darriasw

By darrias
  • 195

    Paul Rand, poster for the film No Way Out,

     Paul Rand, poster for the film No Way Out,
    Rand's integration of photography, typography, signs, graphic shapes, and the surrounding white space stands in marked contrast to typical film posters.
  • Jun 4, 1000

    Cave painting from Lascaux

    Cave painting from Lascaux
    Random placement and shifting scale signify prehistoric people's lack of structure and sequence in recording their experiences.
  • Jul 17, 1100

    Black stone duck weight, c. 3000 BCE

    Black stone duck weight, c. 3000 BCE
    The cuneiform inscription dedicates this weight to the god Nanna by the King of Ur and confirms a weight of five minas. A mina weighed about 0.6 kilograms, or 18 ounces.
  • May 5, 1200

    Stamp-cylinder seal (“the Tyszkiewicz seal”), Hittite, 1650–1200 BCE.

    Stamp-cylinder seal (“the Tyszkiewicz seal”), Hittite, 1650–1200 BCE.
    Combining decorative ornamentation with figurative images, this most likely portrays a ritual, possibly with a sacrificial offering on the right. It has both an image on the side, for rolling, and an image on the bottom, for stamping. Because it allows images to be reproduced, the cylinder seal can be seen as a precursor to printing.
  • Sep 8, 1500

    Ras Shamra script, c. 1500 BCE

    Ras Shamra script, c. 1500 BCE
    Used for bureaucratic and commercial documents and for myths and legends, the Ras Shamra script, which reduces cuneiform to a mere thirty-two characters, was only recently unearthed in the ruins of the ancient city of Ugarit.
  • An Epoch of Typographic Genius

    After a drought of graphic-design creativity during the 1600s, the eighteenth century was an epoch of typographic originality. In 1692 the French king Louis XIV, who had a strong interest in printing, ordered a committee of scholars to develop a new typeface for the Imprimerie Royale, the royal printing office established in 1640 to restore quality. The new letters were to be designed by “scientific” principles. Headed by mathematician Nicolas Jaugeon, the academicians examined all previous alph
  • Louis Simonneau, master alphabets for the Romain du Roi

    Louis Simonneau, master alphabets for the Romain du Roi
    These copperplate engravings were intended to establish graphic standards for the new alphabet.
  • Period: to

    Graphic Design and the Industrial Revolution

    perfected the steam engine, which was deployed rapidly starting in the 1780s, animal and human power were the primary sources of energy. Over the course of the nineteenth century, the amount of energy generated by steam power increased a hundredfold. During the last three decades of the century, electricity and gasoline-fueled engines further expanded productivity. A factory system with machine manufacturing and divisions of labor was developed. New materials, particularly iron and steel, became
  • title page from The Book of Thel

    title page from The Book of Thel
    Publication of his General History of Quadrupeds in 1790 brought renown to Bewick and his technique, which became a major illustration method in
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    letterpress printing until the advent of photomechanical halftones nearly a century later.
  • Stele bearing the Code of Hammurabi, which was developed between 1792 and 1750 BCE.

    Stele bearing the Code of Hammurabi, which was developed between 1792 and 1750 BCE.
    Above the densely textured law code, King Hammurabi is shown on a mountaintop with the seated sun god Shamash, who orders the king to write down the laws for the people of Babylon. A graphic image of divine authority as the source for the code becomes powerful visual persuasion.
  • Pierre Didot, title page for Lettres d'une Péruvienne

    Pierre Didot, title page for Lettres d'une Péruvienne
    As a child, Blake reported seeing angels in a tree and the prophet Ezekiel in a field. After completing an engraving apprenticeship and
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    studying at the Royal Academy, Blake opened a printing shop at age twenty-seven, where he was assisted by his younger brother Robert. Upon Robert's death three years later, Blake reported that he saw Robert's soul joyfully rising through the ceiling. Blake informed friends that Robert appeared to him in a dream and told him about a way to print his poem
  • Egyptian hieroglyphs

    Egyptian hieroglyphs
    Napoleon conducted an expedition to Egypt in an effort to sever the English land route to India. In August 1799, his troops were digging a foundation for an addition to the fortification in the Egyptian town of Rosetta, which they were occupying. A black slab was unearthed bearing an inscription in two languages and three scripts: Egyptian hieroglyphics, Egyptian demotic script, and Greek.
  • Period: to

    decorative three-dimensional fonts, 1835.

    Johann Heinrich Meyer foundry in Braunschweig, Germany, decorative three-dimensional fonts
  • Aloys Senefelder, pages from A Complete Course of Lithography

    Aloys Senefelder, pages from A Complete Course of Lithography
    This is an English translation of Vollständiges Lehrbuch der Steindruckerey (Complete Textbook of Lithography) published in 1818.
  • William Playfair, Chart no. 1 from A Letter on Our Agricultural Distresses

    William Playfair, Chart no. 1 from A Letter on Our Agricultural Distresses
    This hand-colored engraving uses a fever and bar chart to depict “in one view the price of the quarter of wheat.”
  • William Playfair, Chart no. 3 from A Letter on Our Agricultural Distresses

    William Playfair, Chart no. 3 from A Letter on Our Agricultural Distresses
    This hand-colored engraving also uses a bar chart to depict the cost of wheat.
  • Joseph Niépce, the first photograph from nature

     Joseph Niépce, the first photograph from nature
    Looking out over the rear courtyard of the Niépce home, the light and shadow patterns formed by (from left to right) a wing of the house, a pear tree, a barn roof in front of a low bake house with a chimney, and another wing of the house are seen.
  • William Henry Fox Talbot, the first photographic negative

    William Henry Fox Talbot, the first photographic negative
    This image was made on Talbot's light-sensitive paper in a camera obscura, which pointed toward the leaded glass windows in a large room of his mansion, Lacock Abbey.
  • Stephenson Blake foundry, Clarendon specimen

    Stephenson Blake foundry, Clarendon specimen
    The Stephenson Blake foundry produced a larger and more condensed version of Clarendon.
  • William Henry Fox Talbot, print from the first photographic negative

    William Henry Fox Talbot, print from the first photographic negative
    The sun provided the light source to contact-print the negative to another sheet of sensitized paper, producing this positive image of the sky and land outside the windows.
  • Louis Jacques Daguerre, Paris boulevard

     Louis Jacques Daguerre, Paris boulevard
    In this early daguerreotype, the wagons, carriages, and pedestrians were not recorded because the slow exposure could only record stationary objects. On the lower left street corner, a man stopped to have his boots polished. He and the polisher were the first people ever to be photographed.
  • William Henry Fox Talbot, camera-less shadow picture of flowers

    William Henry Fox Talbot, camera-less shadow picture of flowers
    By sandwiching the flowers between his photographic paper and a sheet of glass and exposing the light-sensitive emulsion to sunlight, Talbot invented the photogram, later extensively used as a design tool by designers such as László Moholy-Nagy.
  • Sir Charles Barry with A. W. N. Pugin, the House of Lords in the British Houses of Parliament, constructed

     Sir Charles Barry with A. W. N. Pugin, the House of Lords in the British Houses of Parliament, constructed
    The Gothic Revival evolved from ornamental details inspired by Gothic architecture.
  • Henry Caslon, Ionic type specimen

    Henry Caslon, Ionic type specimen
    Bracketing refers to the curved transition from the main strokes of a letterform to its serif. Egyptian type replaced the bracket with an abrupt angle; Ionic type restored a slight bracket.
  • Pages from Talbot's The Pencil of Nature

    Pages from Talbot's The Pencil of Nature
    The first book to be illustrated entirely with photographs, The Pencil of Nature had original prints mounted onto the printed page. Plate VII is a photogram. (The use of modern-style type with ornate initials is typical of early Victorian book design.)
  • Title page for The Pencil of Nature,

    Title page for The Pencil of Nature,
    This design demonstrates the eclectic confusion of the Victorian era. Medieval letterforms, baroque plant designs, and Celtic interlaces are combined into a dense symmetrical design.
  • David O. Hill and Robert Adamson, Reverend Thomas H. Jones, c

    David O. Hill and Robert Adamson, Reverend Thomas H. Jones, c
    The painter's attention to lighting, characterization, placement of hands and head, and composition within the rectangle replaced the mug-shot sensibility of earlier photographers.
  • specimen of an early Clarendon

    specimen of an early Clarendon
    An adaptation of Ionic that was even subtler than the development of Ionic from Egyptian, Clarendon styles were wildly popular after their introduction. When the three-year patent on Clarendon expired, other founders issued numerous imitations and piracies.
  • Joseph Morse, multicolored woodcut poster

    Joseph Morse, multicolored woodcut poster
    The heroic scale—262 by 344 centimeters (8.5 by 11 feet)—permitted life-sized figures to tower before the headline “Five Celebrated Clowns Attached to Sands, Nathan Co.'s Circus.”
  • Owen Jones, color plate from The Grammar of Ornament,

