Timeline of Lake Forest History

Timeline created by lflbhistory
In History
  • Treaty of Greenville

    The Treaty of Greenville is signed. The U.S. takes over Native American land including the future site of downtown Chicago.
  • The Indiana Territory is created

    The United States Congress approves legislation which creates the Indiana Territory, encompassing Illinois. The act is put into effect on July 4, 1800.
  • Fort Dearborn built

    American troops build and occupy Fort Dearborn, on the site of Chicago. Governor Harrison concludes a treaty with the Kaskaskia Indians at Vincennes, by which their claim to all land in the Illinois Country, except a small area around Kaskaskia, is relinquished.
  • In 1810...

    The population of Illinois is 12,262.
  • Illinois becomes a territory of the second grade

    Illinois becomes a territory of the second grade, with suffrage for all white males age 21 and older who pay taxes and have lived in the territory for more than a year.
  • First Governor of Illinois

    First Governor of Illinois
    Shadrach Bond is inaugurated as the first Governor of Illinois.
  • Illinois admitted to the union

    llinois is admitted to the union as the 21st state.
  • Population of Illinois

    The population of Illinois is 55,211.
  • Population of Illinois

    The population of Illinois is 157,445.
  • Cook County founded

    Cook County is founded. The new county includes what is present day Lake, McHenry, DuPage, Kankakee, Iroquois and Will counties.
  • Green Bay Road established

    Green Bay Military Road appears as a blazed trail after a 1832 act of Congress establishes the trail as an official post road from Fort Dearborn, Chicago to Fort Howard, Wisconsin. The 500- mile roundtrip journey takes one month on foot to complete in winter.
  • The Treaty of Chicago

    The Treaty of Chicago is signed, ceding Native American land in Illinois to the U.S. Government. The treaty is not proclaimed until February 21, 1835 and the Native Americans are allowed to remain in the Territory until August 1836 (Halsey, 1912, p. 462).
  • First homes built in the Lake Forest area

    Michael Meehan builds his homestead near Old Telegraph Road (Waukegan Rd), the first in the area.
    John Strong and his wife Elizabeth build their cabin near Green Bay Military Road (Halsey 1912, p.463). Otis and Sarah Hinkley build their home at what is now the center of Lake Forest at the corner of Green Bay Road and Deerpath Avenue, the first people to settle in the original Lake Forest plat. However, they moved to Waukegan before Lake Forest is incorporated (Halsey, 1912, p. 12 and Arpee,19)
  • First stage coaches

    The first stagecoaches follow old Green Bay Road.
  • Yore Cabin built

    Yore Cabin built
    Michael Yore arrives from Ireland and builds a log cabin near present-day Waukegan and Everett Roads.
  • Atteridge Cabin built

    Thomas Atteridge, of the Cole-Swanton-Atteridge extended family group, who are from Cork, Ireland, builds a log cabin on Green Bay Road in what will become Lake Forest (Halsey, 1912 p. 12).
  • William and Mary Dwyer open a tavern

    William and Mary Dwyer open a tavern
    William and Mary Dwyer open a tavern and stagecoach relay station along Green Bay Trail north of Lake Bluff. This is one of three such establishments in the Lake County area.
  • First judicial proceeding

    The first judicial proceeding in what will become Lake County takes place.
  • McHenry County founded

    McHenry County is created out of the northern part of Cook County by two acts of the General Assembly approved today and March 1. The new county included what is now Lake County (Halsey, 1912 p.461).
  • Swanton and Cunningham homes built

    A log cabin, the predecessor of the Swanton brick farmhouse built in the Greek Revival style, is constructed. It is perhaps Lake Forest’s oldest building (later it is incorporated into Shaw’s Barnhouse at 1260 N. Green Bay Road) since the probable 1837 Atteridge log house was moved to Crab Tree Farm, Lake Bluff, in 2005. William Cunningham builds a home on the bluffs near the foot of Deerpath and later opens the first school in the township in his house (Halsey, 1912 p. 469)
  • Lake County founded

    Lake County is founded through the division of McHenry County by an act of the General Assembly (Halsey, 1912 p.461).
  • Kerrigan house built

    Kerrigan house built
    A portion of the Kerrigan house, the only home within the original plat of Lake Forest that predates the plat, is built on present-day Sheridan Road around 1840.
  • Lake County seat moved to Little Fort

    The Lake County seat is moved from Libertyville to Little Fort (Waukegan). Later this year, a pier is built in Little Fort.
  • Courthouse built in Little Fort

    A courthouse is built in the new county seat, Little Fort (Waukegan) for $3,800.
  • St. Michael’s Church built

    St. Michael’s Church, one of the earliest Catholic churches in the state, is built on the west side of present-day Waukegan Road in West Deerfield Township (Everett).
  • Little Fort Porcupine & Democratic Banner published

    The first newspaper in the area is the Little Fort Porcupine & Democratic Banner, which is published for the first time today at Little Fort (Waukegan).
  • Emmet Post Office established

    The first post office in the area is established near present-day Waukegan Road and Route 60 – it is known as the Emmet Post Office (Halsey 1912 p. 479). Andrew Steel is the first Postmaster (Arpee 1964 p. 20).
  • First telegraph through Lake Forest

    The first telegraph line between Chicago and Milwaukee is built alongold Telegraph Road (Waukegan Rd.) in 1847. Today, the first telegraph message through Lake County is received in Chicago (Halsey 1912 p. 480).
  • Little Fort renamed Waukegan

    Little Fort is renamed Waukegan because the community no longer believes the word “little” is an accurate description of the town.
  • Shields Township created

    Shields Township created
    Shields Township is created as political and taxing unit. It is named for United States Senator James Shields of Illinois (Halsey, 1912 p. 474).
  • In 1850...

    In 1850, the population of Lake County is 14,226, frame buildings begin to replace log cabins, land is worth $5.00 an acre and five to six full stage coaches are running daily between Chicago and Waukegan.
  • First town meeting

    The first area town meeting is held at the house of Mary Dwyer (Halsey, 1912 p. 475).
  • The Illinois Central Railroad chartered

    The Illinois Central Railroad is chartered; it is completed in 1856.
  • St. Patrick Catholic Church established

    St. Patrick Catholic Church is established, on the east side of Waukegan Road near the intersection of Mellody Road.
  • First rail line through Lake County

    The first rail line running through Lake County, the present Northwestern Railroad, is finished. Five men, Rev. Harvey Curtis, Rev. Robert W. Patterson, Rev. Ira M. Weed, Rev. J.J. Slocum and D.R. Holt, take the new train north from Chicago and stop near Ryan Place (Farwell Crossing) and walk toward Lake Michigan. Struck by the natural beauty of the area they name it Lake Forest and select it as the site for a future Presbyterian university.
  • Northwestern University opens

    Northwestern University opens in Chicago.
  • Lake Forest Association organized

    The Lake Forest Association is organized in February at the Second Presbyterian Church in Chicago, and the stock company Lake Forest Association is founded. The association begins buying wooded lakefront property and funds are raised for schools or a university to be founded (Coventry, Meyer and Miller 2005, p. 38).
  • The Union Stock Yards open

    The Union Stock Yards open, helping to fuel Chicago’s moniker as the “hog butcher for the world.” It remains open until 1971.
  • Lake Forest platted

    Almerin Hotchkiss’ town plan plots Lake Forest in irregular lots within a park-like setting along the lake. Lake Forest Association shares, sold the previous year, are converted into lots, with every other lot assigned to the educational institution.
  • Lind University chartered

    Lind University chartered
    Lind University is chartered, underwritten by an $80,000 pledge of property from Sylvester Lind (pictured) with the understanding that another $100,000 will be raised by the Presbyterian community of Chicago. Lind’s gift is offered after the original investor was found to have made his money from distilling whiskey, thus making his contribution unwelcome (Schulze, Cowler and Miller 2000 p.15). Because of the Panic of 1857, most of these monetary pledges will ultimately not be made.
  • First hotel built; Lake Forest Academy opens

    First hotel built; Lake Forest Academy opens
    The first hotel in Lake Forest, later called Old Hotel or Clark Hotel, designed by Asher Carter, opens on what is now Triangle Park. It is Lake Forest’s first public building (Arpee, 1964 p. 41). Later that year, Lake Forest Academy opens in the hotel with four students, John C. Patterson, John Johnson, Ellery S. Miller, and William Atteridge. Samuel F. Miller is the Academy’s first principal (Arpee, 1964 p. 42).
  • The Presbyterian General Assembly visit Lake Forest

    The Presbyterian General Assembly and other citizens travel from Chicago to Lake Forest to visit the proposed site of Lind University. The party is addressed by William Bross (Chicago Daily Tribune 5-4-1858).
  • Visitors to Lake Forest

    Visitors to Lake Forest
    According to the Chicago Tribune, many wealthy residents of Chicago are contemplating building summer residences in Lake Forest. The paper also recommends a visit to Lake Forest for people who “desire to breath…free, pure air, and drink in the sweet influences of romantic natural scenery” (Chicago Tribune 9-10-1858).
  • Rossiter home built

    Rossiter home built
    The Gilbert Rossiter house, an Italianate villa, is constructed on Deerpath south of what is now Triangle Park for $1,200 (Arpee, 1964 p.54).
  • Dickinson’s Seminary for Young Ladies opens

    Dickinson’s Seminary for Young Ladies opens
    Rev. Baxter Dickinson opens Dickinson’s Seminary for Young Ladies with his four daughters as instructors. Board and tuition is $230 per year (Chicago Tribune 12-3-1859). The house is located just south of present day College Rd. and west of Sheridan Rd (Arpee, 1964 p.54).
  • Wright Store built

    The first business house in Lake Forest, the Wright store, is built on the northeast corner of Deerpath and McKinley.
  • Lind home built

    Lind home built
    The Sylvester Lind home is built on the northeast corner of Deerpath and Washington Road (Arpee, 1964, p. 54). The Lind home is reportedly used as a stop on the Underground Railroad (McClure).
  • Lake Forest Academy moves to new building

    Lake Forest Academy moves to new building
    A two story Lake Forest Academy building is finished enough to be occupied in January and the school moves out of the hotel. Tuition at Lake Forest Academy is $10 per term and board is $2 per week (Chicago Tribune 4-2-1859). A third story is added in 1866. College-level instruction begins on a tutorial basis in the fall in the Academy building, under the Rev. William C. Dickinson.
  • Quinlan estate built

    Quinlan estate built
    The first Lake Forest estate, the home of Dr. Charles H. Quinlan, later known as the Evergreens, is built on the north side of Deerpath in the Greek revival style. Dr. Quinlan is the first doctor in Chicago to use anesthetics (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 43).
  • Town meeting

    Lake Forest residents meet at the home of Sylvester Lind to discuss the possibility of organizing under Illinois State law. On the 17th of June residents meet at the Lake Forest Hotel to consider incorporation (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • First Post Office in Lake Forest

    A Post Office is established in Lake Forest with Samuel F. Miller, principal of Lake Forest Academy, as Postmaster (Halsey,1912 p.479).
  • First Presbyterian Church of Lake Forest is organized

    The First Presbyterian Church of Lake Forest is organized. The first worship service is held in the Academy Chapel and fourteen members are received into the church (Chakoian).
  • Holt house built

    Holt house built
    The Devillo R. Holt house, an Italianate villa called The Homestead, is constructed near the northwest corner of Sheridan and College Roads (570 N. Sheridan) for the Chicago lumber merchant and his wife, Ellen Hubbard Holt. Mrs. Holt is the sister-in-law of Chicago founder Gurdon Saltonstall Hubbard. The house is built from brick covered in clapboard (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 43).
  • First public school opened

    First public school opened
    The first public elementary school is opened at Walnut and Washington roads; 48 pupils attend classes in the new schoolhouse. The first teacher is Roxanna Ward Beecher, niece of the author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe (Arpee 1964 p. 61).
  • Abraham Lincoln visits Lake County

    Abraham Lincoln visits Lake County
    Lake County entertains a Springfield attorney named Abraham Lincoln (Arpee, 1963 p. 60). This pre-nomination visit in April may have included a train stop at Lake Forest to call on the Gilbert Rossiters. Mrs. Rossiter is the sister of Lincoln’s nominator, Norman B. Judd.
  • In 1860...

    People take the first steamboat excursion to Lake Forest. (Chicago Tribune 7-16-1860) Roads such as Deerpath, University (later Sheridan) and Westminster are graded and are set to be completed soon (Chicago Tribune 7-19-1860).
  • Lady Elgin sinks off coast of Highland Park

    The sidewheel steamer Lady Elgin is struck by the schooner Augusta on Lake Michigan off the coast of Highland Park. 103 passengers survive. The survivors that reach land in Winnetka are treated in houses along the shore that are turned into makeshift hospitals.
  • In 1861...

    Regular organized classes begin for the Collegiate Department of Lind University, with the Rev. William C. Dickinson and Samuel F. Miller, both Amherst College graduates, class of 1848, presiding. The first Lake Forest Academy commencement is held.
  • Thompson house built

    Thompson house built
    The Harvey M. Thompson house, an asymmetrical Italianate villa, is built on what is now Sheridan Road (660 N. Sheridan). The house’s most distinctive and irregular feature is a three-story octagonal tower. (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 43).
  • Harvey Thompson becomes mayor

    Harvey Thompson becomes mayor
    Harvey Thompson becomes the mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Anderson house built

    Scots-born James Anderson (1831-1919) builds a house on land he “bought with” the labor to clear and level University Park (today the Lake Forest College Middle Campus). The house is on the southwest corner of Western Avenue and Illinois Road.
  • The City of Lake Forest is chartered by the state legislature

    The City of Lake Forest is chartered by the state legislature
    The first ordinance approved by the City Council is “Be it ordained by the common council of the City of Lake Forest that no person elected to the office of Alderman of said city shall receive any salary for his services as Alderman.” The City seal is adopted by acting Mayor Harvey Thompson and the city council. The Seal incorporates the Latin phrase “Naturae et Scientiae Amor” which means “the love of nature and science.” (Lake Forester 7-31-1986).
  • First Presbyterian Church building built

    First Presbyterian Church building built
    The first wood-frame, American Gothic church building for First Presbyterian Church of Lake Forest is built (pictured). It is built on a lot across from the Academy building at a cost of $400 (Chakoian and First Presbyterian Church website).
  • Lake Forest students visit Camp Douglas

    Students from Lake Forest Academy and Lind University travel to<a href="http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/207.html" rel="nofollow"> Camp Douglas</a> to see rebel prisoners captured during the Civil War (Lake Forest College in the Loop, Miller 2010).
  • City buys school house

    The City of Lake Forest purchases the school house on the corner of Walnut and Washington (Lake Forester 7-27-1978).
  • In 1863...

    The Street Commission is instructed to “cut all thistles now growing in the streets within the City limits.” Lind University’s Collegiate Department disbands amidst the Civil War; the University is reduced to a boys’ preparatory program.
  • Samuel F. Miller becomes first public school superintendent

    Around 1864 Samuel F. Miller becomes the first superintendent of Lake Forest Public Schools after leaving Lake Forest Academy in 1862.
  • Lind University rechartered as Lake Forest University

    Lind University is rechartered as Lake Forest University, the name it was already known as informally. Due to the financial panic of 1857, Sylvester Lind was never able to follow through on his monetary pledge as benefactor.
  • William Sage Johnston Jr. becomes mayor of Lake Forest

    William Sage Johnston Jr. becomes mayor of Lake Forest
    William Sage Johnson Jr. becomes mayor of Lake Forest. Construction is completed on his Second Empire style home on Illinois Road, now the site of Gorton Community Center.
  • Lake Forest Academy boys accompany Lincoln’s funeral to Springfield

    Lake Forest Academy boys accompany Lincoln’s funeral to Springfield
    After Lincoln’s assassination in April 1865, Lake Forest Academy boys formerly trained by Col. Ellsworth (the boys are known as “Ellsworth Guards") meet Lincoln’s funeral train in Chicago and then accompany his body to its final rest in Springfield. Col. Ellsworth is pictured.
  • David J. Lake becomes mayor of Lake Forest

    David J. Lake becomes mayor of Lake Forest
  • African Methodist Episcopal Church organized

    The African Methodist Episcopal Church is organized.
  • Union Church founded

    The Rockland Union Church, later known simply as the Union Church, is created.
  • In 1867...

