civil rights movement

Timeline created by merandah
In History
  • plessy vs. ferguson

    plessy vs. ferguson
    was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court that upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality, a doctrine that came to be known as "separate but equal".
  • integration of major league baseball

    integration of major league baseball
    Jim Crow policies of baseball changed forever when Branch Rickey and Jackie Robinson of the Negro League's Kansas City Monarchs agreed to a contract that would bring Robinson into the major leagues in 1947.
  • integration of the armed forces

    integration of the armed forces
    President Harry S. Truman signed this executive order establishing the President's Committee on Equality of Treatment and Opportunity in the Armed Services, committing the government to integrating the segregated military.
  • supreme court decision of brown v. board of educationd

    supreme court decision of brown v. board of educationd
    a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that U.S. state laws establishing racial segregation in public schools are unconstitutional, even if the segregated schools are otherwise equal in quality
  • death of emmitt till

    death of emmitt till
    On August 28, 1955, while visiting family in Money, Mississippi, 14-year-old Emmett Till, an African American from Chicago, is brutally murdered for allegedly flirting with a white woman
  • Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Montgomery Bus Boycott
    The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a political and a social protest campaign against the policy of racial segregation on the public transit system of Montgomery, Alabama. It was a seminal event in the civil rights movement in the United States.
  • Integration of Little Rock high school

    Integration of Little Rock high school
    The Little Rock Nine was a group of nine African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. Their enrollment was followed by the Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Orval Faubus, the Governor of Arkansas.
  • Civil Rights Act Of 1957

    Civil Rights Act Of 1957
    The Civil Rights Act of 1957 was the first federal civil rights legislation passed by the United States Congress since the Civil Rights Act of 1875. The bill was passed by the 85th United States Congress and signed into law by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on September 9, 1957.
  • The Greenhouse Four Lunch Counter Sit-In

    The Greenhouse Four Lunch Counter Sit-In
    The Greensboro sit-in was a civil rights protest that started in 1960, when young African American students staged a sit-in at a segregated Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, and refused to leave after being denied service. The sit-in movement soon spread to college towns throughout the South.
  • The Freedom Rides by Freedom Riders of 1961

    The Freedom Rides by Freedom Riders of 1961
    Freedom Riders were civil rights activists who rode interstate buses into the segregated Southern United States in 1961 and subsequent years to challenge the non-enforcement of the United States Supreme Court decisions Morgan v. ... Virginia (1960), which ruled that segregated public buses were unconstitutional.
  • The Twenty-Fourth Amendment

    The Twenty-Fourth Amendment
    The Twenty-fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution prohibits both Congress and the states from conditioning the right to vote in federal elections on payment of a poll tax or other types of tax.
  • The Integregation of the University of Mississippi

    The Integregation of the University of Mississippi
    On September 30, 1962, riots erupted on the campus of the University of Mississippi in Oxford where locals, students, and committed segregationists had gathered to protest the enrollment of James Meredith, a black Air Force veteran attempting to integrate the all-white school.
  • intregation of the university of Alabama by Vivian Malone & James A. Hood

    intregation of the university of Alabama by Vivian Malone & James A. Hood
    On a scorching June day in 1963, James Hood and Vivian Malone became the first two black students to enroll successfully at the University of Alabama, defying Gov. George C. Wallace Jr.'s symbolic — and vitriolic — “stand in the schoolhouse door.”
  • The March on Washington & " I Have A Dream" Speech by MLK

    The March on Washington & " I Have A Dream" Speech by MLK
    Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered this iconic ‘I Have a Dream’ speech at the March on Washington on August 28, 1963.
  • The Assassination of JFK in Dallas, Tx

    The Assassination of JFK in Dallas, Tx
    John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. Central Standard Time in Dallas, Texas, while riding in a presidential motorcade through Dealey Plaza.
  • The civil rights Act of 1964 signed by president johnson

    The civil rights Act of 1964 signed by president johnson
    This act, signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson on July 2, 1964, prohibited discrimination in public places, provided for the integration of schools and other public facilities, and made employment discrimination illegal. This document was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction
  • the assassination of Malcome X

    Malcolm X was an African American Muslim minister and human rights activist who was a popular figure during the civil rights movement. He is best known for his time spent as a vocal spokesman for the Nation of Islam
  • The Selma to Montgomery March: "Bloody Sunday"

    The Selma to Montgomery March: "Bloody Sunday"
    On "Bloody Sunday," March 7, 1965, some 600 civil rights marchers headed east out of Selma on U.S. Route 80. They got only as far as the Edmund Pettus Bridge six blocks away, where state and local lawmen attacked them with billy clubs and tear gas and drove them back into Selma
  • The Voting Rights Act of 1965

    The Voting Rights Act of 1965
    This act was signed into law on August 6, 1965, by President Lyndon Johnson. It outlawed the discriminatory voting practices adopted in many southern states after the Civil War, including literacy tests as a prerequisite to voting.
  • The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee

    The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee
    Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr., an African-American clergyman and civil rights leader, was fatally shot at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, at 6:01 p.m. CST. He was rushed to St. Joseph's Hospital, where he died at 7:05 p.m.
  • The votes rights act of 1968

    The votes rights act of 1968
    a landmark law in the United States signed into law by United States President Lyndon B. ... The 1968 act expanded on previous acts and prohibited discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, and since 1974