    Owen Jones, color plate from The Grammar of Ornament,
    This plate shows patterns found in the arts and crafts of India.
  • F. T. Nadar, “Sarah Bernhardt

     F. T. Nadar, “Sarah Bernhardt
    The famous actress took Paris by storm and became a major subject for the emerging French poster.
  • Mathew Brady, “Dunker Church and the Dead,”

    Mathew Brady, “Dunker Church and the Dead,”
    Made in the aftermath of the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest battle of the Civil War, this photograph shows how visual documentation took on a new level of supposed authenticity with photography. Due to technical limitations of the medium, photographers such as Brady could only photograph the results of battles, not the actual fighting. This has led to speculation by scholars that scenes captured by photographs were “staged” or otherwise altered. For example, scholars have suggested that the b
  • After A. H. Wald, cover for Harper's Weekly

    After A. H. Wald, cover for Harper's Weekly
    Engraved after a sketch by a “visual journalist” in the field, this cover is a forerunner of newsmagazine coverage of current events. Though constructed by several different artists and dramatized to create an engaging illustration, images such as these gave Harper's readers visual evidence of significant historical events.
  • Attributed to Mathew Brady, photograph

    Attributed to Mathew Brady, photograph
    “Freedmen on the Canal Bank at Richmond,” 1865. The photographer supplied the visual evidence needed by the illustrator to document an event.
  • Julia Margaret Cameron, “Alfred Lord Tennyson

     Julia Margaret Cameron, “Alfred Lord Tennyson
    Moving beyond descriptive imagery, Cameron's compelling psychological portraits revealed her subjects' inner being.
  • Timothy H. O'Sullivan, “Sand Dunes near Sand Springs, Nevada

    Timothy H. O'Sullivan, “Sand Dunes near Sand Springs, Nevada
    Expedition photographers, many of whom were financed by the government, documented the American West. O'Sullivan's photography wagon—isolated by the sand dunes—becomes a symbol of lonely journeys over vast distances.
  • John H. Bufford's Sons, “Swedish Song Quartett” poster

    John H. Bufford's Sons, “Swedish Song Quartett” poster
    Arched words move gracefully above seven carefully composed musicians. Large capital letters point to the three soloists, establishing a visual relationship between word and image.
  • Forst, Averell & Co., poster for the Hoe printing press

    Forst, Averell & Co., poster for the Hoe printing press
    This press made mass editions of chromolithographs possible.
  • Morris Père et Fils (letterpress printers) and Emile Levy (lithographer), “Cirque d'hiver” poster

    Morris Père et Fils (letterpress printers) and Emile Levy (lithographer), “Cirque d'hiver” poster
    Performers are presented almost as surrealistic butterfly women.
  • Morris Père et Fils (letterpress printers) and Emile Levy (lithographer), “Cirque d'hiver” poster

    Morris Père et Fils (letterpress printers) and Emile Levy (lithographer), “Cirque d'hiver” poster
    Performers are presented almost as surrealistic butterfly women.
  • Thomas Nast, political cartoon from Harper's Weekly

    Thomas Nast, political cartoon from Harper's Weekly
    This double-page image was posted throughout New York City on election day.
  • Thomas Nast, political cartoon from Harper's Weekly,

    Thomas Nast, political cartoon from Harper's Weekly,
    In this cartoon depicting citizens both creating and hanging posters against Tammany Hall, the caption begins by saying, “Here's the smell of corruption still!”
  • Walter Crane, page from Absurd ABC

    Walter Crane, page from Absurd ABC
    Animated figures are placed against a black background; large letterforms are integrated with the imagery. Crane designed several alphabet books, each one unlike the others.
  • John Macdonald, wood engraving, Freedmen on the Canal Bank at Richmond

    John Macdonald, wood engraving, Freedmen on the Canal Bank at Richmond
    The tonality of the photographer's image was reinvented with the visual syntax of wood-engraved line.
  • Illustration of Moss's photographic department, from Scientific American

    Illustration of Moss's photographic department, from Scientific American
    When this major science journal reported on the rise of photoengraving, it revealed that, unknown to its readers, thousands of photoengravings had been used side by side with hand engravings during the 1870s with no recognizable differences.
  • Randolph Caldecott, illustration from Hey Diddle Diddle, c

     Randolph Caldecott, illustration from Hey Diddle Diddle, c
    Oblivious to the outlandish elopement, Caldecott's dancing dinnerware moves to a driving musical rhythm.
  • Cover of The New Block ABC with Nursery Rhymes, c.