    Rev. Baxter Dickinson closes his Seminary for Young Ladies. Augustus Taylor opens the first meat market in Lake Forest (Arpee 1964 p. 81). Harvey M. Thompson becomes mayor of Lake Forest (2nd term).
  • First organized sports team

    The first organized sports team, a baseball team, is created at Lake Forest Academy (The Review, 2000).
  • Lake Forest Gem published

    Several monthly numbers of the Lake Forest Gem are published by two Lake Forest Academy students, the first printed local newspaper.
  • Train accident in Lake Forest

    George Hitzel is pushed onto a freight train while it is moving and is run over. He has to have his leg amputated. (Chicago Tribune 10- 24-1867)
  • Robbery at Anderson, Lind and Co.

    Robbery at Anderson, Lind and Co.
    Anderson, Lind and Co. dry goods store (pictured) is robbed. According to the Chicago Tribune "the store was completely ransacked and everything valuable was taken" (Chicago Tribune 10-21-1867).
  • O'Neill's Hardware opens

    O'Neill's Hardware opens
    Joseph O’Neill establishes O’Neill’s Hardware across from the train station on Western Av. (Arpee 1963 p. 81 and Kelsey, Paddock 2009 p. 22).
  • Noble Avenue School opens

    Noble Avenue School is established in north Lake Forest and Rev. James H. Taylor is superintendent of Schools.
  • Sylvester Lind becomes mayor

    Sylvester Lind becomes mayor
    Sylvester Lind becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Ferry Hall opens

    Ferry Hall opens
    Ferry Hall opens as a sister school to Lake Forest Academy on Mayflower Road. Money for the school comes from the Rev. William Montague Ferry, and the building is designed by O.L. Wheelock (Pioneer Press 7-28-1983, The Lake Forest Journal 3-1998). It opens with 66 students in grammar and college preparatory programs, 37 of whom are boarders. Room and board at Ferry Hall is $300 and tuition is $20 to $30 per term (Pridmore 1994 p. 34, 36).
  • John V. Farwell estate built

    John V. Farwell estate built
    The John V. Farwellestate at 888 East Deerpath is constructed, using Portland cement, by an unknown designer. The design of the house appears to have been influenced by English architect John Ruskin who called for a revival of the Gothic spirit in architecture (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 43).
  • In 1869...

    In 1869...
    The City Council agrees to rent a room in the James Anderson store (pictured) for $5 per month, including fire and lights, with said room designated “the Council Chamber of the City of Lake Forest.” Lake Forest receives a charter school district.
  • In 1870...

    The population of Lake Forest is about 800. The African Methodist Episcopal Church erects a frame church building at the present corner of Maplewood and Washington Road.
  • Fairlawn constructed

    Fairlawn constructed
    The Sen. Charles B. Farwell estate, Fairlawn, is constructed on a block bounded by Deerpath, Lake, and Mayflower Roads and Spring Lane. The house, modeled on the Tuscan villa form, is built in the Italianate style by an unknown architect. Farwell, who is a Congressman from a Chicago district, is chided in the Nov. 2 Chicago Tribune by his opponent, J. Wentworth, for living in Lake Forest, and not in his district.
  • Samuel Ezra Barnum becomes mayor

    Samuel Ezra Barnum becomes mayor
    Samuel Ezra Barnum becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Evergreens replaces first Lake Forest estate home

    Evergreens replaces first Lake Forest estate home
    The first Lake Forest estate house, a wood frame building built by Charles H. Quinlan in 1859, burns and is replaced by the brick Second Empire style building “Evergreens” now at 404 E. Deerpath. Built at the same time is a carriage house which later becomes the home of the Masonic Temple and the Historical Society.
  • "New" Hotel built

    "New" Hotel built
    The Lake Forest (or New) Hotel, the town’s second, is launched, built south of Mayflower Park on what is now the Schweppe estate.
  • John V. Farwell becomes mayor

    John V. Farwell becomes mayor
    John V. Farwell becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • First Ferry Hall commencement

    First Ferry Hall commencement
    The first Ferry Hall commencement is held in June 1871 (Pridmore 1994 p.36).
  • The Great Chicago Fire

    The Great Chicago Fire destroys three and one-half square miles in the center of the city, costing 300 lives and about $200 million in property damages.
  • The Lilacs built

    The Lilacs built
    The Lilacs is built for Simon S. Reid on the southwest corner of Sheridan and College Roads. It is built in the Italianate and Stick Style by architect Rufus Rose (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 57).
  • Chicago-Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad built

    The Chicago-Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad is built through the Lake Forest area.
  • Samuel Ezra Barnum becomes mayor

    Samuel Ezra Barnum becomes mayor of Lake Forest (2nd term).
  • Oakhurst built

    Oakhurst built
    Ezra J. Warner builds Oakhurst on N. Washington Rd., northeast of Triangle Park (Arpee 1963 p.96). It is designed by Burnham and Root in the Queen Ann style (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p.59).
  • Financial panic

    There is a financial panic due to over-borrowing for railroads among other things, and a five-year recession follows, fought against by Congressman C. B. Farwell in Washington, for three terms from 1871 to 1877.
  • Sarah Jane Rhea joins First Presbyterian Church

    Sarah Jane Rhea joins First Presbyterian Church. Rhea, a missionary who served in Persia (modern Iran), is involved with many missionary and philanthropic organizations and inspires wealthy Lake Forest residents to give generously to charity (Chakoian).
  • Heresy trial of Lake Forest University trustee David Swing

    Lake Forest related figures play crucial roles in the Presbyterian heresy trial of Lake Forest University trustee David Swing of the Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago. Swing, though acquitted, leaves the denomination and founds the Central Church, which is non-denominational. This, pretty much, marks the end of church centered culture among the New England elite in Chicago, and leads to new secular cultural institutions over the next two decades.
  • Grace Methodist Church founded

    Grace Methodist Church is founded by Reverend Solomon Thatcher.
  • In 1874...

    Sylvester Lind becomes mayor of Lake Forest (2nd term). The City Council instructs the superintendent to employ a principal of the public schools for the ensuing year at $70 per month and an assistant principal at $30 per month. Samuel Blackler buys Augustus Taylor’s meat market (the first one in Lake Forest) and continues running it as a butcher shop (Arpee 1964 p. 81).
  • Church of St. Mary built

    Church of St. Mary built
    The first Church of St. Mary, a frame building, is constructed. The first mass is held in September at the same location that St. Mary’s stands on today (Lake Forester 1-1-1988).
  • Merrie Meade built

    Merrie Meade, the Calvin Durand home, is constructed on Mayflower Road. It is built in the Second Empire-style (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 59).
  • Rev. Robert W. Patterson, first president of Lake Forest University

    Rev. Robert W. Patterson, first president of Lake Forest University
    Rev. Robert W. Patterson is the first president of Lake Forest University. He continues in this role until March 1878.
  • Reverend James J. McGovern assigned to St. Patrick’s Church

    The first resident pastor, Reverend James J. McGovern is assigned to St. Patrick’s Catholic Church.
  • Lake Forest Academy loses to Chicago White Sox

    The Lake Forest Academy’s baseball team loses to the Chicago White Sox 31-1.
  • Lake Forest University opens a coeducational Collegiate Department

    Lake Forest University once again opens its Collegiate Department (closed in 1863) this time as a coeducational program. This is due to the efforts of Mary Eveline Smith Farwell who wants to send her daughter, Anna, a recent graduate of Ferry Hall, to an institution for higher education. Under her married name, Mrs. Reginald DeKoven, Anna later becomes a notable author (Lake Forest in the Loop, Miller 2010).
  • Amzi Benedict becomes mayor

    Amzi Benedict becomes mayor
    Amzi Benedict becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Dormitory at Lake Forest University burns down

    Dormitory at Lake Forest University burns down
    On December 16, the first dormitory and classroom building at Lake Forest University – the former New Hotel – burns a year and a half after its founding. Classes resume in the Old Hotel, male students are housed at Lake Forest Academy and female students are housed with local families (Schulze, Cowler, Miller, 2000 p. 26).
  • President Rutherford B. Hayes visits Lake Forest.

    President Rutherford B. Hayes visits Lake Forest.
    In the only presidential visit of the first century of Lake Forest’s existence, President Rutherford B. Hayes visits the town. He stays with close associate William Henry Smith on Spring Lane just south of Fairlawn. Smith is Hayes’ Collector of Customs at Chicago, an important job when duties were the main source of income because there was no income tax. Normally in the newspaper business, Smith returned to the Associated Press in 1882.
  • In 1878...

    The Lake Forest Association is dissolved into the successor Lake Forest University. Rev. Daniel Seelye Gregory is president of Lake Forest University. Sylvester Lind becomes mayor of Lake Forest (3rd term)
  • South School opens

    South School opens in the former home of Rev. Baxter Dickinson at the corner of Sheridan and Maplewood Roads. The Dickinson home was moved there from its original location on College Road.
  • In 1879...

    Samuel Ezra Barnum becomes mayor of Lake Forest (3rd term).
  • Fire at Lake Forest Academy

    Fire at Lake Forest Academy
    Lake Forest Academy’s 1859 frame structure, which was expanded in 1865, burns to the ground. “Guv” Alexander Marshall, the African-American custodian, rings an alarm bell. Marshall lives near the northeast corner of Illinois and Washington Roads, and is a leader in founding the A.M.E. church nearby in 1866.
  • Blair Lodge built

    Blair Lodge built
    William LeBaron Jenney designsBlair Lodge, a lakefront estate, for W.C. Larned. The house represents a transitional period in local architecture between the Italianate and Queen Ann styles (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 60). According to Arpee “the house had one drawback - the family had to warn guests not to look at the beach below as frequently nude bathers appeared there” (Arpee 1964 p. 115).
  • In 1880...

    The first College commencement is held at Lake Forest University. The population of Lake Forest is 877. Under sponsorship of the C. B. Farwells, the monthly Lake Forest University Review is launched in January, with Anna Farwell (Class of 1880) as editor. The monthly continues through 1883.
  • North Hall built

    North Hall built
    North Hall, a gift from Charles B. Farwell, is built to house Lake Forest Academy.
  • In 1881...

    Sylvester Lind becomes mayor of Lake Forest (4th term). Rev. James McClure arrives in Lake Forest as Presbyterian minister.
  • In 1882...

    Lake Forest Cemetery Commission is organized, and W.L.B. Jenney is engaged to design and set-up the cemetery. The 1860 plan apparently never was laid out. An ordinance is passed to replat the Lake Forest cemetery because the plat from 1860, especially lots 1 and 3 are hard to maintain and manage (1898 City Charter and Revised Ordinances p. 175). Fire ravages much of Lake Forest’s downtown business district.
  • Moses L. Scudder Jr writes monograph

    Moses L. Scudder Jr writes monograph
    Moses L. Scudder Jr., a Chicago broker and economist, writes Congested Prices, a monograph in which he asserts that speculation-inflated prices for real estate, etc. financed by debt, had caused the 1873 panic. Scudder lives at 797 N. Sheridan Rd.
  • First prescription filled

    A.W. King, the first pharmacist in Lake Forest, fills his first prescription in the area (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • In 1884...

    Amzi Benedict becomes mayor of Lake Forest (2nd term).
  • First brick building in Lake Forest

    Joseph O’Neill builds the first brick building after the fire of 1882 and expands his hardware store (Arpee 1964 p. 81 and 113).
  • Joseph B. Durand becomes mayor

    Joseph B. Durand becomes mayor
    Joseph B. Durand becomes mayor of Lake Forest. A major issue in the election of 1886 is “do you support Mary Farwell’s improvement plan?” Mrs. Farwell wants all picket fences removed from around homes so that Lake Forest looks like a giant park. Joseph Durand supports her plan and is elected mayor (News/Voice 7-31-1986).
  • Rev. William C. Roberts is president of Lake Forest University.

    Rev. William C. Roberts is president of Lake Forest University.
  • Chicago Haymarket Square Riot

    Chicago Haymarket Square Riot takes place. Labor Union workers request 8 hour work days, and organize a strike on May 1 to gain attention. On May 4, a rally begins at Haymarket Square, on Randolph Street. Although a seemingly peaceful protest, a bomb explodes, and ignites a shoot-out between the protestors and policemen.
  • Lake Forest Art Institute organized

    The Lake Forest Art Institute, precursor to the Durand Art Institute, is organized.
  • New First Presbyterian Church building dedicated

    New First Presbyterian Church building dedicated
    The new First Presbyterian Church building, designed in the Shingle style by Cobb and Frost, is dedicated with Rev. Robert W. Patterson, founder of Second Presbyterian Church, Chicago, on hand. The spotted stones used in the construction are from the 1851 Second Presbyterian Church which was destroyed in the Chicago fire of 1871.
  • Fort Sheridan opens

    Fort Sheridan opens
    Fort Sheridan becomes a full-fledged military installation. The fort is built in Highwood partially as a response to the Chicago Haymarket Square Riot of May 4, 1886 which showed the need for a military presence near Chicago. The Farwell brothers of Lake Forest are involved in the creation of the fort (Ebner 1988 p.140-141).
  • One school opens, one closes

    One school opens, one closes
    Halsey School, originally called West School (pictured), is built. The property, located on Deerpath at Oakwood Avenue, is deeded to the City by D.R. and Ellen M. Holt. The brick building has four classrooms (The Lake Forester, 8-19-1975). Noble Avenue School discontinues operations.
  • Alcott School opens

    Alcott School opens
    Alcott School is founded as a private elementary school in a three-room cottage on what is now the Lake Forest College campus. It is named after Louisa May Alcott's father, Bronson Alcott. Alcott School is the building on the right.
  • Additions to Ferry Hall

    Two wings and a Gothic chapel are added to the main Ferry Hall building. It is designed by architects Cobb & Frost, and for Cobb is a precursor for his early University of Chicago buildings in the 1890s (Schulze, Cowler, Miller, p.34).
  • Moses Lewis Scudder becomes mayor

    Moses Lewis Scudder becomes mayor
    Moses Lewis Scudder becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Walter Cranston Larned becomes mayor

    Walter Cranston Larned becomes mayor
    Walter Cranston Larned becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • In 1889...

    A new water tower is constructed.
  • Wenban Funeral Home opens

    Wenban Funeral Home opens
    Curtis Gideon Wenban opens a funeral home at 233 E. Deerpath. The business also includes an ambulance and livery service. The ambulance service operates until 1963 when the equipment is donated to the Lake Forest Fire Department. Over time the livery service develops into Wenban Buick dealership (pictured) (News/Voice 7-31-1986).
  • In 1890...

    The population of Lake Forest is 1,203.
  • Calvin Durand Jr. becomes mayor

    Calvin Durand Jr. becomes mayor
    Calvin Durand Jr. becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • James Anderson Company founded

    The James Anderson Company, a civil engineering and surveying firm, is founded by James Anderson following his graduation from Lake Forest College. James Anderson is Lake County Surveyor from 1896 to1912. The company worked on many significant projects in Lake Forest (Legacy Collections Materials).
  • Grace Methodist Church built

    The first permanent Grace Methodist Church building is constructed on Scranton and Center Avenues (Lake Forest-Lake Bluff News 6-24-1976).
  • Gymnasium built

    Gymnasium built
    A gymnasium by H. I. Cobb is built on Lake Forest College campus and opens in April. Constructed at a cost of $30,000, this is one of the best equipped gymnasiums in the Midwest. It was the gift of Senator Charles B. Farwell. In 1969 the interior was damaged by fire; it was later remodeled into a classroom facility, Hotchkiss Hall.
  • First golf links

    First golf links
    Charles Blair MacDonald lays out the first golf links in Chicago on the grounds of Fairlawn using tomato cans for holes and a decorative pond as a water hazard.
  • The University of Chicago opens

    The University of Chicago opens, backed by John D. Rockefeller. The new University makes overtures to Lake Forest University but the trustees and alumni object to losing their Presbyterian affiliation and association (Lake Forest College in the Loop, Miller 2010).
  • O.C. Simonds drafts plans for grounds

    O.C. Simonds drafts a plan for the grounds of Lake Forest University.
  • Durand Art Institute built

    The Durand Art Institute building is constructed, designed by Henry Ives Cobb, and opens in February.
  • First Lake Forest Fire Brigade

    The first Lake Forest fire brigade is organized to protect the life, safety and property of local residents.
  • At Lake Forest University...

