Screen shot 2019 10 27 at 9.56.20 pm

British Legislation, Colonial Relations, and Road to Revolution

  • The Proclamation of 1763

    The Proclamation of 1763
    *British-Native American relations
    The main purpose of the Proclamation of 1763 was to limited the flow of European settlers onto Native American lands so that Britain could avoid any more conflict with the Native Americans. The events that took place in 1763 were a turning point for Colonial- British relations because after the war Britain started to try to regain authority in the colonies; however, this challenged an American identity and liberties that had already developed.
  • End of French and Indian War/ The Peace of Paris 1763

    End of French and Indian War/ The Peace of Paris 1763
    The Peace of Paris resulted in the end of the French and Indian War and the almost complete elimination of France in the colonies; therefore, Britain became the colonial superpower. However, the impacts of Britain's victory on the colonies was difficult; salutary neglect came to an end challenging the newly developed American identity, and Britain's new policies to collect money to pay off their war debt greatly effected the colonies.
    *Colonial-British/ British-Native American relations
  • End of Salutary Neglect

    End of Salutary Neglect
    The end of the French and Indian War ended a period of salutary neglect. From 1763 to the start of the American Revolution in 1775 Britain tried to regain control and impose its laws, regulations, and taxes upon the colonies.
    *Colonial-British relations
  • Pontiac's Rebellion

    Pontiac's Rebellion
    Pontiac's Rebellion took place because the Native Americans, specifically those in the Ohio Valley region, did not want to give up their land to European settlers after the French and Indian War. This event sparked the enactment of the Proclamation of 1763, in order to help relations between the Native Americans and the British.
    *Native American- British relations
  • The Currency Act of 1764

    The Currency Act of 1764
    The Currency Act of 1764 prohibited the distribution of paper money in the colonies. This effected farm owners that used paper money to pay for their land. It also threatened the stability of the economy in the colonies; therefore, this act caused many financial problems and made the colonists very unhappy.
  • The Sugar Act of 1764

    The Sugar Act of 1764
    The Sugar Act of 1764 was the first revenue-raising tax Britain imposed on the colonies following the end of the French and Indian War in order to help pay for the war debt Britain had incurred. The act taxed sugar and molasses as well as other products like textiles and indigo. The act was aimed at ending the smuggling trade of sugar and molasses that had developed between the colonies and the French and Dutch West Indies during the period of salutary neglect.
  • The Quartering Act of 1765

    The Quartering Act of 1765
    The Quartering Act of 1765 stated that the colonists had to house and provide provisions for the British military. This act caused colonists to become increasingly angry at Britain not because they had to house its soldiers during a time of peace, rather they had to pay even more taxes on provisions and housing for the soldiers.
  • The Stamp Act of 1765

    The Stamp Act of 1765
    The Stamp Act of 1765 was another revenue-producing act that required all paper products in the colonies to be printed on taxed paper embossed with a revenue seal. This encompassed publications, legal documents, newspapers, playing cards, etc. Once again colonists became angry with Britain because they believed that they were being taxed unfairly and without representation.
  • The Declaratory Act

    The Declaratory Act
    The Declaratory Act was passed by Parliament when the Stamp Act was repealed. The act stated that Britain had the same right to tax in the colonies as they did in Britain. Colonist worried that this would allow Britain to impose more taxes in the colonies
  • Townshend Acts 1767/1768

    Townshend Acts 1767/1768
    The Townshend Acts imposed taxes on paper, lead, paint, tea, and glass. Also, it set up a Customs Board in Boston to collect taxes and created new courts of law to prosecute smugglers. Also, it gave British authorities the right to search homes and businesses. Again, colonist were upset that Parliament was imposing more taxes and regulations on them, as well as taking away certain privacies and freedoms they believed they possessed.
  • The Circular Letter by Samuel Adams

    The Circular Letter by Samuel Adams
    The Circular Letter argue that Britain did not have the right to tax the colonies because the colonies were not represented in Parliament. It stated that the imposition of taxes on the colonies was unconstitutional and violated the colonists' rights.
  • The Boston Massacre