    The playful imagery served to make the blocks entertaining while also serving their didactic purpose.
  • and 9–38. Stephen H. Horgan, experimental photoengraving

     and 9–38. Stephen H. Horgan, experimental photoengraving
    This, the first halftone printing plate to reproduce a photograph in a newspaper, heralded the potential of photography in visual communications.
  • Eadweard Muybridge, plate published in The Horse in Motion,

    Eadweard Muybridge, plate published in The Horse in Motion,
    Sequence photography proved the ability of graphic images to record time-and-space relationships. Moving images became a possibility.
  • Krebs Lithographing Company, poster for the Cincinnati Industrial Exposition

    Krebs Lithographing Company, poster for the Cincinnati Industrial Exposition
    A buoyant optimism in industrial progress is conveyed.
  • Louis Prang, Valentine card,

     Louis Prang, Valentine card,
    Chromolithography. This sentimental card is a good example of the range of tone and color that could be achieved with chromolithography.
  • Richard G. Tietze, poster for Harper's Magazine

    Richard G. Tietze, poster for Harper's Magazine
    An impressionistic quality is achieved in an illustration divided into three zones, with the middle holly area providing a background for the message while separating the images.
  • W. J. Morgan and Co., Cleveland, lithographic theater poster

    W. J. Morgan and Co., Cleveland, lithographic theater poster
    Montage illustrations become overlapping planes with varied scale and spatial depth.
  • S. S. Frizzall (artist) and J. H. Bufford's Sons (printers), poster for the Cleveland and Hendricks presidential campaign

     S. S. Frizzall (artist) and J. H. Bufford's Sons (printers), poster for the Cleveland and Hendricks presidential campaign
    The loose style of the flags and other symbolic imagery framing the candidates emphasizes the extreme realism of the portraits.
  • Kate Greenaway, page from A Apple Pie

    Kate Greenaway, page from A Apple Pie
    By leaving out the background, Greenaway simplified her page designs and focused on the figures.
  • Paul Nadar, “Nadar Interviewing Chevreul,”

     Paul Nadar, “Nadar Interviewing Chevreul,”
    The words spoken by the one-hundred-year-old chemist were recorded below each photograph to produce a visual-verbal record of the interview.
  • Schumacher & Ettlinger, lithographers, cover and pages from Our Navy premium booklet

    Schumacher & Ettlinger, lithographers, cover and pages from Our Navy premium booklet
    Complex illusions are created by contrasting scale and perspective.
  • Advertisement for the Kodak camera

     Advertisement for the Kodak camera
    George Eastman's camera, simple enough for anyone “who can wind a watch,” played a major role in making photography every person's art form.
  • Jan Toorop, poster for Delftsche Slaolie (Delft Salad Oil)

     Jan Toorop, poster for Delftsche Slaolie (Delft Salad Oil)
    Printed in yellow and lavender, this poster becomes kinetic through its undulating linear rhythms and close-valued complementary colors.
  • Giovanni Mataloni, Brevetto Auer poster

    Giovanni Mataloni, Brevetto Auer poster
  • Margaret and Frances Macdonald with J. Herbert McNair, poster for the Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts

    Margaret and Frances Macdonald with J. Herbert McNair, poster for the Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts
    The symbolic figures have been assigned both religious and romantic interpretations.
  • This paper model of the Hoe “quadruple web-perfecting press,” printed using chromolithography, was published on 13 Septembe

    This paper model of the Hoe “quadruple web-perfecting press,” printed using chromolithography, was published on 13 Septembe
    in a supplement to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle.
  • Margaret Macdonald, bookplate design,

    Margaret Macdonald, bookplate design,
    Reproduced in Ver Sacrum (Sacred Spring) in 1901 as part of an article on the Glasgow group, this design depicts Wisdom protecting her children within the leaflike shelter of her hair before a symbolic tree of knowledge, whose linear structure is based on Macdonald's metalwork.
  • Frank Lloyd Wright, first chapter opening spread for The House Beautiful,

    Frank Lloyd Wright, first chapter opening spread for The House Beautiful,
    An underlying geometric structure imposed a strong order upon the intricacy of Wright's textural design
  • Charles Rennie Mackintosh, poster for the Scottish Musical Review

     Charles Rennie Mackintosh, poster for the Scottish Musical Review
    In this towering image that rises 2.5 meters (over 8 feet) above the spectator, complex overlapping planes are unified by areas of flat color. The white ring and birds around the figure create a strong focal point.
  • Otto Eckmann, Jugend cover

    Otto Eckmann, Jugend cover
    Jugendstil graphics often blended curvilinear stylization with traditional realism.
  • J. H. and J. M. de Groot, Driehoeken bij ontwerpen van ornament (Triangles in the Design of Ornament), published by Joh. G. Stemler & Cz., Amsterdam,

    J. H. and J. M. de Groot, Driehoeken bij ontwerpen van ornament (Triangles in the Design of Ornament), published by Joh. G. Stemler & Cz., Amsterdam,
    This is one of many Dutch books that provided instruction on the construction of art nouveau ornaments.
  • Jan Toorop, binding for Psyche, by Louis Couperus, published by L. J. Veen, Amsterdam

    Jan Toorop, binding for Psyche, by Louis Couperus, published by L. J. Veen, Amsterdam
    Psyche is a symbolic, tragic, and erotic fairy tale of Princess Psyche, Prince Eros, and the winged stallion Chimera. Psyche was a princess from the Land of Today and longed for the Land of Tomorrow. She was born with two useless little wings with which she wished to soar to other realms. One day while at her father's palace, she saw in the ephemeral cloud shapes a knight on the blond winged steed called Chimera. As depicted on the binding, Chimera eventually became reality and in Psyche's death
  • Peter Behrens, The Kiss

    Peter Behrens, The Kiss
    This six-color woodcut, controversial for its androgynous imagery, was first reproduced in Pan magazine.
  • Hans Christiansen, Jugend cover

    Hans Christiansen, Jugend cover
    The stylized curves of the letterforms echo the curves of the illustration's flat shapes.
  • Hans Christiansen, page design for Jugend

    Hans Christiansen, page design for Jugend
    Decorative motifs created lyrical environments for poetry.
  • Currier Lithograph Co., lithographic poster

    Currier Lithograph Co., lithographic poster
    This promotion of Buffalo Bill's traveling Wild West show, a popular spectacle featuring horseback-riding cowboys and Indians, helped strengthen the myth of the American West at the same time that the nation was becoming increasingly urban. A portrait of Buffalo Bill on horseback appears at the right.
  • Peter Behrens, trademark for Insel-Verlag,

    Peter Behrens, trademark for Insel-Verlag,
    The ship in a circle perched on art nouveau waves typifies Jugendstil trademark design.
  • L. Prang and Company and others, c

     L. Prang and Company and others, c
    This collection shows a range of graphic ephemera printed by chromolithography.
  • Chris Lebeau, binding for De stille kracht (The Quiet Power) by Louis Couperus, published by Van Holkema en Warendorf, Amsterdam,

     Chris Lebeau, binding for De stille kracht (The Quiet Power) by Louis Couperus, published by Van Holkema en Warendorf, Amsterdam,
    The binding uses the batik process that was indigenous to the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia).
  • Franz Laskoff, Monte Tabor poster

    Franz Laskoff, Monte Tabor poster
  • Talwin Morris, binding for The Book of the Home, No. 3

    Talwin Morris, binding for The Book of the Home, No. 3
    Morris applied his generic style to widely diverse publications.
  • Otto Eckmann, cover for an Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft catalogue

     Otto Eckmann, cover for an Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft catalogue
    Brush-drawn lettering and ornaments express the kinetic energy of electricity
  • Adolfo Hohenstein, Bitter Campari poster

    Adolfo Hohenstein, Bitter Campari poster
  • Marcello Dudovich, Bitter Campari poster,

    Marcello Dudovich, Bitter Campari poster,
    The message is unambiguous as Dudovich equates sensual pleasure with that derived from Bitter Campari.
  • Otto Eckmann, type specimen for Eckmann Dekorative Schrift

    Otto Eckmann, type specimen for Eckmann Dekorative Schrift
    The blending of contradictory influences—medieval, Asian, and art nouveau—produced an extremely popular type family, Eckmannschrift, which included Decorative Scripts.
  • S. H. de Roos, design for De vrouwen kwestie, haar historische ontwikkeling en haar economische kant

     S. H. de Roos, design for De vrouwen kwestie, haar historische ontwikkeling en haar economische kant
    (The Woman Question, Her Historical Development and Her Economical Side), by Lily Braun, published by A. B. Soep, Amsterdam,
  • Leonetto Capiello, E. & A. Mele & C. poster

    Leonetto Capiello, E. & A. Mele & C. poster
  • Peter Behrens, page design for Jugend