    John Merle Coulter is president of Lake Forest University.
  • Henry Ives Cobb house built

    Henry Ives Cobb builds for himself what is at the time the largest home in town, on Green Bay Road. The house is built in the Shingle style Frederick Law Olmsted designs the grounds.
  • New Campus for Lake Forest Academy opens

    The new campus for Lake Forest Academy opens and is modeled on eastern prep schools like Andover where Dr. James G. K. McClure (acting president of LF University 1892-93) was a student. The campus is built with generosity from his Presbyterian Church parishioners, the S. S. Reids, the Ezra Warners and others.
  • World’s Columbian Exposition held

    Chicago hosts the World’s Columbian Exposition. The fair opens to the public today.
  • Central School opens

    Central School opens
    The new Central School (later Gorton School) opens as the first consolidated K-12 public school in Lake Forest. Before Central School, children in Lake Forest attended several one-room schools.
  • New annexation

    New annexation
    An ordinance in passed annexing new territory to the City of Lake Forest. The annexation includes the area north of Wisconsin Road, west of Sheridan Road, east of Chicago and Northwestern Railroad and south of Lake Bluff border. It also includes present day Lake Forest High School and Sheridan School (1909 City Charter and Revised Ordinances p. 215).
  • Lake Forest University students play leading role in Chicago Temperance March

    Lake Forest University students play a leading role in the October 10th Chicago Temperance March “to protest the 7,000 saloons of Chicago and their influence on City Hall” (Arpee, 1964 p.138-39). The march begins across Kinzie Street and ends on State Street at the old Central Music Hall (today the location of Macy’s). The transportation of the students is paid for by prominent Lake Foresters including Henry C. Durand, Cyrus McCormick and Ezra Warner.
  • In 1895...

    The first police officer, James Gordon, is appointed. St. Patrick Church is struck by lightning and burns to the ground. The congregation attends St. Mary’s for services. Jasmine Lodge 409 of Lake Forest the American Order Sons of Saint George receive their charter on September 14, 1895 (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • Edward F. Gorton becomes mayor

    Edward F. Gorton becomes mayor
    Edward F. Gorton becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Argyllshire built

    Argyllshire built
    Argyllshire, the Cyrus McCormick III house, is constructed.
  • Lake Forest Golf Club formed

    Lake Forest Golf Club formed
    The Lake Forest Golf Club is formed and a nine-hole course is designed on the Leander McCormick farm.
  • Blackler Building built

    Blackler Building built
    The Blackler Building (pictured) is constructed on the southwest corner of Deerpath and Western, the first brick, three-story structure west of the tracks. It sets a limit for commercial district height lasting to the present, except for towers.
  • Telephone service arrives

    Telephone service arrives in Lake Forest. John Chapman, representing the Chicago Telephone Company, installs the first telephones (Arpee, 1964 p. 140). By the end of the year there are only 26 subscribers to the service due to the difficulty of installing telephone lines on the winding streets and over the deep ravines common in Lake Forest.
  • Pembroke Hall built

    Pembroke Hall built
    Henry Ives Cobb designs Pembroke Hall, the David B. Jones house on Green Bay Road. It is built from Wisconsin limestone and represents a transition for Cob between classical and romantic designs (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 69).
  • In 1896...

    In 1896...
    The Highland Park Electric Light Company brings electricity to Lake Forest. An ordinance is passed June 6 renaming several streets or parts of streets Sheridan Road (1909 City Charter and Revised Ordinance p. 285). North School for the primary grades is established on North Sheridan Road. J.E. Fitzgerald Plumbing (pictured) opens at 253 East Deerpath (Lake Forest Review 8-24-1917). The J.E Fitzgerald building was originally called the Quinlan Building.
  • Walden built

    Walden built
    Walden, the Cyrus McCormick Jr. home designed by Jarvis Hunt, is constructed. The landscape of the estate—in time a nationally-known arboretum—begins in 1894 under John C. Olmsted of the Olmsted Brothers firm, Brookline, MA, with associate Warren Manning, who by this year goes out on his own. Manning returns to the McCormick's every spring for forty years.
  • Ardleigh built

    Ardleigh built
    Ardleigh, the John V. Farwell Jr. house, is constructed in the English traditional style. It is designed by Arthur Heun (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003).
  • Changes at Lake Forest University

    Lake Forest University Board of Trustees vote to re-engineer the school by dropping the Chicago-based professional programs and retreating from graduate school efforts. The school will, instead, focus on developing the quality of Lake Forest College, a four-year liberal arts program (Lake Forest College in the Loop, Miller 2010).
  • Onwentsia Club opens

    Onwentsia Club opens
    The Onwentsia Club opens on the grounds of the Henry Ives Cobb home, successor of the Lake Forest Golf Club. The Cobb home is turned into a clubhouse. Members of the Onwentsia Club include established Lake Forest families such as the Farwells, Holts and Durands and well known Chicago families such as a the Armours and McCormicks (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 68).
  • Publication of the Lake Forester begins

    Publication of the Lake Forester begins in July with the first issue coming out on the 16th. S.S. Speer is the founder and Ellen Holt is credited with coming up with the paper’s name. Early issues of the Lake Forester include local social news and weekly fictional serials with titles like “The Hidden Terror" and “The Patriot’s Talisman” (Lake Forester 8-5-1996).
  • Ragdale built

    Construction begins on Howard Van Doren Shaw designs for his own family on Green Bay Road. The house is inspired by the Arts and Crafts style as well as Beaux-Arts ideas (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 70).
  • North Shore Electric Line built through Lake Forest

    The North Shore Electric Line is built through Lake Forest after public safety and aesthetic standards are met. These include installing a drainage system, imposing a speed limit of 2 mph in populated areas, and arranging for a crossing guard at a busy intersection (Ebner, 1988 p. 120). An ordinance is passed allowing the Bluff City Electric Street Railway Company to lay down, construct, maintain and operate a street railway upon certain streets in Lake Forest (1909 City Charter).
  • In 1897...

    In 1897...
    The inaugural Lake Forest Horse Show is held (pictured). The West School building is expanded to include an office, girls’ bathroom, and kindergarten room. Rev. James G. K. McClure is president of Lake Forest University.
  • City Hall built

    City Hall built
    Lake Forest City Hall is constructed at Deerpath and Forest Avenue, designed by architects Frost and Granger, and financed by a $10,000 Franchise Fee from the North Shore Electric Railroad Company. The City establishes a public library and appoints the first library board. The library is housed in the new City Hall and opens its doors the next year. The Fire Department is also established at City Hall.
  • Alice Home Hospital built

    Alice Home Hospital built
    Alice Home Hospital, the predecessor to Lake Forest Hospital, is erected on the Lake Forest College campus.
  • Westleigh built

    Westleigh built
    Westleigh is built on Green Bay Road for Louis F. Swift. Built in the colonial-revival style, it is designed by William Carbys Zimmerman. In 1916 a new wing designed by Howard Van Doren Shaw is added (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 93).
  • Lois Durand Hall built at Lake Forest College

    Lois Durand Hall built at Lake Forest College
    Lois Durand Hall is built on Lake Forest College campus as a women’s dormitory.
  • Chicago and Northwestern depot moved

    A Lake Forest resident moves the original Chicago and Northwestern depot from Sun Street to Forest Avenue across from the Young Men’s Club using a team of horses (News/Voice 7-30-1986).
  • In 1898...

    An ordinance is passed Jan. 3 allowing the Highland Park Electric Company to construct maintain and operate electric light wires along Western Av. between the south corporate limits of Lake Forest to Deer Path (1898 City Charter and Revised Ordinances p. 194). A license is granted Feb 14 to the Highland Park Electric Company to extend electric wires across Illinois Av. to transmit electricity to private property (1898 City Charter).
  • Church of the Holy Spirit orginized

    The first Episcopal worship service in Lake Forest is conducted on Palm Sunday. 52 people, who later form the Church of the Holy Spirit’s congregation, attend.
  • In 1899...

    In 1899...
    The cornerstone for the Arthur Somerville Reid Memorial Library (pictured) and Lily Reid Holt Memorial Chapel is laid in November on Lake Forest College campus as a gift from Mrs. Simon Reid. An ordinance is passed Dec 4 allowing Highland Park Electric Light Company to locate, construct and maintain electric light polls and wires along roads in Lake Forest (1909 City Charter and Revised Ordinances p. 250).
  • The Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad starts

    The Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad Company, later named the North Shore Line, makes its first run in August.
  • In 1900...

    The population of Lake Forest is 2,215. Arthur Aldis purchases the estate at the southeast corner of Deerpath and Green Bay Road. The Onwentsia Hunt Club is started. A $15,000 bond issue is approved by the voters to acquire the Gorton School site and construct a school house.
  • Rookwoods built

    Rockwoods is constructed in the English Arts and Crafts style on Waukegan Road for Miss Helen Culver.
  • First automobile in Lake Forest

    First automobile in Lake Forest
    The first automobile, a black Winton, is introduced to Lake Forest by Arthur Farwell, son of J. V. Farwell. The automobile may have looked similar to the Winton pictured which is from 1899.
  • First Baptist Church of Lake Forest is organized

    The First Baptist Church of Lake Forest is organized. First Baptist is established by a group of African-American servants who aren’t allowed to join the mainly white churches in the Lake Forest area. The main organizers are Reverend Harry Knight and B.P.E. Gales. For the first three years, the congregation worships in each other’s homes (Chicago Tribune 1-17-1997, Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • Train station built

    Train station built
    The present Chicago and North Western Railroad station is constructed, designed by Frost and Granger, and opened in November. It is the fourth such structure since the 1850s.
  • In 1901...

    Mayor Gorton orders motorists to carry a light after dark to avoid collisions with pedestrians and other vehicles. O.C. Simonds proposes a revised cemetery plan. Rev. Richard Harlan is president of Lake Forest College. The first class at Central School graduates.
  • Grace Methodist Church moves

    Grace Methodist Church moves to Glen and Center Avenues and builds a larger building (Lake Forest-Lake Bluff News 6-24-1976).
  • In 1902...

    In 1902...
    The North Gas Company brings gas lamps into the community despite considerable opposition from a number of residents who fear the lamps will kill the trees and shrubbery and result in the community taking on an “urban” appearance. Walker Sales (pictured) is hired as the second Police Officer for the City of Lake Forest.
  • Mark Morton becomes mayor

    Mark Morton becomes mayor
    Mark Morton becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Winter Club established

    Winter Club established
    The Winter Club is established and its Charles Frost-designed clubhouse is constructed.
  • Church of the Holy Spirit built

    Church of the Holy Spirit built
    The Church of the Holy Spirit building is constructed in the English Gothic style, designed by Alfred Granger. Previously the congregation met in Blackler Hall over Blackler Market beginning in 1889 and the Brewster House, later known as Deerpath Inn (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • J.V. Farwell barn burns to the ground

    J.V. Farwell’s barn burns to the ground. The fire department has trouble assisting because the “plug” (fire hydrant) was 1,000 feet away (City of Lake forest website Public Safety).
  • C.T. Gunn opens a new grocery store

    C.T. Gunn opens a new grocery store in the O’Neill building after splitting from his business partner S.C. Orr. Orr continues to operate the original store (Lake Forester 4-5-1902).
  • Smith building added to Ferry Hall

    The Smith building is added to Ferry Hall school as a classroom building (Lake Forester, 7-27-1945).
  • Scarlet fever epidemic

    A severe epidemic of scarlet fever breaks out during the winter months and the entire city is placed under quarantine. Lake Forest Academy is temporarily closed and students are sent back to their homes in an attempt to prevent scarlet fever (The Waukegan Daily Sun 3-8-1902).
  • International Harvester farm implement trust is put together

    The International Harvester farm implement trust is put together fm the McCormick, Deering, Glessner, Plano Manufacturing and other such equipment firms, with Cyrus H. McCormick II (Walden estate) as president, representing with his brother Harold the Rockefeller interest in the trust, while the Deerings represented J. P. Morgan, trying also to gain the upper hand. McCormick also is board chair at Lake Forest University/College from 1901 to 1903, leaving that post as the IH deal heated up.
  • The Lake Forest Woman’s Club organized

    The Lake Forest Woman’s Club is organized on November 12, 1902. Dr. Elva Wright is elected the club’s first president (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • In 1903...

    An ordinance is passed concerning certain self-propelled vehicles along streets, highways, and public places in the City of Lake Forest: no automobile, autocar, steamroller, etc., shall be operated at a greater rate of speed than 8 mph. A photographer opens a gallery in the Masterson House on Westminster. 25 pictures cost 25 cents (Lake Forester 6-6-1903). Alcott School moves to Sheridan Road and Deerpath.
  • Fredrik Herman Gade becomes mayor

    Fredrik Herman Gade becomes mayor
    Fredrik Herman Gade becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • John Griffith opens his real estate office

    John Griffith opens his real estate office
    John Griffith opens his real estate office, originally located on the south side of Deerpath just west of the Blackler Building. The business, now known as Griffith, Grant and Lackie, is still operated by relatives of John Griffith (Lake Forester 2-23-1999).
  • Westmoreland built

    Westmoreland built
    The Albert Blake Dick house, Westmoreland, is constructed. The architect is James Gamble Rogers. A.B. Dick is the founder of the A.B. Dick & Co. which started out as a lumber company but became a manufacturer of mimeograph machines after Dick licensed the product from Thomas Edison.
  • Lake Forest University becomes Lake Forest College

    Lake Forest University becomes Lake Forest College
    Lake Forest University is now known as Lake Forest College although the charter for Lake Forest University remains unchanged until 1965 for tax reasons (Miller, Lake Forest in the Loop timeline, 2010).
  • The First Baptist Church is built

    The First Baptist congregation raises enough money to build a church on Oakwood Avenue (Chicago Tribune 1-17-1997).
  • In 1904...

    North School closes. The Union Pacific New Line for freight opens. Allen C. Bell, a substitute teacher at Alcott School, purchases the school (“Country Day Story Begins In Eighties” article from February 16, 1961). John E. Baggett is Superintendent of Public Schools.
  • Griffith Block built

    The Griffith Block building is constructed at 768 North Western Avenue.
  • Mellody Farms built

    Mellody Farms built
    Construction begins on J. Ogden Armour’s estate, Mellody Farms.
  • Great Lakes Naval Training Center authorized

    Great Lakes Naval Training Center authorized
  • The Academy of the Sacred Heart moves to Lake Forest

    The Academy of the Sacred Heart moves to Lake Forest
    The Academy of the Sacred Heart (Woodlands Academy) is moved from Chicago to West Taylor Street, Lake Forest. The Academy of the Sacred Heart is part of an international group of academic institutions directed by the Society of the Sacred Heart, a teaching order founded in France in 1800 by St. Madeline Sophie Barat.
  • Anderson Building constructed

    Anderson Building constructed
    The Anderson building is constructed on the northwest corner of Western and Deerpath. It houses the expanded Anderson Store, one of the oldest businesses in Lake Forest, and becomes the largest business house in town (Arpee 1964 p.165).
  • In 1905...

    In 1905...
    Central School is renamed Gorton in honor of former mayor Edward F. Gorton. The total number of grade school students in Lake Forest reaches 405 (Arpee 1964). The Horticultural Society of Lake Forest is founded on July 19, 1905 (pictured) (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • King home built

    King home built
    The Charles Garfield King home, designed by Howard Van Doren Shaw, is constructed on Ridge Road. It is also the home of Ginevra King, the inspiration for Daisy Buchanan in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby (1925) (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 111).
  • Krafft’s Drugstore opens

    Krafft’s Drugstore opens
    Krafft’s Drugstore opens after Karl Krafft buys the business from E.A. Nordling who had owned the store since 1899. The store is at 666 N. Western Av. (Lake Forester 7-26-1956).
  • In 1906...

    The Young Men’s Club is organized. Charles Dyer Norton, a Lake Forest College trustee and college neighbor, leads the College in undertaking a new campus plan on City Beautiful, formal principles (Lake Forest College in the Loop Miller 2010).
  • David H. Jackson becomes mayor

    David H. Jackson becomes mayor
    David H. Jackson becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Edward L. Baker home built

    Howard Van Doren Shaw designs the Edward L. Baker home on Sheridan Road in the English Arts and Crafts style.
  • First Deerpath Inn opens

    First Deerpath Inn opens
    The first Deerpath Inn is opened by the Patterson family on Deerpath.
  • Durand Commons built

    Durand Commons built
    Durand Commons is designed on Lake Forest College campus by Howard Van Doren Shaw.
  • Arcady Farm built

    Arcady Farm built
    Arcady Farm is built at the northwest corner of Waukegan Road and Route 60 for the Arthur Meeker family. The Italianate stucco house is designed by Arthur Heun (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 108). Meeker's son, Arthur Jr, became a notable novelist and newspaper columnist.
  • Covin Tree is built

    The Walter and Kate Brewster estate, Covin Tree, is designed by Howard Van Doren Shaw. The house is located at the corner of Green Bay and Westminster Roads (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 157).
  • In 1907...

