EdTech

Timeline created by 66pasa06
  • -65 BCE

    What is EdTech

    What is EdTech
    EdTech, or education technology encompasses everything from the simple use of computers to teach maths and reading to children in elementary schools by Stanford University professors in the Sixties, to the submission of homework online, entire online degree platforms, informal mobile learning applications, gamification or virtual reality techniques.
  • -50 BCE

    1.Oral communication

    1.Oral communication
    One of the earliest means of formal teaching was oral – though human speech – although over time, technology has been increasingly used to facilitate or ‘back-up’ oral communication. In ancient times, stories, folklore, histories and news were transmitted and maintained through oral communication, making accurate memorization a critical skill, and the oral tradition is still the case in many aboriginal cultures.
  • -7 BCE

    2. Written Communication

    2. Written Communication
    The role of text or writing in education also has a long history. Moses used chiseled stone to convey the ten commandments in a form of writing, probably around the 7th century BC. Even though Socrates is reported to have railed against the use of writing, written forms of communication make analytic, lengthy chains of reasoning and argument much more accessible, reproducible without distortion, and thus more open to analysis and critique than the transient nature of speech.
  • 3.Broadcasting and video

    3.Broadcasting and video
    The first adult education radio broadcast from the BBC in 1924 was a talk on Insects in Relation to Man, and in the same year, J.C. Stobart, the new Director of Education at the BBC, mused about ‘a broadcasting university’ in the journal Radio Times (Robinson, 1982). Television was first used in education in the 1960s, for schools and for general adult education (one of the six purposes in the current BBC’s Royal Charter is still ‘promoting education and learning’).
  • 4.1.Computer-based learning

    4.1.Computer-based learning
    In essence the development of programmed learning aims to computerize teaching, by structuring information, testing learners’ knowledge, and providing immediate feedback to learners, without human intervention other than in the design of the hardware and software and the selection and loading of content and assessment questions. B.F. Skinner started experimenting with teaching machines that made use of programmed learning
  • 4.2.Computer networking

    4.2.Computer networking
    Arpanet in the U.S.A was the first network to use the Internet protocol in 1982. In the late 1970s, Murray Turoff and Roxanne Hiltz at the New Jersey Institute of Technology were experimenting with blended learning, using NJIT’s internal computer network. They combined classroom teaching with online discussion forums, and termed this ‘computer-mediated communication’ or CMC (Hiltz and Turoff, 1978).
  • 4.3.Online learning environments

    4.3.Online learning environments
    Web enabled the development of the first learning management systems (LMSs), such as WebCT (which later became Blackboard). LMSs provide an online teaching environment, where content can be loaded and organized, as well as providing ‘spaces’ for learning objectives, student activities, assignment questions, and discussion forums. The first fully online courses (for credit) started to appear in 1995.
  • 4.Connecting the world

    4.Connecting the world
    Marc Andreesen is the original developer of Mosaic, the first browser software able to read HTML.He also the founder of Netscape Communications.
  • 6.Social media

    6.Social media
    Social media are really a sub-category of computer technology, but their development deserves a section of its own in the history of educational technology. Social media cover a wide range of different technologies, including blogs, wikis, You Tube videos, mobile devices such as phones and tablets, Twitter, Skype and Facebook
  • 7.A paradigm shift

    7.A paradigm shift
    There are some useful lessons to be learned from past developments in the use of technology for education, in particular that many claims made for a newly emerging technology are likely to be neither true nor new. Also new technology rarely completely replaces an older technology. Usually the old technology remains, operating within a more specialised ‘niche’, such as radio, or integrated as part of a richer technology environment, such as video in the Internet.
  • Referances

    Referances
    pixabay.com
    www.slideshare.net
    opentextbc.ca
    technologyforlearners.com