tân Sơn Nhứt Airport killed the last two American servicemen that died in Vietnam, Charles McMahon and Darwin Judge.[1] By the afternoon of the next day,"
  • Jimmy Hoffa disappears

    Jimmy Hoffa disappears
    “James Riddle "Jimmy" Hoffa (born February 14, 1913 – disappeared July 30, 1975, declared legally dead July 30, 1982) was an American labor union leader.Hoffa was involved with the International Brotherhood of Teamsters union as an organizer from 1932 to 1975. He served as the union's General President from 1958 to 1971."
  • Jimmy Hoffa disappears

    Jimmy Hoffa disappears
    “He secured the first national agreement for teamsters' rates in 1964, and played a major role in the growth and development of the union, which eventually became the largest single union in the United States, with over 1.5 million members during his terms as its leader.Hoffa, who had been convicted of jury tampering, attempted bribery, and fraud in 1964, was imprisoned in 1967, sentenced to 13 years, after exhausting the appeal process."
  • Francisco Franco dies

    Francisco Franco dies
    “Francisco Franco was a Spanish general and head of the government of Spain. A career army officer, he was noted as a skillful leader and became army chief of staff in 1935. He joined the insurgents in the Spanish Civil War and was named El Caudillo (The Leader) of the nationalist forces. Francisco Franco died on 20th November 1975 and within two years almost every vestige of his dictatorship had disappeared.
  • Francisco Franco dies

    Francisco Franco dies
    "In the 1950s and '60s, his domestic policies moderated, and Spain made great economic progress. He provided for his succession by an official referendum in 1947 that made the Spanish state a monarchy, ratifying his powers as regent for life. In 1969 he designated Prince Juan Carlos as his successor.”
  • Legionnaire’s disease strikes 182, kills 29

    Legionnaire’s disease strikes 182, kills 29
    “Legionnaire disease, form of pneumonia caused by the bacillus Legionella pneumophila. The name of the disease (and of the bacterium) derives from a 1976 state convention of the American Legion, a U.S. military veterans’ organization, at a Philadelphia hotel where 182 Legionnaires contracted the disease, 29 of them fatally. The largest known outbreak of Legionnaire disease, confirmed in more than 300 people, occurred in Murcia, Spain, in 2001."
  • Legionnaire’s disease strikes 182, kills 29

    Legionnaire’s disease strikes 182, kills 29
    "Typically, but not uniformly, the first symptoms of Legionnaire disease are general malaise and headache, followed by high fever, often accompanied by chills. Coughing, shortness of breath, pleurisy-like pain, and abdominal distress are common, and occasionally some mental confusion is present. Although healthy individuals can contract Legionnaire disease, the most common patients are elderly or debilitated individuals or persons whose immunity is suppressed by drugs or disease."
  • Nadia Comaneci Given Seven Perfect Tens

     Nadia Comaneci Given Seven Perfect Tens
    “Nadia Elena Comăneci was born November 12, 1961 is a Romanian gymnast, winner of three Olympic gold medals at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal and the first female gymnast ever to be awarded a perfect score of 10 in an Olympic gymnastic event. She is also the winner of two gold medals at the 1980 Summer Olympics. She is one of the best-known gymnasts in the world. In 2000 Comăneci was named as one of the athletes of the century by the Laureus World Sports Academy.”
  • Entebbe Air Raid

    Entebbe Air Raid
    “Operation Entebbe was a counter-terrorist hostage-rescue mission carried out by the Special Forces of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) at Entebbe Airport in Uganda on 4 July 1976. A week earlier, on 27 June, an Air France plane with 248 passengers was hijacked, by members of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the German Revolutionary Cells, and flown to Entebbe, near Kampala, the capital of Uganda. Shortly after landing, all non-Israeli passengers, except one French citizen."
  • Alaskan Pipeline completed