    First National Bank of Lake Forest opens. John Scholte Nollen is president of Lake Forest College. Howard Van Doren Shaw designs an assembly hall for Gorton School. The Knights of Columbus Lake Forest Council No. 1268 is chartered on November 3, 1907 with 65 members (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • In 1908...

    An ordinance is passed allowing the North Shore Electric Company to construct, maintain and operate electric light wires and polls on certain parts of Western Av., McKinley Rd., and Sheridan Rd. (1909 City Charter and Revised Ordinances p. 273). Frank Jensen opens a shoe repair shop. This business later becomes Jensen Boot Shop and will be located on Market Square under the clock tower (Lake Forester 7-10-1996).
  • Glen Rowan built

    Glen Rowan built
    Clifford Barnes commissions Howard Van Doren Shaw to build Glen Rowan. The house is built in the English Renaissance style from pressed brick (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 132).
  • Villa Turicum built

    Villa Turicum built
    Charles A. Platt begins designs for Villa Turicum to be built for Harold Fowler McCormick and Edith Rockefeller McCormick. The house is completed in 1909 but Platt continues to work on the estate until 1918. The 44-room house on 300 acres is estimated to cost $5 million.
  • Liquor delivery prohibited

    At the request of the Women’s Temperance Union of the North Shore, the City Council passes an ordinance prohibiting the delivery of intoxicating liquor within the City and prohibiting children from being employed in the business of delivering intoxicating liquors.
  • First Lake Forest Day

    First Lake Forest Day
    The Lake Forest Woman’s Club inaugurates Lake Forest Day with support from the Young Men’s Club. Proceeds go to the construction of a contagious hospital to supplement Alice Home Hospital.
  • In 1909...

    Frederik Herman Gade becomes mayor of Lake Forest (2nd term). An ordinance is passed Jan 4 vacating the part of Illinois Road that lies west of Green Bay Road (1909 City Charter and Revised Ordinance p. 313).
  • Thorne house built

    James Ward Thorne and his wife Narcissa Niblack Thorne build a French Renaissance chateau designed by Edwin Hill Clark. Mrs. Thorns’ historically accurate miniature rooms are on display at the Art Institute of Chicago (Coventry, Meyer, Miller p. 156).
  • In 1910...

    The population of Lake Forest is about 3,300. Lake Forest Improvement League Chairman Walter S. Brewster presents a comprehensive improvement and beautification plan for the streets and general cleanliness in Lake Forest to the City Council. The intent is to cement Lake Forest’s status as “the best, safest, healthiest and the most beautiful suburb of Chicago.” The plan calls for the extensive planting of trees and the seeding of parkways downtown. The Lake Forest YWCA is organized.
  • C. Frederick Childs becomes mayor

    C. Frederick Childs becomes mayor
    C. Frederick Childs becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • First professional fire department

    The City establishes the first professional fire department.
  • St. Patrick's Church rebuilt

    St. Patrick's Church rebuilt
    St. Patrick's Church is rebuilt at the northeast corner of Everett and Waukegan Roads after it burned to the ground for a second time in 1908.
  • Jane Addams of Hull House visits Lake Forest

    Jane Addams of Hull House and aunt of John Addams Linn, Lake Forest College class of 1893, is in Lake Forest for a day in December, dining in Durand Hall and speaking to the women about the garment workers strike (Lake Forest in the Loop, Miller 2010).
  • Second Church of St. Mary’s built

    The second Church of St. Mary’s building is constructed at the corner of Green Bay and Illinois Roads in 1909. It is designed by Henry Lord Gay (GazeboNews 2-2-2010). The new church building is dedicated by Archbishop Quigley today.
  • In 1911...

    In 1911...
    The Police Department purchases a motorcycle for their use (pictured). The Lake Forest Good Roads Association, originally formed for the purpose of sprinkling the streets of Lake Forest, dissolves, donating its sprinkler cart to the City of Lake Forest. The Lake Forest Young Women’s Christian Association (Y.W.C.A.) is organized at Red Bird Cottage owned by Mrs. Aldis (Lake Forester 6-27-1945).
  • John T. Pirie Sr. becomes mayor

    John T. Pirie Sr. becomes mayor
    John T. Pirie Sr. becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Great Lakes Naval Training Station dedicated

    Great Lakes Naval Training Station dedicated
  • In 1912...

    The City Council passes an ordinance prohibiting the exhibition of obscene and immoral pictures and regulating the exhibition of pictures of the classes and kinds “commonly shown in mutoscopes, kinescopes, cinematographs, and penny arcades.” Ravinia Park opens with opera performances in Highland Park.
  • West School renamed John J. Halsey School

    West School renamed John J. Halsey School
    West School is renamed John J. Halsey School after Dr. Halsey, who served for 50 years in Lake Forest as an alderman, president of the board of education, member of the first library board, president pro tem of Lake Forest College, elder of the First Presbyterian Church, and author of “The History of Lake County” (The Lake Forester 8-19-1975).
  • Lake Forest Garden Club formed

    The Lake Forest Garden Club is formed and the first meeting is held at the home of Mrs. Hugh J. McBirney. Mrs. Tiffany Blake is credited with being the club’s organizer (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • In 1913...

    Max Cohn opens his grocery store at 1005 McKinley Road. The Old Elm Club in Highland Park is organized by Onwentsia Club members looking for a less crowded place to golf.
  • First motorized fire engine purchased

    First motorized fire engine purchased
    The city’s first motorized fire engine is purchased. The vehicle carries 1,250 feet of hose 100 feet of ladders and an 80 gallon chemical tank. Alfred Marwede Sr. is the truck’s engineer (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety).
  • Illinois women win right to vote

    Women in Illinois win the right to vote, before the 19th Amendment is passed in 1920.
  • In 1914...

    In 1914...
    The City hires its first full-time professional fire fighter to operate the new motor fire truck. Much of the interior of Halsey School is destroyed by a fire. Plans to reconstruct are created immediately, reconstruction begins in July, and the by September the school is repaired enough to allow classes to resume (picture from Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • Ridge Farm Preventorium built

    The wooden structure of Ridge Farm (later Grove School), is built by Mrs. Francis R. Dickinson as a “preventorium” for children in the Chicago area with a high likelihood of developing tuberculosis (Ridge Farm Preventorium by Historic Certification Consultants, The Lake Forester 7-30-1953, Chicago Tribune 10-18-1999)
  • Everett School built

    Everett School built
    Everett School, a two-room brick building, is constructed.
  • Havenwood built

    Havenwood built
    Havenwood, the E.L. Ryerson estate designed by Howard Van Doren Shaw, is constructed. The Italianate villa has gardens designed by Rose Nichols and landscape architect Jens Jenson, designs the drives and meadow (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 175).
  • Leverett Thompson becomes mayor

    Leverett Thompson becomes mayor
    Leverett Thompson becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • In 1915...

    In 1915...
    The building plans for the improvement of the Market Square business district by the Lake Forest Improvement Association are submitted and approved by City Council. Lake Foresters vote 495-452 against screening movies on Sundays. Rev. George Roberts becomes pastor of First Presbyterian Church.
  • William Mather Lewis becomes mayor

    William Mather Lewis becomes mayor
    William Mather Lewis becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Elawa Farms built

    Elawa Farms built
    Construction begins on A. Watson Armour’s Elawa Farms property.
  • Mayflower Place built

    Mayflower Place built
    John G. Shedd commissions Mayflower Place for his daughter Laura and her husband Charles Schweppe.
  • First tenant in Market Square

    First tenant in Market Square
    The First National Bank of Lake Forest is the first tenant to sign up for space on Market Square. This leads to street in front of the bank being named Bank Lane.
  • Eastland sinks on Chicago River

    The steamship Eastland, capsizes in the Chicago River between LaSalle and Clark streets, trapping 844 people below deck underwater.
  • In 1916...

    In 1916...
    The City Council approves an ordinance to prevent ducks and chickens from running at large in the City of Lake Forest. Kerosene street lamps are installed throughout Lake Forest. F. Scott Fitzgerald visits Ginevra King in Lake Forest. King is the inspiration for Daisy Buchanan in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby (1925). Edward Monahan buys his father’s Chocolate Shop at 600 Western Ave (pictured lower left corner).
  • Young Men’s Club House plans submitted for review

    Young Men’s Club House plans submitted for review
    Plans for the construction of the Young Men’s Club House (the “Old Rec Center”) including the upper floor of the bank building are submitted for Council review.
  • Pike home built

    Pike home built
    The Charles P. Pike home is constructed. The Italianate villa is designed by David Adler and Henry Dangler (Coventry, Meyer, Miller 2003 p. 208).
  • Krafft’s Drug Store opens at its new location

    Krafft’s Drug Store opens at its new location
    Krafft’s Drug Store opens at its new location, 664 N. Western Ave. after moving from its original location (Lake Forester 7-26-1959).
  • In 1917...

    In 1917...
    The Lake Forest War Emergency Union is organized. The Market Square flagpole is installed as a tribute to WWI soldiers (pictured). The Rev. Francis J. Barry establishes the School of St. Mary. The school contains five classrooms, two music rooms, a playroom, an assembly room and 125 students. Neil N. Campbell is hired as Lake Forest City Engineer. In 1948 he becomes City manager and serves in that position until his retirement in 1955 (Lake Forester 9-1-1956).
  • Market Square completed

    Market Square completed
    Market Square is completed at a cost of $750,000. Designed by Howard Van Doren Shaw, the square is called “the first integrated and artfully designed shopping center in the country.”
  • Keene H. Addington becomes mayor

    Keene H. Addington becomes mayor
    Keene H. Addington becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Barat College chartered

    Barat College chartered
    Barat College is chartered by the state of Illinois as a four-year college. Barat College is the collegiate branch of the Academy of the Sacred Heart. Before this time the school had been a high school and junior college.
  • Hospital Association of Lake Forest formed

    The Alice Home Hospital is incorporated as the Hospital Association of Lake Forest and is operated separately from Lake Forest College.
  • News of the armistice ending WWI reaches Lake Forest

    News of the armistice ending WWI prompts the bell ringer at City Hall to such enthusiasm that the bell cracks and is never used again. An electric siren is later bought to replace the bell (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety).
  • Henry A. Rumsey becomes mayor

    Henry A. Rumsey becomes mayor
    Henry A. Rumsey becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • In 1919...

    During the milk strike of 1919, milk is brought in from Highland Park. In May, the City buys an electric siren and begins daily testing of the siren at noon. The Lake Forest Girl Scout Troop is organized by Lillian Low with 16 members (Lake Forester 7-27-1945). Col. William F. Thorpe founds Thorpe Academy on seven acres at Sheridan Road and Spruce Avenue. The military style school costs $1,375 a year, a steep price even for the wealthy parents the school aims to attract.
  • American Legion post charterd

    American Legion post charterd
    The American Legion charters George Alexander McKinlock Jr. (pictured) Post 264 . The post is named for George A. McKinlock Jr., a soldier from Lake Forest who was killed in WWI and may have been the first casualty from Lake Forest in the First World War (News and Voice 7-30-1986).
  • In 1920...

    The population of Lake Forest is about 3,600. The City Council approves the acquisition of the water system from the Lake Forest Water Company for a special assessment of $250,000. Stanley Kiddle opens Kiddle’s on Market Square. The store provides bike sales, rental, and repairs.
  • Fairlawn burns down

    Fairlawn burns down
    Fairlawn, the former Charles B. Farwell residence inhabited by Robert McGann and Grace Farwell McGann, burns down.
  • In 1921...

    The American Legion takes over sponsorship of Lake Forest Day and forms a drum and bugle corps (News and Voice 7-30-1986).. Rev. Herbert McComb Moore is president of Lake Forest College. The Lake Forest Fire Department acquires a motor driven pump. Firefighters had been dependent on water main pressure before this time (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety).
  • In 1922...

    The City of Lake Forest establishes the Zoning Commission. Axel Helander, a native of Finland and a chauffeur at the Schweppe estate in Lake Forest, opens a radio shop on Western Av. Over the years this business evolves into Helander’s Stationers (Lake Forester 8-19-1949). The Royal Blue Grocery Store opens on Western Ave. (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • Bix Beiderbecke attends Lake Forest Academy

    Future famous jazz musician Bix Beiderbecke attends Lake Forest Academy.
  • Two new clothing stores open

    Two new clothing stores open
    Margret Baxter Foster opens The Lake Forest Sport Shop on Market Square. The store sells women’s sportswear such as long tennis dresses and bathing dresses as well as trousers and blouses which are growing in popularity (Pioneer Press 9-13-2007). George G. Robertson opens Robertson’s Men’s Wear at 279 E. Deerpath. The store moved to 276 E. Deerpath in 1932 (1932 location pictured).
  • In 1923...

    The City Council adopts the first zoning ordinance. The Kiwanis Club of Lake Bluff and Lake Forest is established with 51 charter members (Lake Forester 7-27-1945). The Parker Company dry-cleaning business opens (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • Fairlawn rebuilt

    Fairlawn rebuilt
    Fairlawn is rebuilt for Grace Farwell Winston McGann and Robert McGann by architects Delano and Aldrich.
  • In 1924...

    The home of millionaire broker Volney Foster is gutted by fire (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety). Gilbert Rayner founds Gilbert Rayner Associates real estate firm with his wife Helen (Lake Forester 7-29-1976).
  • Prince of Wales visits Lake Forest

    Prince of Wales visits Lake Forest
    The Prince of Wales, later (Edward VIII) visits Lake Forest.
  • Knollwood Club incorporated

    Knollwood Club incorporated
    The Knollwood Club is incorporated. The club’s property consists mainly of the Granger Farwell farm and the clubhouse is, in part, the original farm house. The 18-hole golf course is designed by Captain Allison on 265 acres of land (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • In 1925...

    Green Bay Road is declared a “pleasure driveway” by City ordinance, barring burden-carrying vehicles. Lake Forest Academy and Ferry Hall separate from Lake Forest College. The pure Ice and Fuel Company is started by Sam Volpe. Originally the company sold only ice and bottled water but in 1933 fuel is added (Lake Forester 7-26-1956).
  • Farwell Winston becomes mayor

    Farwell Winston becomes mayor
    Farwell Winston becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Fire station built

    Fire station built
    The main fire station is built at Forest Avenue and Southgate across from City Hall. The new station includes a bunk room to sleep in, an office for the fire chief and enough room for three pieces of apparatus (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety).
  • In 1926...

    The City Council adopts an ordinance establishing the Lake Forest Plan Commission. The Skokie Valley Route of the North Shore Interurban opens. The Foundation for Architecture and Landscape Architecture is organized by the Lake Forest Garden Club and housed at Lake Forest College. The Hospital Resale Shop is founded. Local residents can donate gently used quality items to be sold to local workers for a good price (Pioneer Press 10-28-2010).
  • The Crown Prince of Sweden visits Lake Forest

    The Crown Prince of Sweden visits Lake Forest
    The Crown Prince Gustavus Adolphus and Princess Louise of Sweden visit Lake Forest.
  • Deerpath Theater built

    Deerpath Theater built
    Construction on the Deerpath Theater begins; cost is $175,000.
  • Mill Road Farm built

    Mill Road Farm built
    David Adler designs Albert Lasker’s Mill Road Farm estate in Everett (west Lake Forest).
  • Everett annexed by the City of Lake Forest

    The residents of Lake Forest approve the annexation of an area west of Skokie Highway consisting of 9 square miles. The community of Everett is annexed by the City of Lake Forest, and the Everett school becomes part of the Lake Forest school district (The Lake Forester and Lake Forest News 7-2-1945).
  • Church of the Holy Spirit addition

    Church of the Holy Spirit addition
    A new gothic entrance and parish building are added to The Church of the Holy Spirit (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • Fort Sheridan becomes a Civilian Military Training camp

    Following the National Defense Act of 1920, Fort Sheridan becomes a Civilian Military Training camp, where college-age men undergo four weeks of concentrated training.
  • In 1927...