    The Boston Massacre
    The Boston Massacre took place on March 5, 1770 on King Street. The conflict started between one British soldier and a group of colonists but quickly escalated and resulted in a bloody slaughter. Patriots such as Samuel Adams and Paul Revere used the event as a way to rally support for the revolutionary effort in the colonies.
  • The Tea Act of 1773

    The Tea Act of 1773
    This act was not intended to raise revenue to pay Britain's debts, rather it was to help the East India Company out of financial trouble. The act granted the East India Company a monopoly on tea sales in the colonies; however, colonists still didn't appreciate having to pay taxes on tea which was a popular drink in the colonies.
  • The Molasses Act of 1773

    The Molasses Act of 1773
    The Molasses Act of 1773 imposed a tax on molasses imported from non-British colonies. This act was not received well in the colonies. Many colonists protested that the British West Indies didn't produce enough molasses to supply all of the colonies.Moreover, the act was very ineffective because merchants would smuggle molasses to the colonies.
  • Committees of Correspondence

    Committees of Correspondence
    The Committees of Correspondence were set up in Virginia, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and South Carolina. They were established with the goal of sharing ideas and information and maintaining communication between the colonies about British policies/taxes and their plans to oppose them.
  • The Boston Tea Party

    The Boston Tea Party
    The Boston Tea Party was a political protest led by the Sons of Liberty. Colonists were angry that they were being taxed without representation in Parliament, so in response they dumped 342 chests of tea into the Boston Harbor.
  • The Intolerable Acts

    The Intolerable Acts
    After the Boston Tea Party the Intolerable Acts were passed as punishment for the colonists that protested. They were a series of laws passed by Parliament that restricted the freedom of the colonies.The five acts were the Boston Port Act, the Massachusetts Government Act, the Administration Justice Act, the Quartering Act, and the Quebec Act.
  • The Massachusetts Government Act

    The Massachusetts Government Act
    The Massachusetts Government Act repealed the colony's charter and cancel its constitution. Moreover, town meetings were restricted and the royally-appointed governor was given most of the power. This act worried the other colonies because they did not want Britain to do this to them and they also believed that it gave too much power to the officials.
  • The Administration of Justice Act

    The Administration of Justice Act
    The Administration of Justice Act ensured fair trails for British officials accused of committing capital offenses while enforcing the law of putting down protests in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • The Quebec Act

    The Quebec Act
    The Quebec Act was passed by Parliament and it established a permanent government in Canada. Colonists did not like this because they saw this act as another way Britain was regaining control over North America.
  • The First Continental Congress

    The First Continental Congress
    In reaction to the Coercive Acts, delegates from 12 of the 13 colonies that became the United States met and created and signed the Continental Association, which called for a boycott of of British goods.
  • The New England Restraining Act

    The New England Restraining Act
    This act was passed by Parliament as punishment for the colonists that were boycotting British goods. The act only allowed the New England colonies to trade with Britain or the British West Indies and later banned colonists from fishing in the North Atlantic.
  • "Liberty or Death" Speech- Patrick Henry

    "Liberty or Death" Speech- Patrick Henry
    Patrick Henry's speech was given at the Virginia Convention in order to convinced delegates to secede from Britain. He emphasized the fact to it is important to fight of the truth and that he would rather die than be a slave to British rule.
    -I believe it was around this time that war and independence for the colonies became inevitable. I don't think turning back was an option because there was enough colonial support for independence after all of the unfair taxation that Britain had imposed.
  • The Midnight Ride

    The Midnight Ride
    Paul Revere and William Dawes made the midnight ride from Boston to Lexington, taking two different routes. Their job was to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams of the 700 British troops that were on their way to arrest them.
  • The Battle of Concord/ The Shot Heard Round the World

    The Battle of Concord/ The Shot Heard Round the World
    The Battle of Lexington and Concord was the first military interaction of the American Revolutionary War. The battle resulted in an American victory and caused the British to retreat back to Boston.