    Alaskan Pipeline completed
    “The Alaskan pipeline, built to help slake America's insatiable thirst for oil, was designed to move oil from the fertile fields of the North Slope to Valdez, Alaska's northernmost ice-free port. The pipeline was an engineering marvel, considering the terrain that had to be negotiated: three mountain ranges and numerous rivers and streams stood between all those thirsty SUVs and their sustenance. The project, which was privately funded, cost $8 billion."
  • Alaskan Pipeline completed

    Alaskan Pipeline completed
    "Since turning on the spigot on June 20, 1977, more than 14 billion barrels of oil have flowed to the storage tanks at Valdez. The ARCO Juneau was the first tanker to carry crude through Prince William Sound. Around 20,000 ships have made the trip since, most notoriously the Exxon Valdez, which ran aground in 1989, spilling roughly 11 million gallons of oil and causing one of the worst ecological disasters in U.S. history.”
  • New York City Blackout

    New York City Blackout
    “The New York City blackout of 1977 was an electricity blackout that affected most of New York City from July 13, 1977 to July 14, 1977. The only neighborhoods in New York City that were not affected were in southern Queens, and neighborhoods of the Rockaway’s, which are part of the Long Island Lighting Company System. The blackout occurred when the city was facing a severe financial crisis and its residents were fretting over the Son of Sam murders.
  • New York City Blackout

    New York City Blackout
    “The New York City blackout of 1977 was an electricity blackout that affected most of New York City from July 13, 1977 to July 14, 1977. The only neighborhoods in New York City that were not affected were in southern Queens, and neighborhoods of the Rockaway’s, which are part of the Long Island Lighting Company System. The blackout occurred when the city was facing a severe financial crisis and its residents were fretting over the Son of Sam murders."
  • Elvis Found Dead

    Elvis Found Dead
    “Elvis Presley died on 16 August 1977 at his home Graceland in Memphis. His body was found by girlfriend, Ginger Alden in the upstairs bathroom. Ginger summoned Joe Esposito & Al Strada and Dr Nick. All efforts to revive Elvis were futile. Elvis had probably been dead for many hours by the time his body was found. Elvis had not gone to bed at his customary time, between six and seven am. "
  • Elvis Found Dead continued

    Elvis Found Dead continued
    “At about 2.30pm the Memphis Fire Department rescue units arrive at Graceland who rush seven mile to the Baptist Memorial Hospital. Elvis was pronounced "dead on arrival" after a 30 minute attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation. He was pronounced clinically dead at on the steps of the Baptist Hospital, Memphis. Elvis Aaron Presley was pronounced dead at 3.30pm on the 16 August 1977 by his physician, Dr. George Nichopoulos.”
  • Love Canal in New York declared federal disaster

    Love Canal in New York declared federal disaster
    "Love Canal was named after the late 18th century entrepreneur William T. Love who envisioned a canal connecting the two levels of the Niagara River which is separated by Niagara Falls. His plan attempted to incorporate a canal and would provide hydroelectric power to the Niagara area. At the time of the dump's closure, Niagara Falls was entering an economic boom and the population had surpassed 85,000, with the population expanding at record percentages."
  • Love Canal in New York declared federal disaster continued

    Love Canal in New York declared federal disaster continued
    The Niagara Falls City School District needed land to build new schools, and attempted to purchase the property from Hooker Chemical that had been used to bury toxic waste. The corporation refused to sell, citing safety concerns, and took members of the school board to the canal and drilled several bore holes to demonstrate that there were toxic chemicals below the surface. However, the board refused to capitulate.Eventually, faced with the property being condemned and/or expropriated.
  • First Test-Tube Baby Born

    First Test-Tube Baby Born
    First Test-Tube Baby Born (1978): Since 1966, Dr. Patrick Steptoe, a gynecologist at Oldham General Hospital, and Dr. Robert Edwards, a physiologist at Cambridge University, had been actively working on finding an alternative solution for conception for women with blocked Fallopian tubes. However, even after they found a way to fertilize an egg outside a human body, they continued to have problems replacing the fertilized egg back into a uterus.
  • First Test-Tube Baby Born continued