    In 1927...
    The League of Women Voters of Lake Forest is formed. The City Council passes an ordinance redistricting the city into four wards instead of three. Anderson’s Trust building is constructed. Albert Lasker’s Mill Road Farm golf course is completed (pictured).
  • New clubhouse planned at the Onwentsia Club

    New clubhouse planned at the Onwentsia Club
    Plans for a new clubhouse at the Onwentsia Club are announced. The structure is estimated to cost $500,000.
  • Deerpath Golf Course opens

    The first nine holes of the Deerpath Municipal Golf Course are opened, with resident membership at $18 per year.
  • In 1928...

    Samuel Insull buys Mellody Farms, the former Armour estate, and plans to turn it into a country club. The Lake Forest Day School i founded on Deerpath by parents who want the arts and sports included in the curriculum. The Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) is organized at a meeting called by the Lake Forest Women’s Club on October 9, 1928 (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • Albert Blake Dick Jr. becomes mayor

    Albert Blake Dick Jr. becomes mayor
    Albert Blake Dick Jr. becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Noble Brandon Judah home built

    Noble Brandon Judah home built
    The Noble Brandon Judah estate is completed on Westminster, designed by Philip Goodwin.
  • The Deerpath Theater opens

    The Deerpath Theater opens
    The Deerpath Theater opens at 272 Deerpath Road. The theater has seating for 950 people and is designed in the neo-Tudor style by Stanly Anderson (Lake Forester no date). The first film shown at the theater is “Glorious Betsy.”
  • Libertyville family robbed in Lake Forest

    The Lloyd C. Ray family of Libertyville is held up by four armed robbers at the corner of Green Bay and Westleigh Roads in Lake Forest. They are stopped by a fallen tree limb across the road at 11pm and forced out of their car by the robbers who then proceed to take their money and car (Libertyville Ind. 11-29-1928).
  • The Deerpath railroad car initiated

    A private railroad car, called the Deerpath or the “Millionaires Special," is initiated on the Chicago and North Western Railroad. Around thirty businessmen from Lake Forest, who commute into Chicago for work, pay $15,000 a year for the use of the car (Van Sickle, 1986).
  • North and South Halls built at Ferry Hall

    The North and South Halls at Ferry Hall are built.
  • In 1929...

    The City Council passes a resolution favoring the de-annexation of Lake Forest from the Deerfield-Shields Township High School District and establishing a high school within its own boundaries. The first full-time fire chief, James Hough, is appointed. He is a retired captain from Chicago (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety). The Lake Forester newspaper switches to magazine format on March 29th (Lake Forester 8-5-1996).
  • Dickinson and Stirling Hall built at Ridge Farm

    Dickinson and Stirling Hall are designed and built by Edwin H. Clark at Ridge Farm (Ridge Farm Preventorium by Historic Certification Consultants).
  • The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre occurs

    The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre occurs
    The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre occurs in Chicago. A group of men led by Al Capone (although his involvement is never proven) murder members of a rival gang. Images of the scene symbolize Chicago’s gang violence and leave the public in shock
  • The new Deer Path Inn opens

    The new Deer Path Inn opens
    On July 19 the new Deer Path Inn opens on Illinois Road. The Inn, designed by William C. Jones, is in the Tudor Revival Style and is modeled after a 15th Century English country manor (National Register of Historic Places).
  • The stock market crashes

    The stock market crashes signaling the start of the Great Depression. On October 29, workmen leave the half finished building project that is to turn J. Ogden Armour’s Mellody Farm estate into a country club. The project is never completed. This is the first sign of the Great Depression in Lake Forest (Van Sickle, 1986).
  • In 1930...

    The population of Lake Forest is 6,554. Lake Forest Day is cancelled due to the economic hardships brought on by the Great Depression (Van Sickle, 1986). Lake Forest Day School begins construction on a new facility on Green Bay Road.
  • The Lake Forest Community Council is founded

    The Lake Forest Community Council (LFCC) is created by Rev. Herbert William Prince, as a clearinghouse for relief work during the Great Depression. The council created 42 jobs for unemployed workers (Van Sickle, 1986).
  • Karl Knauz opens a service station

    Karl Knauz opens a service station
    Karl Knauz, a chauffeur, opens a service station at Woodland and Western avenues. He begins to sell cars after he joins forces with competitor Wallace Boutin and moves to a new location on Western Ave. north of Westminster in 1934 (Pioneer Press 5-13-2004).
  • In 1931...

    Marshall Field’s department store moves into the anchor position in Market Square after the space is vacated by the First National Bank of Lake Forest and the North Shore Gas Company (Lake Forester 9-3-1930). Previously, the store was located at the corner of Bank Lane and Deerpath Road and sold only infant and children’s apparel. Helander’s opens as a printing business. Skokie Highway (Rte. 41) is completed through Lake Forest.
  • Albert D. Farwell becomes mayor

    Albert D. Farwell becomes mayor
    Albert D. Farwell becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Lake Forest Library built

    Lake Forest Library built
    The Lake Forest Library is constructed on Deerpath, and is designed by architect Edwin H. Clark. The $250,000 needed to build the library is donated by Mrs. Stanley Keith and Mrs. Charles S. Schweppe, daughters of John G. Shedd. The library moves to its new home today (Arpee 1964 p.219-220).
  • Armed robbery at Mitchell home

    There is an armed robbery at the home of William Mitchell on Rosemary Road. Three gunmen round up the Mitchell family, their guests and servants and force them, at gunpoint, to surrender their valuables. Bill Matheson, the chauffeur, escapes the notice of the gunmen long enough to phone the police who arrive and scare off the robbers. All but two pieces of jewelry are recovered and all three gunmen are eventually apprehended (Arpee 1964 p.217-218).
  • In 1932...

    In 1932...
    Construction begins on new federally-funded Post Office building, designed by Ralph Milman in the art deco style (pictured). The new building cost $60,000 to construct. The post office opens the following year (Arpee 1964 p.220). Walgreen Drug Co. leases the space in the Anderson Building formerly occupied by the Lake Forest Trust and Savings at the corner of Deerpath and Western Av. The lease period is ten years. (Lake Forester 9-22-1932).
  • Police Department installs radio receivers

    The Lake Forest Police Department installs radio receivers in three squad cars. Before this time communication between the station and officers on patrol is conducted entirely over the telephone at eight call boxes at various locations around town (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).
  • First Church of Christ, Scientist, holds first service

    The First Church of Christ, Scientist, holds its first service in the Lake Forest Masonic Temple (Lake Forester 7-27-1945).The Masonic Temple is the future home of the Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Historical Society.
  • C.W. Folds house burns down

    The home of investment banker C.W. Folds completely burns down. Damages are estimated at $75,000, ruining the fire department's year-long record of keeping fire loss below $1,000 (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety).
  • In 1933...

    Tuition at St. Mary's School is $1 per month according to school archives (Chicago Tribune 9-20-1992). Prohibition is repealed in the United States.
  • Civilian Conservation Camp (CCC) in the Lake Forest area

    Fort Sheridan morphs into an Army-supervised Civilian Conservation Camp (CCC), which is one of the most popular New Deal programs, since it provides 3 million jobs during the Great Depression. One thousand men from the CCC spend ten years working on the Skokie Lagoons projects. Beginning in 1933, these men created 7 lagoons, 5 dams, and 2 drainage ditches.
  • In 1934...

    In 1934...
    The Lake Forest Police department installs two way radio communication in squad cars with a 15-watt transmitter located in the police station (pictured) replacing the one way radio receivers used previously (Lake Forester 7-27-1945). The Lantern, a pub and restaurant, opens (Pioneer Press 12-3-1999).
  • Alcott School becomes Bell School

    Alcott School becomes Bell School
    Alcott School becomes Bell School in honor of the school’s proprietor Allen C. Bell. It has been informally referred to as the Bell School for years (The Lake Forester and Lake Forest News 1945)
  • Francis E. Manierre becomes mayor

    Francis E. Manierre becomes mayor
    Francis E. Manierre becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • In 1935...

    The Little Wool Shop, a knitting shop, opens; it moves to 255 E. Market Square around 1936.
  • Lake Forest High School opens

    Lake Forest High School opens
    Lake Forest High School, a Works Progress Administration project, opens its doors. The school is designed by Anderson and Ticknor in the Georgian Colonial style in order to blend in with the surrounding estate properties (Arpee 1964 p.225 and Van Sickle, 1986). Prior to this, Lake Forest students attended Deerfield-Shields High School in Highland Park. Raymond Moore is the first principal of Lake Forest High School.
  • WPA murals painted at Gorton School

    Murals are painted in the school assembly hall at Gorton School, representing fire, earth, water and air, as part of the United States Federal Art Project - a program created during the Great Depression to help create jobs for Americans. Ralph Henricksen was commissioned to paint the four murals ("But Not Forgotten").
  • Coldest day on record

    Lake Forest experiences its coldest day yet on record. The temperature drops to 25 degrees below zero. On the 27th, it is so cold that Lake Michigan is frozen across to Michigan City. When a fire breaks out at the home of Mrs. Abby Farwell, firefighters have a difficult time putting out the blaze because the water from their hoses freezes the moment it hits anything solid (Arpee 1964 p.223).
  • In 1937...

    A library is added onto Halsey School. Smith’s Men’s Store opens at 662 Western Av. (Pioneer Press 12-30-1999). Regular members of the Lake Forest fire department are given the opportunity to train in Chicago (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety).
  • Kent Chandler becomes mayor

    Kent Chandler becomes mayor
    Kent Chandler becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Willard Morrison constructs the first Deepfreeze

    Willard Morrison constructs the first Deepfreeze
    Willard Morrison (pictured) constructs the first Deepfreeze in his basement at 650 Northmoor Rd. in Lake Forest. The next year production of Deepfreezers begins at the Davis Street Plant in North Chicago. A patent is issued for the Deepfreeze in 1944.
  • Skokie Valley floods

    Skokie Valley floods
    A large part of the Skokie Valley floods after heavy rain. The Deerpath underpass is completely flooded (Lake Forester 7-7-1938).
  • Fire at the Deerpath Inn

    Fire at the Deerpath Inn
    The Deerpath Inn catches fire. It is rebuilt and reopened later this year (Arpee p. 321). The fire starts in the kitchen and spreads to the chimney causing most of the third floor to be destroyed (Lake Forester 7-7-1938). The fire is captured on film and turned into a Universal newsreel.
  • In 1939...

    The City Council passes an ordinance creating the office of the city manager. Mr. John C. McNicol, head of the Water Department, is appointed City Manager. A new building is constructed on the southeast corner of Illinois Road and Bank Lane. The basement and ground floor is occupied by Janowitz Grocery while the second floor is divided into three apartments.
  • In 1940...

    The population of Lake Forest is about 7,200. Lake Forest College’s football team is undefeated.
  • Richard H. Mabbatt becomes mayor

    Richard H. Mabbatt becomes mayor
    Richard H. Mabbatt becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • In 1941...

    In 1941...
    The City purchases 58 acres of Villa Turicum for park purposes, but the saga of the former McCormick estate is far from over.
  • In 1942...

    The City Council approves an ordinance to authorize the Mayor to carry out blackouts and air raid protection measures. The area's first hot-lunch program is established at Everett School by Mrs. O.D. Cooper, with lunches costing just 20 cents a week or 75 cents a month. Ernest Johnson is president of Lake Forest College.
  • Lake Forest Hospital completed

    Lake Forest Hospital completed
    Lake Forest Hospital, designed by Anderson and Ticknor, is completed. In 1940, The City Council approved the construction of a new hospital facility on 24 acres of land east of the Skokie donated by Mrs. A.B. Dick Sr. The Alice Home Hospital becomes a dormitory at Lake Forest College.
  • First controlled atomic reaction

    The first controlled atomic reaction is conducted by Enrico Fermi for the Manhattan Project below Stagg Field at the University of Chicago.
  • Office of Civilian Defense organized

    Office of Civilian Defense organized
    Mayor Charles F. Clarke organizes the Office of Civilian Defense as a clearinghouse for officers looking for accommodation during their training at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. Many Lake Foresters give up rooms or entire wings of their houses, in order to house these men (Arpee 1964 p.238). Pictured: Defense Recreation Cottage on McKinley Road.
  • Charles F. Clarke becomes mayor

    Charles F. Clarke becomes mayor
    Charles F. Clarke becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Blackler Market closes

    Blackler Market, the oldest food store in the community, closes its doors.
  • J.E. Fitzgerald sells his property

    J.E. Fitzgerald sells his property at 253 E. Deerpath to Elizabeth Arden of New York (Lake Forester 8-24-1945).
  • Edward K. Welles becomes mayor

    Edward K. Welles becomes mayor
    Edward K. Welles becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Ridge Farm Preventorium closes

    The future Grove School building is no longer needed as a preventorium due to the discovery of streptomycin and other drugs used to decrease the amount of people affected by tuberculosis in the United States (Ridge Farm Preventorium by Historic Certification Consultants).
  • The Church of the Covenant founded

    The Church of the Covenant is founded as a Protestant non-denominational church. Members are mainly from other towns, not Lake Forest. The next year, 1947, the church purchases the former Methodist Church building on Deerpath and McKinley Road.
  • Lake Forest Academy purchases Mellody Farms

    Lake Forest Academy purchases Mellody Farms
    Lake Forest Academy purchases Mellody Farms, the J. Ogden Armor estate, from the Frank J. Lewis foundation and the school moves to its new home today (Arpee 1964 p.249-250).
  • In 1948...

    In 1948...
    The City enters into a lease agreement for use of the Young Men’s Club for City recreational, educational, and social purposes. Bennett Hall is designed and built by the Stanley T. Anderson firm as a replacement for the original wooden structure of the building at Ridge Farm (Ridge Farm Preventorium by Historic Certification Consultants)
  • John O. Giles becomes mayor

    John O. Giles becomes mayor
    John O. Giles becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Grace Methodist Church expands

    Grace Methodist Church expands and Northrup Chapel, Fellowship Hall, a new sanctuary and a fireplace room are added onto the building. In 1959 an education building is also added to create more room for Sunday school students.
  • In 1949...

    In 1949...
    The first Lake Forest Board of Education is organized. School District 115 is formed and the administration of Lake Forest High School (pictured) is transferred to Lake Forest. A small group of women form a partnership and open the Lake Forest Book Store; the only other bookstore in town is in a small corner of a department store (Lake Forester 2-25-1999, Lake Forest Book Store website).
  • Two stores open on Market Square

    The Forest Bootery opens at 284 E. Market Square in the space formerly occupied by Jahnke Flower Shop (Lake Forester 5-1-1949) Helander’s Stationary moves to Market Square (Pioneer Press 12-3-2009).
  • Lake Forester stars in Hollywood film

    Lake Forester stars in Hollywood film
    Rose Mary Emma (professional name Joan Taylor), daughter of Deerpath theater manager Joseph C. Emma, stars in her first Hollywood film, “Fighting Man of the Plains.” She goes on to enjoy a long Hollywood career starring in over 37 films. (Lake Forester 10-21-1949). Taylor is pictured on the right.
  • In 1950...

    The population of Lake Forest is 7,819. A change of the date of Lake Forest Day is considered due to the incident of polio cases. There is a fire at the home of Mrs. John E. Baker on Deerpath Av. on March 13. Damages are estimated at $7,500 (Lake Forester 3-16-1950). The Board of Education of School District 67 purchases 31.35 acres east of the Skokie River to be used for Deerpath School.
  • New convent for Sisters of Mercy

    A new convent opens for the Sisters of Mercy at the Church of St. Mary. It has the capacity to house 14 nuns. The convent will be home to eight sisters who teach a group of 250 Roman Catholic children in the area (Lake Forester 3-23-1950).
  • Walter Paul McBride becomes mayor

    Walter Paul McBride becomes mayor
    Walter Paul McBride becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • In 1951...

    The LFHS Football team wins 1951 North Suburban Conference title (Lake Forester 11-15-1951). Marie A. Skinner, Lake Forest’s first librarian, and a Lake Forest College graduate, dies at 75. She helped organize the first library in 1899 and served as librarian until 1903 (Lake Forester 1-25-1951).
  • Senator Richard M. Nixon visits Women’s Republican Club

    Senator Richard M. Nixon visits Women’s Republican Club
    California Senator Richard M. Nixon plans to speak at Women’s Republican Club (Lake Forester 2-15-1951).
  • General MacArthur visits Lake Forest

    General MacArthur visits Lake Forest
    General Douglas MacArthur drives through Lake Forest on the way to Milwaukee. Activities relating to the General’s visit are focused at the corner of Sheridan Rd. and Deerpath and include the grade school band (Lake Forester 4-26-1951).
  • In 1952...

