History Technology Project 1800-1876

Timeline created by AnnalieseStumpTimeToast
In History
  • Gabriel's Rebellion

    Gabriel's Rebellion
    Gabriel Prosser, a literate slave, started and led a revolt in the area of Richmond, Virginia. The plot was to end slavery in Virginia, but it was thwarted when Gabriel was caught. A total of 27 black men, including Gabriel, were publicly hung.
  • The Third US President

    The Third US President
    On March 4, 1801, the third U.S. President was brought into office--Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, architect, philosopher, and Founding Father.
  • Marbury v. Madison

    Marbury v. Madison
    Marbury v. Madison was a U.S. Supreme Court case in 1803 that established the principle of judicial review in the United States. This allowed American courts to have the power to strike down laws, statutes, and a few government actions that violate the Constitution of the United States. This greatly expanded the power of the Court by allowing it to declare acts of Congress as unconstitutional.
  • Louisiana Purchase

    Louisiana Purchase
    In the Louisiana Purchase, The United States agreed to pay France $15 million for the Louisiana Territory, which extends west from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains. This land is suspected to be sold because of the need of money and the lacking of ability to defend the land. However, as a result, the U.S. nearly doubled in size.
  • The Fourth U.S. President

    The Fourth U.S. President
    The inauguration of James Madison as the fourth President of the United States was held on March 4, 1809. He was an an American statesman, lawyer, diplomat, philosopher and Founding Father.
  • The Fifth U.S. President

    The Fifth U.S. President
    The inauguration of James Monroe as the fifth President of the United States was held on March 4, 1817. It was in front of the Old Brick Capitol, where the Supreme Court building now stands. Monroe was an an American statesman, lawyer, diplomat and Founding Father--as most early Presidents seem to be.
  • The Adams-Onis Treaty

    The Adams-Onis Treaty
    The Adams–Onís Treaty of 1819 was a treaty between the United States and Spain that ceded Florida to the U.S. and defined the boundary between the U.S. and New Spain. This treaty settled disputed about the border between the United States and the Spanish Empire.
  • The Missouri Compromise of 1820

    The Missouri Compromise of 1820
    In an effort to maintain the balance between free and slave states, Maine was admitted as a free state so that Missouri can be admitted as a slave state. The Missouri Compromise was the legislation that maintained the balance of power between the North and South in the United States Senate.
  • The Monroe Doctrine

    The Monroe Doctrine
    The Monroe Doctrine warns European nations through four basic points; (1) the United States would not get involved in the internal affairs of or the wars between European powers; (2) the United States would not interfere with existing colonies in the Western Hemisphere; (3) the Western Hemisphere was closed to future colonization; and (4) any attempt by a European power to oppress any nation in the Western Hemisphere would be viewed as a hostile act against the United States.
  • The Sixth U.S. President

    The Sixth U.S. President
    The inauguration of John Quincy Adams as the sixth President of the United States took place on March 4, 1825. Adams was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist.
  • Opening of the Erie Canal

    Opening of the Erie Canal
    The Erie Canal was officially opened on October 25, 1825. It linked Lake Erie and all the Great Lakes to the Hudson River and New York. Construction on the canal began in 1816. Once it was finished, it improved the economy in New York, it lead New York to industrialization, and it decreased the cost of transporting goods.
  • The Seventh U.S. President

    The Seventh U.S. President
    The inauguration of Andrew Jackson as the seventh President of the United States was held on March 4, 1829. Jackson was an American soldier and statesman.
  • The Indian Removal Act

    The Indian Removal Act
    The Indian Removal Act was made into law on May 28, 1830. The law authorized the president to negotiate with southern Native American tribes for their relocation to territory west of the Mississippi River in exchange for white settlement in their ancestral lands. For the Cherokee, the journey from their homeland was called the "Trail of Tears."
  • Nat Turner's Rebellion

    Nat Turner's Rebellion
    Nat Turner's Rebellion was a slave rebellion that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, in August 1831. Rebellious slaves killed 55 to 65 people, at least 51 being white. The rebellion was put down within a few days, but Turner survived in hiding for more than two months. The laws enacted after this revolt made it to where most slaves were illiterate. This illiteracy paved the road to the start of the American Civil War.
  • Texas Declaration of Independence