     Peter Behrens, page design for Jugend
    Evoking peacock feathers and Egyptian lotus designs, an abstract column rises between two columns of textura-inspired type.
  • Jessie Marion King, double title pages for William Morris's The Defence of Guenevere

    Jessie Marion King, double title pages for William Morris's The Defence of Guenevere
    Vigorous energy and fragile delicacy, seemingly contradictory qualities, characterize King's work.
  • Stereocard depicting President Theodore Roosevelt delivering his inaugural address,

    Stereocard depicting President Theodore Roosevelt delivering his inaugural address,
  • Harrild and Sons, London, wood-type fonts

    Harrild and Sons, London, wood-type fonts
    In spite of the decrease in letterpress posters, wood type continued to be manufactured, though on a much smaller scale, during the first years of the twentieth century.
  • This classic Metlicovitz poster exudes an optimistic elegance.

     This classic Metlicovitz poster exudes an optimistic elegance.
    Internationale Milan inaugurating the Simplon Tunnel
  • Talwin Morris, bindings for the Red Letter Shakespeare series, c.

    Talwin Morris, bindings for the Red Letter Shakespeare series, c.
    A standardized format and subtle graphic lyricism were achieved in economical commercial editions.
  • Talwin Morris, page ornaments from the Red Letter Shakespeare series, c.

     Talwin Morris, page ornaments from the Red Letter Shakespeare series, c.
    The name for this small, modestly priced set derives from its two-color printing with character names in red. Between the introduction and the play, each volume had a graceful black ornament with a red oval.
  • Leonetto Capiello, Cinzano poster

    Leonetto Capiello, Cinzano poster
    Capiello's posters consistently display a joyful and exuberant energy.
  • Leopoldo Metlicovitz, Calzaturificio di Varese poster

    Leopoldo Metlicovitz, Calzaturificio di Varese poster
    This classic Metlicovitz poster exudes an optimistic elegance.
  • . Edward Johnston, Johnston's Railway Type

    . Edward Johnston, Johnston's Railway Type
    These elemental letterforms were prototypes for reductive design.
  • Period: to

    Alexey Brodovitch, photography by Herbert Matter, Harper's Bazaar cover, June 1940.

  • Paul Rand, cover for Direction magazine, December

     Paul Rand, cover for Direction magazine, December
    The red dots are symbolically ambiguous, becoming holiday decorations or blood drops.
  • Paul Rand, Jazzways yearbook cover,

    Paul Rand, Jazzways yearbook cover,
    Collage technique, elemental symbolic forms, and dynamic composition characterized Rand's work in the late 1930s and 1940s.
  • Paul Rand, Ohrbach's advertisement,

     Paul Rand, Ohrbach's advertisement,
    A combination of elements—logotype, photograph, decorative drawing, and type—are playfully unified
  • Paul Rand, cover for Thoughts on Design

    Paul Rand, cover for Thoughts on Design
    A photogram, with several exposures of an abacus placed on photographic paper in the darkroom, becomes a metaphor of the design process—moving elements around to compose space—and provides a visual record of the process.
  • Paul Rand, poster for the American Institute of Graphic Art,

     Paul Rand, poster for the American Institute of Graphic Art,
    A red “A. I. G. A.” plays hide-and-seek against the green background, as a pictographic clown face does the same with an organic abstraction.
  • Handbill for an excursion train

    Handbill for an excursion train
    To be bolder than bold, the compositor used heavier letterforms for the initial letter of important words. Oversized terminal letterforms combine with condensed and extended styles in the phrase Maryland Day!
  • Fremont rock painting from San Raphael Swell, c. 2000–1000 BCE.

    Fremont rock painting from San Raphael Swell, c. 2000–1000 BCE.
    The presence of what appear to be spear marks in the sides of some of these animal images indicates that they were used in magical rites designed to gain power over animals and success in the hunt.
  • The Riverside Print Company of Milwaukee, poster for C. W. Parker Company's Carry-Us-All portable carousels, undated

    The Riverside Print Company of Milwaukee, poster for C. W. Parker Company's Carry-Us-All portable carousels, undated
    Parker's carousels, manufactured in Kansas, were very popular in Midwestern nomadic carnivals.
  • The Modernist Era: Graphic design in the first half of the twentieth century

    The Modernist Era: Graphic design in the first half of the twentieth century
  • Package designs chromolithographed on tin for food and tobacco products

     Package designs chromolithographed on tin for food and tobacco products
    used bright flat colors, elaborate lettering, and iconic images to create an emblematic presence for the product.