    Alfred E. Hamill resigns as president of Lake Forest Library after 27 years (Lake Forester 5-15-1952) A new post, captain of the Lake Forest police force, is created by the City Council. Alex Brebner is named captain and assumes his new duties on January 15 (Lake Forester 1-10-1952).
  • School news in 1952

    On March 20 the Illinois Supreme Court approves the split between the High School District of Lake Forest and Lake Bluff and Deerfield-Shields Township High School District 113 after a three year dispute (Lake Forester 3-27-1952).
  • March of Dimes drive

    Workers begin canvassing for a polio drive for the March of Dimes (Lake Forester 1-10-1952).
  • Charles F. Glore Memorial Field House built at Lake Forest Academy

    Charles F. Glore Memorial Field House built at Lake Forest Academy
    Lake Forest Academy breaks ground for the new Charles F. Glore Memorial Field house and Gymnasium. The building is named for Charles F. Glore, longtime president of the Academy board of trustees. (Lake Forester 7- 24-1952)
  • In 1953...

    In 1953...
    The Lake Forest population is 7,819 (Lake Forester 2-12-1953). The City Council establishes the Lake Forest Playground and Recreation Board. Lake Forest Travel Bureau is founded by Mrs. J. Calvin Knotter (pictured) on East Deerpath (Lake Forester 4-6-1953).
  • New Deerpath Bridge

    The City Council approves $50,000 for a new Deerpath bridge to replace the current, dilapidated bridge over the East Skokie Draining Ditch. The money for the safer and more modern structure comes from the state motor fuel tax fund (Lake Forester 2-5-1953).
  • Chamber of Commerce founded

  • Building at Ferry Hall razed

    Building at Ferry Hall razed
    Old Ferry Hall, a Lake Forest landmark since 1869, is razed in July. The two wings added in 1888 are also torn down (Lake Forester 7-9-1953). The building is replaced by tennis courts.
  • In 1954...

    In 1954...
    The first season of the Deerpath Art League opens on October 24 (Lake Forester 10-21-1954). Lake Forest residents pass a resolution against proposed state toll road (Lake Forester 11-4-1954). The old police garage on North Forest Av. (pictured) is torn down in September (Lake Forester 9-30-1954). A hailstorm on August 3 produces hail up to 1.75 inches in diameter (Lake Forester 8-5-1954).
  • March of Dimes drive

    1954 opens with a huge contribution campaign for the March of Dimes. Lake County plans to raise $180,000 with Lake Forest raising $25,000 of that total. This is in response to the large number of polio cases in the United States in 1952 and 1953 (Lake Forester 1-21-1953).
  • Elliott Donnelley becomes mayor

    Elliott Donnelley becomes mayor
    Elliott Donnelley takes the oath of office as the new mayor of Lake Forest on May 3 (Lake Forester 5-6-1954).
  • Deer Path School opens

    Deer Path School opens
    Deer Path School opens for the first time for grades 4-8. It is the first new school building in Lake Forest since 1894 (“A Decade at Deer Path” brochure, 1984). This project has been in the works since 1952 when the school board bought 30 acres of land on Deerpath, just west of Green Bay Rd., for new school building (Lake Forester 5-8-1952). Later that year on November 29, voters gave approval on the issuing of bonds for the proposed Deer Path upper elementary school.
  • In 1955...

    Lake Forest has a population of 8,963 (Lake Forester 11-10-1955). The first Deerpath Art League Art Fair is held in Market Square on September 11. Twenty-five artists are invited to take part (Lake Forester 7-28-1955). The North Shore electric train line is discontinued.
  • Halsey School is torn down

    Halsey School is torn down
    Halsey School is torn down and turned into a parking lot for the Lake Forest City Hall after the completion of Deer Path School (Lake Forester 8-19-1975)
  • Bell School expansion

    Bell School expansion
    The Bell School announces plans for expansion and the introduction of a kindergarten and additional educational and recreational facilities. This coincides with the retirement of Allen C. Bell after 50 years (Lake Forester 4-28-1955).
  • A new playground

    A decision is taken by the Lake Forest Playground and Recreation board to construct a new recreation center as an addition to the Deer Path School. The estimated cost is $130,000. (Lake Forester 2-10-1955).
  • New pharmacy in town

    Ward Henry McMasters opens his own pharmacy after living in Lake Forest for 17 years and working as a pharmacist for Willis S. Griffis at his store on Market Square. McMasters Pharmacy is located at 584 N. Western (Lake Forester 7-26-1956).
  • In 1956...

    A $10 vehicle tag for passenger cars must be purchased and affixed to cars by March 1. This is the first vehicle tag in Lake Forest history (Lake Forester 2-9-1956). The City Dump closes May 19 (Lake Forester 5-10-1956). The City passes an ordinance regulating the architectural design of buildings within the city and establishing the Building Review Board. Kay’s Konfectionary opens (Pioneer Press 6-9-2005). Lake Forest Academy begins its 100th year (Lake Forester 9-20-1956).
  • New dormitory at Lake Forest College

    A new women’s dormitory is the first building planned and under construction in Lake Forest College’s “Design for a Second Century” (Lake Forester 6-7-1956).
  • McCormick homes torn down

    McCormick homes torn down
    Walden, the home of the late Cyrus Hall McCormick, and Villa Turicum (pictured), the home of the late Mrs. Edith Rockefeller McCormick are razed. The removal of the mansions makes way for new housing subdivisions (Lake Forester 12-13-1956).
  • In 1957...

    The police department purchases a radar device to monitor vehicle speed (Lake Forester 10-10-1957). Lake Forest Hospital has a bumper baby crop. There are 18 babies in the maternity ward which is designed to house only 11 (Lake Forester 2-28-1957). The City Council approves of proposed improvements to Woodland Rd east of Western Ave. and of Deerpath in front of the Lake Forest Library (Lake Forester 6-6-1957).
  • Lake Forest College celebrates Centennial

    Lake Forest College celebrates its Centennial. Miss Ellen Holt is a special guest at Founder’s Day. Her father Devillo Holt was one of the founders of the college (Lake Forester 2-7-1957). Henry R. Luce, editor of Time, Life and Fortune is the speaker at an Anniversary dinner March 26 (Lake Forester 3-7-1957). Physician Arthur Compton is centennial commencement speaker (Lake Forester 6-6-1957).
  • Morrison Waud elected mayor

    Morrison Waud elected mayor
    Morrison Waud is elected mayor of Lake Forest (Lake Forester 4-11-1957). Mayor Waud proclaims Lake Forest Day as a city fair and that it shall be observed as a holiday in the City of Lake Forest (Lake Forester 8-1-1957).
  • Everett School opens

    Everett School opens
    A new Everett School opens. The new building is just down the road from the original building, which is converted into a fire station (pictured).
  • Art Institute loans paintings to Lake Forest College

    Art Institute loans paintings to Lake Forest College
    The Art Institute of Chicago loans half a million dollars worth of paintings to Lake Forest College to be shown in a centennial art exhibit (Lake Forester 5-16-1957).
  • Robert Frost visits Lake Forest Academy

    Robert Frost visits Lake Forest Academy
    Poet Robert Frost visits Lake Forest Academy as the Centennial Homecoming Speaker (Lake Forester 11-7-1957).
  • Sheridan School opens

    Sheridan School opens
    Sheridan School is dedicated on Sunday, February 10, 1957 and opens on September 6 of the same year. The $365,000 building will help relieve the overcrowding of Gorton School. This project has been in the works since early 1956, when excavation for the school, at the corner of Sheridan Rd. and Spruce Av is completed. It’s the first of three neighborhood schools granted by the taxpayers in a referendum April 1955. (Lake Forester 1-12-1956, 2-7-1957).
  • Lake Forest Symphony holds first performance

    The group that later becomes the Lake Forest Symphony holds its first performance at First Presbyterian Church in the spring. The performance is a memorial concert for Robert Kalter, Lake Forest School’s music department chair and teacher, and is organized and conducted by Dr. William English (Legacy Collection materials).
  • Ground breaking for Faith Lutheran Church

    A ground breaking ceremony for the new Faith Lutheran church is held (Lake Forester 8-8-1957).
  • In 1958...

    The City approves the process of fluoridating Lake Forest’s water supply. Explosion and fire destroys an unoccupied house at Kennedy and Ridge Roads (Lake Forester 9-4-1958). A new water plant is designed to meet the needs of residents up to the year 2000 (Lake Forester 9-4-1958).
  • New ‘push-pull’ suburban trains

    New ‘push-pull’ suburban trains are instituted to serve Lake Forest. These trains never need to be turned around, making them immediately ready for return trips (Lake Forester 11-27-1958).
  • New south wing at School of St. Mary

    A new south wing is built onto the School of St. Mary at a cost of $500,000. Eight classrooms, a library, a gym, and a cafeteria are built.
  • Aircraft prohibited from landing in Lake Forest

    In response to numerous resident complaints, the City Council passes an ordinance prohibiting the landing of aircraft within the city limits. The army turns down city’s plea to ban Fort Sheridan planes. Residents believe that the plans are a hazard to their lives and homes (Lake Forester 3-6-1958).
  • Bell and Day School merge

    The Bell and Day Schools merge to form Lake Forest County Day School. Each school will operate separately until September 1959 (Lake Forester 5-29-1958).
  • Tri-state Tollway opens

    Tri-state Tollway opens
    The Tri-State Tollway opens, providing a direct connection with the Edens Expressway north to the Wisconsin border. This new tollway borders Lake Forest to the west (Lake Forester 7-24-1958).
  • In 1959...

    In 1959...
    Rotary Club is started in Lake Forest for businesses and professional executives (Lake Forester 12-17-1959). A new subdivision, Woodview Acres (pictured), receives approval from the city council. The subdivision is an extension of N. Western Ave. It will feature businesses as well as condos (Lake Forester 9-24-1959). First Presbyterian Church celebrates their centennial (Lake Forester 10-13-1959)
  • New wing added to Lake Forest High School

    New wing added to Lake Forest High School
    A new, $2 million wing is added to Lake Forest High School. The new wing includes physics and chemistry laboratories, a greenhouse and an auditorium. A new Student Personnel Center is also included (Lake Forester 9-17-1959).
  • Illinois Bell building constructed

    The new Illinois Bell building at 155 East Deerpath is dedicated. This is another step toward Lake Forest receiving dial telephone service (Lake Forester 8-29-1959).
  • Deer Path Community Music Association organized

    The Deer Path Community Music Association is organized by residents to bring orchestra and choral music to Lake Forest and Lake Bluff (Lake Forester 1-22-1959). This organization will later be known as the Lake Forest Symphony.
  • Lake Forest Savings and Loan Association robbed

    Lake Forest Savings and Loan Association is robbed by a masked gunman who makes off with $2,115 (Lake Forester 3-5-1959). When the robber, John Edward Seney, is caught on May 3, after traveling to Las Vegas, Hollywood, and finally back to Chicago, only $.32 is left. The FBI praises the Lake Forest Police for their work on the case (Lake Forester 5-7-1959).
  • Major storm hits

    After a storm batters Lake Forest, it is estimated that 75 to 100 trees are lost and at least 800 live wires go down (Lake Forester 10-1-1959).
  • In 1960...

    Dial telephone service begins on May 16 (Lake Forester 5-12-1960). Local population reaches 10,687 (Lake Forester 6-2-1960). Plans for a new sewer system are proposed at a hearing on August 22. The new sewer system would eventually replace all septic tanks and cost residents an estimated $1,000 to $1,500 per home (Lake Forester 8-25-1960). Dr. William Graham Cole is inaugurated as the 10th president of Lake Forest College (Lake Forester 11-17-1960).
  • George R. Beach Jr. becomes mayor

    George R. Beach Jr. becomes mayor
    George R. Beach Jr. becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Country Day School building project

    Lake Forest Country Day School completes its building program (Lake Forester 3-17-1960).
  • Commercial construction projects

    Buildings are knocked down to make way for a new apartment and shopping complex at 580 Bank Lane. This is the first project of its kind since Market Square was built (Lake Forester 9-1-1960). The construction of a seven store shopping center on Western Av south of Illinois Rd is scheduled to begin January 1, 1961 (Lake Forester 12-15-1960).
  • Construction at Academy of the Sacred Heart and Barat College

    Construction at Academy of the Sacred Heart and Barat College
    A $2 million building project is announced for the Academy of the Sacred Heart and Barat College. After completion of the project the Academy of the Sacred Heart will be renamed Woodlands Academy (Lake Forester 4-7-1960).
  • Senator John F. Kennedy visits

    Senator John F. Kennedy visits
    Presidential candidate Senator John F. Kennedy visits the area (Libertyville) during a trip to Chicago (Lake Forester 10-20-1960).
  • Lake Forest celebrates centennial

    Lake Forest celebrates centennial
    Lake Forest celebrates its centennial. Senator Barry Goldwater is the centennial speaker. The Lake Forester celebrates with a special centennial edition of the newspaper outlining the history of the town (Lake Forester 2-16-1961).
  • In 1961...

    A fire at the Onwentsia Club rips through a 30 room servants quarters. It takes the fire department three hours to prevent the fire from spreading (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety). Residents who want to build atomic bomb or fall-out shelters at their homes must apply to the Office of Civil and Defense Mobilization for a permit and qualifications. This way residents will know to what extent the shelter will protect them (Lake Forester 9-28-1961).
  • Birds in the news

    A pair of peacocks escape from the story high enclosure at Barat College on February 20. They elude capture by the Lake Forest police by flying 40 feet up into the trees (Lake Forester 2-23-1961). A saw-whet owl is caught in a local garage. A child takes the owl to school where Mrs. Mildred Rulison, a local naturalist, talks to the children about the owl and its habits. Mrs. Rulison calls the local Audubon Society where the owl is banded and set free (Lake Forester 10-26-1961).
  • School news

    The Academy of the Sacred Heart is moved to a separate campus from Barat College and becomes the Woodlands Academy of the Sacred Heart.
  • Dutch Elm Disease found

    476 Dutch Elm Disease cases are found in Lake Forest and more are anticipated. The city begins spraying the trees (Lake Forester 8-17-1961).
  • Robert Frost visits Lake Forest Academy

    Robert Frost visits Lake Forest Academy
    Poet Robert Frost speaks at Lake Forest Academy for their special centennial program. This is Frost’s second visit to Lake Forest (Lake Forester 10-19-1961)
  • 7 digit telephone numbers instituted

    Lake Forest changes over to a seven number telephone system. Instead of CE4-2300 the number will now be 234-2300 (Lake Forester 10-26-1961).
  • In 1962...

    Advice columnist Ann Landers gives a talk entitled “Trouble--What Else” on Oct. 26 at LFHS auditorium. Proceeds from the lecture benefit professional services of counselors in family guidance (Lake Forester 10-18-1962). Garret M. Bax sells Lake Forest Jewelry Store, at 268 East Deerpath, after 35 years of operation (Lake Forester12-6-1962).
  • Lake Forest High School honored, hosts first exchange student

    Lake Forest High School hosts its first foreign exchange student. Mats Janelid, who is from Sweden, joined his American “family,” the Frank Barths, at their home on McKinley Road (Lake Forester 8-16-1962). Lake Forest High School’s “pioneer efforts” to move education forward are cited by the educational chief of the House of Representatives Commission on Education and Labor. The school’s course offerings are noted as groundbreaking (Lake Forester 9-27-1962).
  • Lake Forest College building projects

    The Lake Forest College board of trustees approves a resolution permitting the college to proceed with architects Perkins and Wills on preliminary drawings and site location for a new library building (Lake Forester 10-4-1962). The college also proceeds with building plans for two 120 bed dormitories (Lake Forester 12-27-1962).
  • Ferry Hall expands

    Ferry Hall is expanded. A new administration wing is added, freeing up classroom space. The structure is situated between North and Smith Hall (Lake Forester 8-30-1962).
  • The Lake Forest Public Works building is completed

    The Lake Forest Public Works building is completed
    The Lake Forest Public Works building at 110 East Laurel Avenue is completed and ready for citizen’s inspection at their upcoming open house. The $264,000 building is meant to “provide a more economical control of men, time and equipment” (Lake Forester 10-11-1962).
  • Cherokee School dedication ceremony

    Cherokee School dedication ceremony
    Cherokee School holds its dedication ceremony. There is an open house including a tour of the building. Donald Lehigh, school principal, delivers the dedication address (Lake Forester 10-18-1962). The ground groundbreaking ceremony was held for Cherokee School in 1961 after the school board approved construction of the school the previous year. The school has have two kindergarten rooms and twelve class rooms and cost approximately $400,000 (Lake Forester 12-8-1960).
  • In 1963...

    In 1963...
    The City adopts the Official Plan for the City of Lake Forest, to control in a rational manner its future growth. The Left Bank restaurant opens at 659 N. Bank Lane (Chicago Tribune 1-26-1992). The Lake Forest police department purchases a new one-man radar unit (pictured) (Lake Forester 1-3-1963).
  • Michael Cudahy becomes mayor

    Michael Cudahy becomes mayor
    Michael Cudahy becomes mayor of Lake Forest. He passes the centennial pin along to Evanston. The pin was originally struck for Marshall Field in 1954 to celebrate the store's centennial (Lake Forester 8-8-1963).
  • Lake Forest Hospital expands

    Lake Forest Hospital expands
    Lake Forest Hospital is given approval to begin construction on an ICU unit for critically ill patients (Lake Forester 4-4-1963), and purchases new Poloroid 3000X equipment that delivers finished X-rays 10 seconds after exposure (Lake Forester 2-21-1963)
  • The Church of the Holy Spirit expands

    The Church of the Holy Spirit demolishes the old residence next to the church, which has been used as classrooms, and begins a $410,000 school addition to accommodate increased membership and school attendance (Lake Forester 5-2-1963).
  • Swim records, baseball playoffs

    Bath and Tennis Club swimmers set five meet records and one national Junior Olympic record at a swim meet at Columbus Park pools in Chicago (Lake Forester 8-8-1963). Lake Forest’s Junior American Legion baseball team qualifies for the state playoffs by beating Fox Lake. (Lake Forester 7-25-1963).
  • Ferry Hall record enrollment

    Ferry Hall has a record enrollment of 162 girls in its 95th year (Lake Forester 8-29-1963).
  • Onwentsia Club stables renovated

    The Onwentsia Club stables are renovated and reopened with a riding exposition (Lake Forester 4-18-1963).
  • Maria von Trapp visits Woodlands Academy

    Maria von Trapp visits Woodlands Academy
    Baroness Maria von Trapp (pictured), whose life story was the basis of the Broadway hit “The Sound of Music.” speaks at Woodlands Academy (Lake Forester 4-25-1963).
  • French consul speaks at LFC commencement

    Jean Beliard, Consul General of France in Chicago, is the 1963 commencement speaker at Lake Forest College (Lake Forester 4-25-1963).
  • Woodlands Garden Club organized

    The group that would eventually become the Woodlands Garden Club is organized. In April 1965 the club affiliates itself with The Garden Clubs of Illinois, Inc. The group continues to be involved with many beautification projects throughout Lake Forest (Woodlands Garden Club History).
  • Lake Forest Club builds new clubhouse

    The Lake Forest Club breaks ground on a new $150,000 clubhouse. John Kittermaster is the contractor and Paul McCurrey is the architect (Lake Forester 10-10-1963).
  • Northwestern Railroad freight house torn down

    Northwestern Railroad freight house torn down
    The old Northwestern Railroad freight house (1500 N. Western) is demolished to make room for city parking (Lake Forester 11-21-1963).
  • Lake Foresters honor President John F. Kennedy

    Lake Foresters honor President John F. Kennedy
    Lake Foresters honor President John F. Kennedy who was assassinated November 22. All city offices are closed, businesses fly flags at half mast, and Mayor Cudahy sends a telegram to Mrs. Kennedy expressing the sympathies of Lake Forest residents. Area churches, including St. Patrick’s, hold special services (Lake Forester 11-28-1963).
  • In 1964...

    In 1964...
    Air Kool, a heating, cooling ,refrigeration and ice machine company, opens. The controversial Colburn House (pictured) is approved by a review board. The design is thought by some to be too dissimilar to the houses around it. The house is located at the corner of Lake Road and Spring Lane (Lake Forester 2-6-1964). The rat infestation in lakeside ravines is a health hazard to Lake Forest residents (Lake Foresters 12-10-1964).
  • Lake Forest history book published

    Lake Forest history book published
    The book “Lake Forest, Illinois 1861-1961” by Edward Arpee is published by the Lake Forest Rotary Club (Lake Forester 2-6-1964).
  • New construction at Lake Forest College

    Ground is broken for a third unit in the South Campus Quadrangle at Lake Forest College. The project will cost $946,000 (Lake Forester 1-16-1964).
  • Older brother of Dalai Lama visits Lake Forest College

    Thubten Jigme Norbu, eldest brother of the Dalai Lama, the exiled ruler of Tibet, gives a public lecture at Lake Forest College (Lake Forester 2-13-1964).
  • Lake Forest Hospital’s new intensive care unit opens

    Lake Forest Hospital’s new intensive care unit opens for patients. It is built in memory of Jean Schweppe Armour (Lake Forester 4-2-1964).
  • Touch tone calling available

    Touch tone calling is made available for Lake Forest and Lake Bluff. Buttons are used in this “distinctive new way of calling” instead of a dial (Lake Forester 4-23-1964).
  • Church of the Holy Spirit renovations complete

    Church of the Holy Spirit renovations complete
    The Church of the Holy Spirit holds a dedication week in October for its new building and renovated nave (Lake Forester 10-8-1964).
  • Ridge Farm purchased by Grove School

    The former Ridge Farm Preventorium property is purchased by Grove School, a school for children with mental and/or physical handicaps. The goal of the school is to help the children achieve emotional maturity and stability, understand how to interact appropriately in social situations, and learn effective language and communicative skills.
  • In 1965...

    Sunset Food Mart, an independent grocery store from Highland Park, opens a store in Lake Forest (Chicago Tribune 8-18-1999).
  • School improvements

    The residents of High School District 115 vote 3-1 to approve the High School referendum for a $1,150,000 bond to pay for additions and improvements to the school (Lake Forester 2-18-1965). This vote comes after The Lake Forest High School Board of Education unanimously adopts the recommendations of the Citizens Consulting Firm for expanding the facilities at Lake Forest High School the previous year (Lake Forester 11-26-1964). This plan was formed instead of building a new high school.
  • Donnelley Library dedicated

    Lake Forest College formally dedicates the Donnelley Library May 1st. The new building cost $1,200,000 (Lake Forester 4-29-1965).
  • Airplane crash in Lake Michigan

    A United Airlines New York to Chicago flight crashes into Lake Michigan about 16 miles off the coast of Lake Forest. There are no survivors and the Highland Park High School gym serves as a temporary morgue for the victims (Lake Forester 8-25-1965).
  • Alice Lodge torn down

    The Alice Lodge at Lake Forest College is torn down. Before being converted into a dorm, the Lodge had been the site of the Alice Home Hospital (Lake Forester 9-22-1965).
  • Willard K. Jaques becomes mayor

    Willard K. Jaques becomes mayor
    Willard K. Jaques becomes mayor of Lake Forest (Lake Forester 4-20-1966).
  • In 1966...

    Chief of Police Stewart Guess retires on August 1 (Lake Forester 3-23-1966). Parents form a committee to plan a Montessori pre-school in Lake Forest (Lake Forester 4-6-1966). The first members of the Police-Fire cross training program are sworn in (Lake Forester 4-27-1966). John Foster opens Lake Forest Tailors at 730 Western Av. (Lake Forester 7-1-1976). Three barns off of Ridge Road burn on three consecutive days. Arson is suspected (Lake Forester 5-11-1966).
  • LFCDS builds library and science building

    Lake Forest Country Day School breaks ground on a new $400,000 library and science building (Lake Forester 7-6-1966). Lake Forest Country Day School launches a $2 million development plan. The plan aims to increase educational programming without drastically increasing enrollment (Lake Forester 2-18-1965).
  • New utility tax

    The Lake Forest City Council passes a 5 percent tax on utilities becoming the second North Shore municipality to do so. 117,000 in revenue is expected from the tax and will be used to cover increased city costs (Chicago Tribune 4-10-1966).
  • Lake Forest Hospital gets new addition

    Lake Forest Hospital gets new addition
    Construction begins on Lake Forest Hospital’s new addition (Lake Forester 6-29-1966). Lake Forest Hospital announced the plans for a $2 million addition the previous year. The addition consists of a three story, 77 bed, completely air conditioned wing on the southwest end of the building that will house surgical and pediatric patients (Lake Forester 6-3-1965).
  • Forest Park Beach House opens

    Forest Park Beach House opens
    The Forest Park Beach House is opened for use. The building contains modern restrooms and patio vistas over Lake Michigan (Lake Forester 7-6-1966).
  • Martin Luther King Jr. leads march in Chicago

    Martin Luther King Jr. leads a march in Chicago to draw attention to the fair-housing campaigns taking place
  • In 1967...

    Chicago Blackhawk stars Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita are the special guests of the V.J. Killian Co. at their store opening in Lake Forest January 23 (Lake Forester 1-18-1967). The contract for widening Western Avenue from Onwentsia Rd. to Westleigh Road is awarded to Lakeland Construction Co. Work will begin as soon as weather permits (Lake County 2-15-1967). S & R Television celebrates the grand opening of their new store at 1375 N. Western Avenue on April 8 and 9 (Lake Forester 3-29-1967).
  • Steve Goodman attends Lake Forest College

    Folk music singer and songwriter and future songwriter of “Go Cubs Go,” Steve Goodman (1945-1984), transfers from the University of Illinois to Lake Forest College. He leaves after three semesters when it is discovered that his chronic fatigue is, in fact, leukemia (Miller, Lake Forest College in the Loop timeline, 2010).
  • Lake Forest Open Lands Association founded

    Lake Forest Open Lands Association is founded for the purpose of acquiring open land through tax-free gifts and bequests. The land will then be made available to provide recreational and conservation areas for the enjoyment of all (Lake Forester 7-26-1967).
  • New athletic facility at Lake Forest College

    Construction of a new athletic and health facility at Lake Forest College is approved (Lake Forester 3-15-1967).
  • New Subdivision

    Lake Forest City Council approves the tentative plat for the first section of Kennedy-Rasmussen property in West Lake Forest. They approve the entire 365 home subdivision (Lake Forester 1-25-1967). In 1966 the Lake Forest Plan Commission approved the quadrant of the Kennedy-Rasmussen property for the subdivision (12-14-1966).
  • Walk up teller windows open

    First National Bank opens a drive and walk up teller windows at the Chicago and North Western railroad station. It is the first facility of its kind in the Chicago area (Lake Forester 7-26-1967).
  • Snowstorm hits Lake Forest

    Snowstorm hits Lake Forest
    Light snowfall on January 23 developed overnight into the worst snowstorm to hit the North Shore since the turn of the century. A snowfall of 19 inches is reported in Lake Forest (Lake Forester 2-1-1967).
  • New reservoir

    Construction of an additional two million gallon reservoir at the Waukegan and Westleigh Road pumping station begins (Lake Forester 3-22-1967).
  • Lake Forest College students protest the Vietnam War

    Lake Forest College students protest the Vietnam War
    Lake Forest College students and faculty peacefully march to Market Square protesting the Vietnam War. The march coincides with a national protest in Washington (Lake Forester 10-25-1967).
  • In 1968...

    The city council tentatively approves a new open housing ordinance. It provides for fair housing in Lake Forest and also makes changes in the licensing of real estate brokers (Lake Forester 5-8-1968). The Lake Forest city council votes to widen the 4 mile length of Green Bay Road , despite residents’ urging to keep Green Bay a “nice pokey road with beautiful trees”(Lake Forester 7-31-1968).
  • Plans for new high school

    The 22 members of the Lake Forest Citizens Committee recommend that the city build another high school on a new site. Five years ago a similar proposal was defeated and instead an addition was added to the present high school (Lake Forester 5-29-1968). The board of Lake Forest High School picks a site for a second high school at the corner of Rt. 41 and Westleigh Road (Lake Forester 9-25-1968).
  • Edward Arpee honored

    Edward Arpee is honored at a testimonial dinner for 37 years of teaching, coaching, advising, humoring, and being friends with four decades of Lake Forest Academy students (Lake Forester 1-17-1968).
  • Large estates shrinking

    More and more Lake Forest mansions and expansive sculptured grounds are being sold and subdivided. It is believed that fewer individuals have wealth enough to own and maintain such large estates (Lake Forester 5-22-1968).
  • Businesses close; change hands

    After 55 years, Max Cohn closers the oldest one-man business in Lake Forest—his little grocery store on the corner of McKinley and Woodland Avenue (Lake Forester 10-2-1968). Charles A. and Joseph Kiddle sell their store, Kiddles Bike and Sport, to Ron Shlifka. The store is one of the oldest businesses in Market Square. Kiddles opened in Market Square in1922, having moved from a shop that stood “at approximately the back end of the Deerpath Theatre” in 1919 (Lake Forester 10-2-1968).
  • O’Neill’s celebrates 100 years

    O’Neill’s hardware store celebrates 100 year anniversary. In the store’s 100 years of operation it has seen four buildings, three major fires and three owners named Joseph (Lake Forester 10-2-1968).
  • School District 67 reorganized

    The schools in District 67 are reorganized. 5th and 6th graders, who previously attended Gorton School, are moved to the old Deer Path School building. 7th and 8th graders are moved to the newly constructed Deer Path School building, and elementary school students are divided among Cherokee School, Everett School, Sheridan School, and Gorton School (A.P.T. News, Spring, 1968).
  • Vietnam War protests

    Students and faculty of Lake Forest College participate in the Vietnam War protests surrounding the Democratic Convention August 26-28 held at Chicago’s International Amphitheater at the Stockyards (Schulze, Cowler, Miller, p.155, Lake Forest College in the Loop, Miller, 2010).
  • In 1969...

    Dimitrios Jewelers opens on Market Square. It later moves to Deerpath and Bank Lane (Pioneer Press 11-26- 2009). Janowitz Finest Foods becomes Don’s Finest Foods when Don Ruffolo takes over the store from the previous owner, Louis Janowitz, who has operated the store for 45 years. The store later moves to Western Av. (Pioneer Press 9-16-1999, Lake Forester 7-30-1969). Time Inc. buys the Lake Forester, incorporating it into the Pioneer Press chain of newspapers (Pioneer Press 8-5-1996).
  • Bruce MacFarlane becomes mayor

    Bruce MacFarlane becomes mayor
    Bruce MacFarlane becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Turnover at Barat College

    The Society of the Sacred Heart is no longer able to afford to operate Barat College and turns governance of the college over to an independent Board of Trustees.
  • Bell School torn down

    Bell School torn down
    The Bell School building is torn down (Lake Forester 6-25-1969).
  • Trees spryed for Dutch Elm Disease

    Harold Robson, Superintendent of Parks and City arborist, has announced that the tree care section of the parks department will be spraying 3,300 elm trees during the month of April in an attempt to control Dutch Elm Disease (Lake Forester 4-9-1969).
  • New subdivision

    The pink Italian villa on Green Bay Road is razed by a subdivider to make way for 10 deluxe suburban homes in a new subdivision called Tara Highlands. The house is sold to the developer after five years on the market because a buyer for the 14-acre estate that includes an 8 bedroom guest house and a 24 stall stable could not be found (Lake Forester 5-28-1969).
  • Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Community Associates of the Art Institute of Chicago founded

    Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Community Associates of the Art Institute of Chicago is founded (Legacy Collection Materials).
  • Deer Path School dedicated

    Deer Path School is dedicated (Lake Forester 1-15-1969). This project has been in the works since the Lake Forest Board announced plans for a new elementary school to be built adjoining Deer Path School to serve 7th and 8th grades whilst the existing building serves 5th and 6th graders. The taxpayers are asked to approve a bond issue of $2.6 million (10-10-1966). The bond is approved on October 19, 1966.
  • Fire Department moves

    The Lake Forest Fire Department moves to a new home at 255 W. Deerpath (City of Lake Forest website Public Safety).
  • Public Safety building opens

    The Lake Forest Public Safety building opens with an official open house. It’s located at 255 West Deerpath (Lake Forester 4-30-1969).
  • Interior of Lake Forest College gym destroyed in fire

    Arson is suspected in a fire that destroyed the interior of Lake Forest College’s North gym on June 4, 1969. Four Molotov cocktails are found in the building (Lake Forester 6-11-1969).
  • Ferry Hall celebrates 100 years

    Ferry Hall celebrates its 100th anniversary. Senator Charles H. Percy, ballerina Maria Tallchief and poetess Gwendolyn Brooks speak at a four-day seminar celebrating the school’s centennial in October (Lake Forester 9-17-1969).
  • College students protest Vietnam War

    Students and faculty at Lake Forest College and Barat College join hundreds of other colleges and universities in a national moratorium protesting the Vietnam War on October 15, 1969. The protests include both on and off campus activities (Lake Forester 10-15-1969).
  • In 1970...