    Texas Declaration of Independence
    The Texas Declaration of Independence was the formal declaration of independence of the Republic of Texas from Mexico. It was adopted at the Convention of 1836 at Washington-on-the-Brazos on March 2, 1836. This declaration marked the end of the Texas Revolution against Mexico.
  • The Eighth U.S. President

    The Eighth U.S. President
    The inauguration of Martin Van Buren as the eighth President of the United States took place on March 4, 1837. Van Buren was an American statesman and was the first president born after the independence of America from the British Empire.
  • The Telegraph

    The Telegraph
    Sir William Fothergill Cooke and Charles Wheatstone successfully demonstrated the first electrical telegraph that was installed between Euston and Camden Town in London. This telegraph found its way to America on May 24, 1844.
  • The Ninth and Tenth U.S. Presidents

    The Ninth and Tenth U.S. Presidents
    The inauguration the ninth President of the United States was held on March 4, 1841. William Henry Harrison was an American military officer and politician. He died one month later from typhoid and was seceded by his Vice President--John Tyler.
  • The Eleventh U.S. President

    The Eleventh U.S. President
    The inauguration of James K. Polk as the 11th President of the United States took place on March 4, 1845. The inauguration marked the commencement of the only four-year term of James K. Polk as President with his Vice President George M. Dallas. Polk was the Speaker of the House of Representatives and governor of Tennessee.
  • The Twelfth U.S. President

    The Twelfth U.S. President
    The inauguration of Zachary Taylor as the 12th President of the United States was held on March 5, 1849. The reason it was a day late was because the fourth was a Sunday, the Christian sabbath day. Taylor was originally a career officer in the United States Army, but he then rose to the rank of major general and became a national hero because of his victories in the Mexican–American War.
  • The Missouri Compromise of 1850

    The Missouri Compromise of 1850
    California was admitted to the Union as the 16th free state in exchange of the South being guaranteed that no federal restrictions on slavery would be placed on Utah or New Mexico. The Compromise of 1850 overturned the Missouri Compromise and left the overall issue of slavery open for conflict.
  • The Thirteenth U.S. President

    The Thirteenth U.S. President
    The inauguration of Millard Fillmore was held on July 10, 1850. It was done at this time because of the death of President Zachary Taylor the previous day. Fillmore was the last member of the Whig party while in the White House
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    Lewis and Clark's Expedition

    The Lewis and Clark Expedition from May 1804 to September 1806 was the first American expedition to cross the western portion of the United States. Their goal was to investigate the unknown territory of the New World, establish trade with the Natives, and strengthen the sovereignty of the United States in the region. Additionally, one of their main goals was to find a river or waterway from the US to the Pacific Ocean.
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    The War of 1812

    The War of 1812 was a conflict fought between the United States and the United Kingdom from June of 1812 to February of 1815. It was caused by impressment sparking public outrage. The War began when James Madison signed off in the war. This would mark the first time that the United States had declared war on another nation.
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    The Mexican-American War

    The Mexican–American War was an armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848. The war started because Mexican cavalry attacked a group of U.S. soldiers, killing about a dozen. The Treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo ended the conflict about two years later. This treaty made it to where Mexico ceded 55 percent of its territory, including parts of present-day Arizona, California, New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, Nevada, and Utah, to the United States.
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    The Seneca Falls Convention

    The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women's rights convention. It was held in the Wesleyan Chapel of the town of Seneca Falls, New York. This convention was the first large action taken for the rights that woman have in the "civil society."
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    The Secession of States in America

    Eleven states seceded because of the disagreement on the right to own slaves. South Carolina seceded on December 20, 1860, Mississippi seceded on January 9, 1861, Florida seceded on January 10, 1861, Alabama seceded on January 11, 1861, Georgia seceded on January 19, 1861, Louisiana seceded on January 26, 1861, Texas seceded on February 1, 1861, Virginia seceded on April 17, 1861, Arkansas seceded on May 6, 1861, North Carolina seceded on May 20, 1861, and Tennessee seceded on June 8, 1861.
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    The American Civil War

    The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865 between the North and the South--the Union vs. the Confederates. The Civil War began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. Some of these battles include the Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Shiloh, and the Battle of Fort Sumter (1861). It ended when Robert E. Lee surrendered the Confederate army to Ulysses S. Grant at the Appomattox Courthouse on April 9.