    First Test-Tube Baby Born continued
    "On November 10, 1977, Lesley Brown underwent the very experimental in vitro ("in glass") fertilization procedure. This time, the doctors implanted the fertilized egg back into Brown in a shorter time period than they had previously tried."
  • John Paul II Becomes Pope

    John Paul II Becomes Pope
    “Pope John Paul II, born Karol Józef Wojtyła 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005, reigned as Pope of the Catholic Church from 1978 until his death in 2005. He was the second-longest serving Pope in history and the first non-Italian since 1523."John Paul II was acclaimed as one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century. He was instrumental in ending communism in his native Poland and eventually all of Europe." Conversely, he denounced the excesses of capitalism."
  • John Paul II Becomes Pope continued

    John Paul II Becomes Pope continued
    “John Paul II significantly improved the Catholic Church's relations with Judaism, Islam, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Anglican Communion. Though criticized by progressives for upholding the Church's teachings against artificial contraception and the ordination of women, and by traditionalists for his support of the Church's Second Vatican Council and its reform, he was also widely praised for his firm, orthodox Catholic stances.”
  • Margaret Thatcher First Woman Prime Minister of Great Britain

    Margaret Thatcher First Woman Prime Minister of Great Britain
    “Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS, née Roberts is a British politician and the longest-serving (1979–1990) British prime minister of the 20th century, and the only woman ever to have held the post. A Soviet journalist nicknamed her the "Iron Lady", which later became associated with her uncompromising policies. As prime minister, she implemented conservative policies that have come to be known as Thatcherism."
  • Margaret Thatcher First Woman Prime Minister of Great Britain continued

    Margaret Thatcher First Woman Prime Minister of Great Britain continued
    " Originally a chemist before becoming a barrister, Thatcher was elected Member of Parliamen (MP) for Finchley in 1959. Edward Heath appointed her Secretary of State for Education and Science in his 1970 government. In 1975 Thatcher defeated Heath in the Conservative Party leadership election and became Leader of the Opposition, as well as the first woman to lead a major political party in the United Kingdom. She became prime minister after winning the 1979 general election.”
  • Jerry Falwell begins Moral Majority

    Jerry Falwell begins Moral Majority
    “In 1979, Falwell founded the Moral Majority, which became one of the largest political lobby groups for evangelical Christians in the United States during the 1980s. The Moral Majority was founded as being "pro-family", "pro-life", "pro-defense" and pro-Israel. The group is credited with delivering two thirds of the white, evangelical Christian vote to Ronald Reagan during the 1980 presidential election."
  • Jerry Falwell begins Moral Majority

    Jerry Falwell begins Moral Majority
    “During his time as head of the Moral Majority, Falwell consistently pushed for Republican candidates and for conservative politics. This led Billy Graham to criticize him for "sermonizing" about political issues that lacked a moral element.”
  • Iran Takes American Hostages in Tehran

    Iran Takes American Hostages in Tehran
    “The Iran hostage crisis was a diplomatic crisis between Iran and the United States where 52 Americans were held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979 to January 20, 1981, after a group of Islamist students and militants took over the American Embassy in Tehran in support of the Iranian Revolution. President Carter called the hostages "victims of terrorism and anarchy," adding that the "United States will not yield to blackmail.”
  • Iran Takes American Hostages in Tehran

    Iran Takes American Hostages in Tehran
    “The episode reached a climax when, after failed attempts to negotiate a release, the United States military attempted a rescue operation, Operation Eagle Claw, on April 24, 1980, which resulted in a failed mission, the deaths of eight American servicemen, one Iranian civilian, and the destruction of two aircraft. It ended with the signing of the Algiers Accords in Algeria on January 19, 1981."
  • Sit Sources:)

    Pentagon papers released: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentagon_Papers
    http://www.ask.com/wiki/Pentagon_Papers
    Cigarette ads are banned on TV:
    http://www.ask.com/wiki/Public_Health_Cigarette_Smoking_Act?oo=0
    1972:
    Supreme Court rules against death penalty:
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4518051
    George Wallace shot while campaigning: