Fred Korematsu- AAS 100 uiuc

By aas100
  • Fred Korematsu was born in Oakland, California

    Fred Korematsu was born in Oakland, California
    He was the third of four sons born into his immediate family. His parents were two Japanese immigrants, which made him a “Nisei”, which is when a Japanese American is the first generation to be born in America. Upon arrival in America, Korematsu’s parents opened a floral nursery business in their hometown. At home, Japanese was the main language spoken and many Japanese holidays were still celebrated. However, Fred and his brothers enjoyed many hobbies, like tennis, basketball, and football. Fre
  • Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Attack on Pearl Harbor
    The Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.
  • Enlisting (and being rejected) from the military

    Enlisting (and being rejected) from the military
    As the US entered World War II, Korematsu wanted to get involved. He tried enlisting in the National Guard and the Coast guard. Korematsu was rejected by the military officers right away because they discriminated him for his Japanese ancestry
  • Worked as a shipyard welder

    Worked as a shipyard welder
    After this, Korematsu became a shipyard welder at docks in Oakland. Eventually, he was promoted to foreman of the welders. One day, Korematsu received an unexpected notice to report to the Union Office. Here, he was fired again due to his Japanese ancestry
  • Executive Order 9066 Passed

    Executive Order 9066 Passed
    Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 allowing the Secretary of War to detain Japanese-Americans in internment camps
  • Every Korematsu family member went to the Tanforan Assembly Center to be relocated

    Every Korematsu family member went to the Tanforan Assembly Center to be relocated
    Fred decided to stay with his Italian-American girlfriend. To disguise himself from the police and military, Fred changed his name to Clyde Sarah and claimed to be of Spanish and Hawaiian descent. He also received minor plastic surgery on his eyes to look “less Japanese”.
  • Fred Korematsu was Arrested

    Fred Korematsu was Arrested
    Fred Korematsu was arrested on a street corner and taken to San Francisco county jail. On June 12, 1942, Korematsu had his trial date and was given $5,000 bail. After Fred's bail was posted, he and his lawyer, Besig, tried to leave, but we're met by Military Police.
  • Korematsu convicted in federal court

    Korematsu convicted in federal court
    He and his family were placed in the Central Utah War Relocation Center and he was put to workin the horse stalls as an unskilled laborer. Korematsu was also put on five year probation.
  • Appealed all the way to the Supreme Court and lost 6-3

    Appealed all the way to the Supreme Court and lost 6-3
  • Executive Order 9066 is recinded

    Executive Order 9066 is recinded
  • Little Boy

    Little Boy
    Bomb dropped over Hiroshima
  • Fat Man

    Fat Man
    Imploding atomic bomb dropped over Nagasaki.
  • Moved to Detriot & married wife Kathryn

    Moved to Detriot & married wife Kathryn
  • Moved to California to raise children Karen and Ken

    Moved to California to raise children Karen and Ken
  • Comission on wartime Relocation and Internment of Cilvilians (CWRIC) opens investigation

  • Korematsu's conviction overturned

  • President Reagan signed a offical apology and compensation bill for Japanese Americans

    President Reagan signed a offical apology and compensation bill for Japanese Americans
    Fred went to Washinton DC and helped to pass a bill that would grant an official apology from the US government and a token compensation of $20,000 to each surviving Japanese American that incarcerated.
    On August 10, 1988, President Regan signed the bill into law.
  • Presidential Medal of Freedom

    Presidential Medal of Freedom
    Korematsu recieved the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Bill Clinton.The award is the nation's highest civilian honor. He also spoke at many universities all over the US. He spoke about his experience at Berkeley, Stanford, Georgetown, University of Michigan, Harvard, and Yale.
  • 9/11

    9/11
  • "Friend of the Court" amicus briefs

    "Friend of the Court" amicus briefs
    Korematsu filed 2 amicus briefs with the Supreme Court in 2003 on behalf of Muslim inmates at Guantanamo Bay: Shafiq Rasul, v. George W. Bush and Khaled A.F. Al Odah v. United States of America. In both cases, he reminded the Court that their extreme measures were similar to those of the past with the internment camps.
  • Another amicus brief put in front of the Supreme Court

    Another amicus brief put in front of the Supreme Court
    Korematsu filed a case on behalf of an American Muslim man who was held in solitary confinement in a US military prison without trial.
  • Korematsu's response to Donald Rumsfeld v. Jose Padilla

    Korematsu's response to Donald Rumsfeld v. Jose Padilla
    Another amicus brief involving the Donald Rumsfeld v. Jose Padilla case, Korematsu wrote about the similarity of his unlawful detainment with Jose Padilla's situation. Korematsu wrote to remind the American government that they may be repeating their mistakes of the past. Korematsu believed that, "full vindication for the Japanese Americans will arrive only when we learn that, even in times of crisis; we must guard against prejudice and keep uppermost our commitment to law and justice.”
  • Korematsu Dies

    Korematsu Dies
    Korematsu died of respiratory failure at the age of 86. Hundreds of people came to his service at Oakland, California.
  • Fred Korematsu Day

    Fred Korematsu Day
    In 2010, the state of California made January 30 Fred Korematsu's Day. This is the first day in the US named after an Asian American.