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Between the Wars

  • Social Darwinism

    Social Darwinism
    which claim to apply biological concepts of natural selection and survival of the fittest to sociology and politics
  • Frances Willard

    Frances Willard
    In 1874, Willard participated in the creation of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) where she was elected the first corresponding secretary.[4] That same year, she was invited to become the President of the Chicago WCTU and accepted the position
  • Tin Pan Alley

    Tin Pan Alley
    the name given to the collection of New York City music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. The name originally referred to a specific place: West 28th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue in Manhattan
  • Jazz Music

    Jazz Music
    a genre of music that originated from African American communities of New Orleans in the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It emerged in the form of independent traditional music and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African American and European American musical parentage with a performance orientation
  • Henry Ford

    Henry Ford
    an American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and the sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production
  • Federal Reserve system

    is the central banking system of the United States. It was created on December 23, 1913, with the enactment of the Federal Reserve Act, largely in response to a series of financial panics
  • Marcus Garvey

    Marcus Garvey
    an orator for the Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism movements, to which end he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League
  • Prohibition

    Prohibition
    the act of prohibiting the manufacturing, storage in barrels or bottles, transportation, sale, possession, and consumption of alcohol including alcoholic beverages.
  • William J Bryan

    William J Bryan
    Bryan opposed the Darwinian theory of evolution for two reasons. First, he believed that what he considered a materialistic account of the descent of man through evolution undermined the Bible. Second, he considered Darwinism as applied to society to be a great evil force in the world, promoting hatred and conflicts, especially the World War.
  • Warren G. Harding's

    Warren G. Harding's
    Return to normalcy, a return to the way of life before World War I, was United States presidential candidate Warren G. Harding's campaign promise in the election of 1920.
  • Harlem Renaissance

    Harlem Renaissance
    The Harlem Renaissance was the name given to the cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem between the end of World War I and the middle of the 1930s
  • tea pot dome scandal

    tea pot dome scandal
    a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1921 to 1922, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding. Secretary of the Interior Albert Bacon Fall had leased Navy petroleum reserves at Teapot Dome in Wyoming and two other locations in California to private oil companies at low rates without competitive bidding. In 1922 and 1923, the leases became the subject of a sensational investigation by Senator Thomas J. Walsh. Fall was later convicted of accepting bribes from
  • Langston Hughes

    Langston Hughes
    "The Negro Speaks of Rivers", which became Hughes's signature poem, was collected in his first book of poetry The Weary Blues (1926)
  • Clarence Darrow

    Clarence Darrow
    Darrow defended John T. Scopes in the State of Tennessee v. Scopes trial. It has often been called the "Scopes Monkey Trial," a title popularized by author and journalist H.L. Mencken. The trial pitted Darrow against William Jennings Bryan in an American court case that tested the Butler Act, which had been passed on March 21, 1925. The act forbade the teaching of "the Evolution Theory" in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee.
  • Scopes Monkey trial

    Scopes Monkey trial
    The trial of John Scopes, a high school teacher in Tennessee, for teaching the theory of evolution in violation of state law. The trial was held in 1925
  • Charles A. Lindbergh

    Charles A. Lindbergh
    Lindbergh, Charles Augustus (1902-1974), an American aviator, made the first solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean on May 20-21, 1927.
  • Stock Market Crash

    Stock Market Crash
    Black Tuesday hits Wall Street as investors trade 16,410,030 shares on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors, and stock tickers ran hours behind because the machinery could not handle the tremendous volume of trading. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression
  • The GReat depression

    The GReat depression
    The Great Depression (1929-39) was the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world. In the United States, the Great Depression began soon after the stock market crash of October 1929, which sent Wall Street into a panic and wiped out millions of investors.
  • 20th amendment

    20th amendment
    The 20th amendment is a simple amendment that sets the dates at which federal (United States) government elected offices end. In also defines who succeeds the president if the president dies
  • TVA

    he Tennessee Valley Authority (T.V.A.) is a federally owned corporation in the United States created by congressional charter in May 1933 to provide navigation, flood control, electricity generation, fertilizer manufacturing, and economic development in the Tennessee Valley, a region particularly affected by the Great Depression
  • the new deal

    the new deal
    A group of government programs and policies established under President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1930s; the New Deal was designed to improve conditions for persons suffering in the Great Depression.
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Franklin D. Roosevelt
    Roosevelt's "First 100 Days" concentrated on the first part of his strategy: immediate relief. From March 9 to June 16, 1933, he sent Congress a record number of bills, all of which passed easily. To propose programs, Roosevelt relied on leading Senators such as George Norris, Robert F. Wagner, and Hugo Black, as well as his Brain Trust of academic advisers. Like Hoover, he saw the Depression caused in part by people no longer spending or investing because they were afraid
  • FDIC

    an independent agency of the United States (U.S.) federal government that preserves public confidence in the banking system by insuring deposits
  • 21st amendment

    repeals the 18th amendments (prohibition of alcohol
  • SEC

    a U.S. government agency that oversees securities transactions, activities of financial professionals and mutual fund trading to prevent fraud and intentional deception
  • the dust bowl

    the dust bowl
    an area of land where vegetation has been lost and soil reduced to dust and eroded, especially as a consequence of drought or unsuitable farming practice
  • SSA

    an independent agency of the United States federal government that administers Social Security, a social insurance program consisting of retirement, disability, and survivors' benefits
  • Dorothea Lange

    Dorothea Lange
    an influential American documentary photographer and photojournalist, best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA). Lange's photographs humanized the consequences of the Great Depression and influenced the development of documentary photography
  • Relief, Recovery, and Reform

    Relief, Recovery, and Reform
    Relief - Immediate action taken to halt the economies deterioration.
  • The Great migration

    The Great migration
    The Great Migration was the movement of 6 million blacks out of the rural Southern United States to the urban Northeast, Midwest, and West that occurred between 1910 and 1970
  • Red scare

    Red scare
    A Red Scare is the promotion of fear of a potential rise of communism or radical leftism. In the United States, the First Red Scare was about worker (socialist) revolution and political radicalism
  • Eleanor Roosevelt

    served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.[2][3] President Harry S. Truman later called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements.