french and indian war timeline

Timeline created by alex the scar
  • George Washington creating Ft. Necessity

    George Washington creating Ft. Necessity
    On June 4, 1754, during the Seven Years' War, a 22-year-old lieutenant colonel in the Virginia militia named George Washington begins construction of a makeshift Fort Necessity. One month later, the French, led by Jumonville's half-brother, won Washington's surrender and forced confession to Jumonville's murder. Washington had been sent to demand France's evacuation of the area and to engage the French forces in battle if necessary.
  • Washington defeated at Great Meadows

    Washington defeated at Great Meadows
    Let us know. Battle of Fort Necessity, also called the Battle of the Great Meadows, one of the earliest skirmishes of the French and Indian War and the only battle George Washington ever surrendered.The Battle of Fort Necessity (also called the Battle of the Great Meadows) took place on July 3, 1754, in what is now Farmington in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. The engagement, along with the May 28 skirmish known as the Battle of Jumonville Glen.
  • Johnson victory at Lake George

    Johnson victory at Lake George
    The Battle of Lake George was fought on 8 September 1755, in the north of the Province of New York. The battle was part of a campaign by the British to expel the French from North America, in the French and Indian War.The battle consisted of three separate phases and ended in victory for the British and their allies.
  • the massacre at Ft. William Henry,

    the massacre at Ft. William Henry,
    Fort William Henry, located at the south end of Lake George in New York, was the northern-most outpost of British soldiers in the interior of colonial America. This small frontier fort was extemely vulnerable to attack from French and Native American forces.In one of the most notorious incidents of the French and Indian War, Montcalm's Indian allies violated the agreed terms of surrender and attacked the British column, which had been deprived of ammunition, as it left the fort.
  • Amherst takes Louisbourg

    Amherst takes Louisbourg
    The siege of Louisbourg cost Amherst 172 killed and 355 wounded, while the French suffered 102 killed, 303 wounded, and the remainder taken prisoner. In addition, four French warships were burned and one captured. The victory at Louisbourg opened the way for the British to campaign up the St.
  • Battle of Fort Frontenac

    Battle of Fort Frontenac
    The Battle of Fort Frontenac took place on August 26–28, 1758 during the Seven Years' War (referred to as the French and Indian War in the United States) between France and Great Britain. The location of the battle was Fort Frontenac, a French fort and trading post which is located at the site of present-day Kingston, Ontario, at the eastern end of Lake Ontario where it drains into the St. Lawrence River.
  • The British captured Montreal ending the conflict in North America.

    The British captured Montreal ending the conflict in North America.
    On September 8, 1760, Montreal surrendered to the British, and with the Treaty of Paris in 1763 New France was officially ceded to Britain.He was however overruled by Pierre François de Rigaud, Marquis de Vaudreuil-Cavagnal, the civilian Governor of French Canada who persuaded him to surrender. Lévis attempted to negotiate a surrender with the honours of war, but the British rejected such terms and the French authorities eventually agreed to an unconditional surrender.
  • William Pitt leading the British

    William Pitt leading the British
    Pitt was a member of the British cabinet and its informal leader from 1756 to 1761 (with a brief interlude in 1757), during the Seven Years' War (including the French and Indian War in the American colonies). He again led the ministry, holding the official title of Lord Privy Seal, between 1766 and 1768.Pitt is best known as the wartime political leader of Britain in the Seven Years' War, especially for his single-minded devotion to victory over France.
  • British victory at Fort. Beauséjour (Nova Scotia)

    British victory at Fort. Beauséjour (Nova Scotia)
    The Battle of Fort Beausejour was fought on the Isthmus of Chignecto and marked the end of Father Le Loutre's War and the opening of a British offensive in the Acadia and Nova Scotia theatre of the Seven Years' War, which would eventually lead to the end of the French Empire in North America.Since 1920 the site has been designated as a National Historic Site of Canada, named the Fort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland National Historic Site.
  • Siege of Québec begins

    Siege of Québec begins
    Beginning on December 8, 1775, Colonel Benedict Arnold and General Richard Montgomery lead an American force in the siege of Quebec. The Americans hoped to capture the British-occupied city and with it win support for the American cause in Canada.
    Montgomery's army had captured Montreal on November 13, and early in December they became one force that was led by Arnold, whose men had made an arduous trek through the wilderness of northern New England.