    Eugene Hotchkiss III is president of Lake Forest College. The City of Lake Forest faces difficulties due to population increases. The community is expected to reach saturation by 1985 (Lake Forester 1-5-1970).
  • Kent Chandler Jr. becomes mayor

    Kent Chandler Jr. becomes mayor
    Kent Chandler Jr. becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • New subdivision

    The Lake Forest Plan Commission approves the Katz-Weiss Subdivision, to be called ‘Crystal Point of Lake Forest,’ on N. Western Avenue. These are the city’s second free-standing apartment project (Lake Forester 2-15-1970, 2-9-1970).
  • Protest at Fort Sheridan

    Protest at Fort Sheridan
    Lake Forest College students stage a sit-down outside the gates to Fort Sheridan. The road sitters are carried kicking and struggling off the highway by marshals amidst chants of “Peace Now!” (Lake Forester 4-11-1970).
  • Lake Forest Jewelers robbed

    Lake Forest Jewelers is held up on April 20, 1970. Two men entered the store at 268 Deerpath shortly after it opened. The men strong-armed the owner and forced him into the back room where they bound and gagged him. They took nearly 20 trays of rings, watches and solid gold jewelry (Lake Forester 4-23-1970).
  • Gorton School closes

    Dist. 67 board votes unanimously to close Gorton School, saving $300,000 per year for repairs, $28,000 in salaries, and $22,000 for annual operating costs (Lake Forester 2-11-1971). There is concern it will be demolished (Lake Forester 2-18-1971). New attendance boundaries for three elementary schools in Lake Forest have been redrawn by school officials to absorb students who attended Gorton School (Lake Forester 4-29-1971).
  • In 1971...

    Center Stage, a volunteer community theater company, has its first performance, Bells are Ringing, in July (Center Stage website). Hjertehjem, a Scandinavian clothing and gift shop, opens.
  • Most photographed house in Lake Forest

    Most photographed house in Lake Forest
    The Colburn house at 700 Lake Road is the most photographed house in Lake Forest. It’s been on display for the Art Institute, Bryn Mawr College and other organizations. Ironically, before a building permit was issued, a public hearing was held due to a difference of opinion about the aesthetic value of the house. The architect-owner is Ike W. Colburn (Lake Forester 12-16-1971).
  • West Campus at Lake Forest High School built

    West Campus at Lake Forest High School is built. It is used by Lake Forest freshman and sophomore students; juniors and seniors attend the original East Campus.
  • Murder in Lake Forest

    Lake Forest Police are investigating the murder of Gabriella Betic, 11, on October 27, 1971 (Lake Forester 11-4-1971). Betic’s half-brother, Rolf Betic and his friend, Ralph Clouser of Lake Bluff are charged with her murder after they confessed to police (Lake Forester 11-11-1971).Rolf Betic and Ralph Clouser will stand trial in Lake County starting on February 23, 1972 (Lake Forester 11-18-1971). Beltic is sentenced to 23 to 60 years in prison escaping the death penalty.
  • Gorton Community Center Committee formed

    Residents of Lake Forest, led by Mr. and Mrs. H. Brooks Smith, form the Gorton Community Center Committee and rally to save the building from demolition. The committee’s efforts succeed and the building is converted into the Gorton Community Center (Gorton Community Center pamphlet 12-1972). Gorton School, having stood vacant for 18 months, will be open for community meetings. It will be called “Gorton Community Center” (Lake Forester 12-21-1972).
  • Construction Codes Commission established

    The City Council establishes the Construction Codes Commission to review matters pertaining to the building construction codes of the city.
  • Historical Society formed

    Historical Society formed
    The Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Historical Society holds its first organizational meeting at the Lake Forest Public Safety Building (pictured). At the meeting a steering committee is appointed to recruit board of directors. The Historical Society holds its first meeting Sunday, Oct. 15 at 3:30 at the Durand Institute of Lake Forest College. Annual memberships are $1.00 for students, $5.00 for adult or family, and $25.00 for sustaining. Life memberships are $100.00 each (Lake Forester 10-12-1972)
  • In 1973...

    Helen Jahnke opens Happy Hooker, a needlecraft shop, at 202 Wisconsin Av (Pioneer Press 8-21-1980). One third of the 15 bridges maintained by the city of Lake Forest are deteriorated to the point of being restricted or closed (Lake Forester 2-8-1973). Beginning October 1, residents are able to burn leaves and 19- year-olds are able to drink wine and beer due to a new state law (Lake Forester 9-13-1973). The gym ceiling at the Recreation Center across from the City Hall is falling down.
  • Aidan I. Mullett becomes mayor

    Aidan I. Mullett becomes mayor
    Aidan I. Mullett becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Lake Forest’s oldest building torn down

    Lake Forest’s oldest building is torn down. The building, a rooming house at 314 Wisconsin Av., was once part of the Lake Forest Hotel (Old Hotel) which originally stood in what is now Triangle Park and was the first home of Lake Forest Academy. The building is 116 years old (Lake Forester 6-21-1973).
  • Roloson designs restaurant

    Robert M. Roloson, architect and native Lake Forester, known for designing houses that fit the lifestyle of families with several children, designs the Gallery Restaurant on Westminster. Its manager and part owner is his cousin, Larry Ross (Lake Forester 1-18-1973).
  • New additions at hospital

    Lake Forest Hospital plans for a comprehensive expansion of the new construction and additions to the hospital. Two new building—a nursing home and a central services building will take place in years 1 and 2. Later, a nondenominational chapel and multipurpose meeting room and advanced x-ray equipment will be added to the present hospital building (Lake Forester 9-27-1973).
  • Smoking privileges may be revoked at high school

    West Campus at Lake Forest High School may have to end student smoking privileges due to girls sneaking cigarettes in the washrooms and litter in the designated smoking area (Lake Forester 3-22-1973).
  • Ferry Hall and Lake Forest Academy merge

    Ferry Hall and Lake Forest Academy join to become a single coeducational institution (Pridmore 1994 p. 1). Students begin attending classes at the Academy and the Ferry Hall building is gradually converted into condominiums (Pioneer Press 7-28-1983).
  • First woman alderman nominee

    First woman alderman nominee
    Virginia Fiester, first woman alderman nominee in 113 year council history, is announced. She is one of two Lake Forest Caucus nominees for seats on the City Council (Lake Forester 1-31-1974).
  • Radioactive sand spilled on U.S. 41

    20 barrels of radioactive sand are spilled in an accident in the southbound lanes of U.S. 41 north of Old Elm Road. The Atomic Energy Commission reports that there is no danger to public health (Lake Forester 10-10-1974).
  • James Swarthout becomes mayor

    James Swarthout becomes mayor
    James Swarthout becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • In 1975...

    The A & P Grocery on Deer Path closes in November.
  • Westmoreland nursing home opens

    Lake Forest Hospital opens the Westmoreland nursing home. The $4.1 million facility located on the hospital grounds opened to an estimated 800 people who attended the dedication (Lake Forester 7-3-1975).
  • Bomb destroys principal's car

    A car belonging to Lake Forest High School principal Arthur Kleck is destroyed when a bomb set under it exploded. The 1968 Buick was parked on Ivy Ct. No one was injured (Lake Forester 12-25-1975).
  • Lake Forest Preservation Foundation formed

    The Lake Forest Preservation Foundation is formed by Gayle Dompke and Edward H. Bennett, Jr. The organization is committed to preserving Lake Forest’s visual character (News/Voice 7-31-1986).
  • Sylvia Haskins dies

    Sylvia Haskins, famed sculptress, died at age 81 in the home of her daughter, Alice Ryerson. She was the daughter of Howard Van Doren Shaw. She was most widely known for her garden sculpture “The Little Gardener” that is in the Rose Garden of the White house and “Mary Dyer” displayed in front of the Massachusetts state house (Lake Forester 9-7-1978).
  • Baker property subdivided

    A subdivision of the Baker mansion property next to the Lake Forest Library is given tentative approval today (Lake Forester 8-5-1976).
  • O’Neill’s becomes O’Neill’s True Value Hardware

    O’Neill’s becomes O’Neill’s True Value Hardware after the business is sold to new owners. They hold a grand opening for the remodeled store in early September
  • Gorton listed on National Register of Historic places

    The Gorton school building is listed on the National Register of Historic places for its historical and architectural distinction.
  • In 1977...

    Guidelines for the implementation of the Lake County Housing Plan are approved. The plan is to create more low to moderate income housing (Lake Forester 11- 3-1977). The City Council approves a tennis “bubble” at the Lake Forest Club. The bubble may be up only from November 1 to May. It is to be subject to inspection by the local fire and building departments. One objection to the bubble is that it would “glow” at night (Lake Forester 12-8-1977). Smithfield Gardens, landscapers, opens.
  • Two movies shoot in Lake Forest

    Kirk Douglas and Amy Irving visit Lake Forest to film a scene for the movie “The Fury.” Most of the filming is done on the beach (Lake Forester 8-25-1977). Scenes for the movie “Omen II” are filmed at Lake Forest Academy. The film stars William Holden and Lee Grant (Lake Forester 11-3-1977).
  • Building permit issued for mall

    A controversial building permit is issued for a mall development at the corner of Woodland and Western Ave. after a three year dispute between the developer and the city. The city is also ordered by the Lake County Circuit Court to issue a permit for either a McDonalds or Burger King (Lake Forester 11-10-1977). The City Council approves a plan for a Burger King the following year (Lake Forester February 16, 1978).
  • AYSO organized

    AYSO (American Youth Soccer Organization) is organized in Lake Forest with 25 teams (17 male and 8 female) (Lake Forester 11-10-1977).
  • In 1978...

    The residents of Lake Forest approve the construction of a new City recreational facility to be located at Deerpath Park. Market Square is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. An attempt to dissect property at 55 Green Bay Road in a vital part of Lake Forest that would erode one of its historic neighborhoods was rejected at the City Council meeting. A compromise plan was agreed upon (Lake Forester, 5-18-1978).
  • Frank Waldeck becomes mayor

    Frank Waldeck becomes mayor
    Frank Waldeck becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Ferry Hall campus becomes condominiums

    A plan to develop the Ferry Hall campus grounds into 40 private residences (condominiums) known as Mayflower Park is developed. The creators of this plan, Robert Hixon Glore and Edward Noonan, attempt to maintain the character of the buildings (Chicago Sun-Times 5-19-1978). The conversion of the building to condos starts in 1979 (Lake Forester 10-4-1970).
  • Official Comprehensive Plan of 1978

    The City adopts the “Official Comprehensive Plan of 1978” to assist the future planning and development of the City in a manner traditional to Lake Forest.
  • Two new stores in Lake Forest

    Right Track is opened in the shell of the CNWRR train depot. The store sells flowers, healthy snacks and gift items. Owner Marsha Noble holds a grand opening on January 21 (Lake Forester 1-19-1978). The Boutique, a storefront next to the Deerpath Theater at 284 E. Deerpath, will house Young Hahn, a designer’s, original clothing (Lake Forester 6-8-1978).
  • Baker House restored

    The Baker House at 404 Deerpath is being restored. The house, built in 1869 by Dr. Charles Quinlan, was slated to be torn down, but The Foundation for Historical Preservation protested and is able to save the house (Lake Forester 1-26-1978).
  • Snow storm

    The worst snow storm since 1967 hits Lake Forest. A foot of snow and 50 mile an hour winds bring Lake Forest to a standstill. The schools and many businesses are closed for two days and five foot snow drifts approach the record (Lake Forester 2-22-1978).
  • Lake Forest battles Duch Elm Disease

    The City of Lake Forest continues to battle with Duch Elm Disease. Sixty trees that are either dead or infected are removed from public property to help prevent the spread of the disease (Lake Forester 9-14-1978).
  • Pinecroft estate subdivide

    The Pinecroft estate is subdivide into residential lots. The 75-year-old main house will be retained (Lake Forester 9-21-1978.
  • Ragdale to become artist colony

    Ragdale to become artist colony
    Alice Ryerson presents a plan to form an artist colony on the Ragdale estate. The estate was originally built by her grandfather, Howard Van Doren Shaw (Lake Forester 2-16-1978). The plan gets tentative approval in March (Lake Forester 3-9-1978). Ragdale officially opens to artists today although they have been staying at the estate informally for the last two years (Lake Forester 8-17-1978).
  • Chicago Bears build training facility

    The Chicago Bears football team builds a training facility on the campus of Lake Forest College named for the team founder George Halas. A twenty-five year lease in signed that gives the building to the college in 1999 (Lake Forest College in the Loop, Miller 2010).
  • New ordinance to protect trees

    A new ordinance is proposed prevent the loss of trees on public property and parkways while mantaing the visual charater of Lake Forest. The ordinance outlines the size and spacing of trees to be planted and the period of time during which the developer is responsible for tree maintenance (Lake Forester 2-1-1979). The new law is tentatively approved on November 5, 1979 (Lake Forester 11-8-1979).
  • In 1979...

    Shortages of gasoline are reported in Lake Forest as gas prices soar. Prices range from 79 to 89 cents per gallon (Lake Forester 5-10-1979). Barat College and Woodlands mark their 75th anniversary (Lake Forster 9-20-1979). Students from Barat College and Woodlands Academy of the Sacred Heart begin a year-long celebration (Lake Forester 9-27-1979).
  • Westwood Square Shopping mall opens

    After a year delay, Westwood Square Shopping mall opens. 10 stores have leased space: The Clockworks, The New Store, Forrest TV, Babe Rainbow, A Shady Place, Farrar & Co., Village Carpet, Samuels Leather, Burger king, and A Dash of Class will open. Hirsch and Lowenstein are the architects for the mall (Lake Forester 9-11-1979).
  • “Ordinary People” starts filming

    Filming for Robert Redford’s “Ordinary People” begins at Lake Forest High School (Lake Forester 10-18-1979). Donald Sutherland and Mary Tyler Moore have been cast in leading roles (Lake Forester 9-27-1979). Redford seeks 400 extras for his movie (Lake Forester 10-4-1979).
  • Lake Forest Academy chapel damaged by fire

    Lake Forest Academy chapel is damaged by fire that broke out at about 8:30 p.m. There were no injuries, but damage is termed “quite extensive” (Lake Forester 2-15-1979).
  • Residents call for moratorium blocking development of historic properties

    A group of Lake Forest residents hope to gather 2,000 signatures calling for reinstatement of a moratorium blocking development of historic properties in the city. A house at 481 Oakwood is believed to have been constructed between 1860 and 1900 and was approved a permit to raze the property before the moratorium blocking development of historic property. That ban has now expired (Lake Forester 9-20-1979). It was demolished in December (Lake Forester 12-13-1979).
  • Havenwood demolished

    The historic Havenwood estate is demolished in October. The 30 room estate was designed in 1913 by Howard Van Doren Shaw and once residence of Edward laird Ryerson. A 31-lot subdivision will replace it. (Lake Forester 10-18-1979).
  • CROYA established

    CROYA (Committee Representing Our Young Adults) is established.
  • First Edward Arpee Memorial Essay Contest

    The Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Historical Society awards the first Edward Arpee Memorial Essay Contest Prize to Karen L. Amendola (Legacy Collection materials).
  • Gerhard E. Seidal becomes mayor

    Gerhard E. Seidal becomes mayor
    Gerhard E. Seidal becomes mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Residential Historic Preservation Ordinance adopted

    The City adopts the Residential Historic Preservation Ordinance to regulate development and aesthetic alterations to historically significant areas and to preserve the ambiance of Lake Forest.
  • old Fire and Police station becomes National Historic Landmark

    old Fire and Police station becomes National Historic Landmark
    The old Fire and Police station (South Gate Café) at 665 N. Forest Ave. becomes a National Historic Landmark.
  • Barat College becomes coeducational

    Barat College becomes a coeducational institution.
  • In 1982...

    Village Quilters, a quilting bee of Lake Forest and Lake Bluff women, is formed (Legacy Collection materials). Sweets, a candy and ice cream shop, opens on Deerpath west of Walgreen’s. The store later moves to the corner of Deerpath and Bank Lane (Pioneer Press 1-19-2006).
  • In 1983...

    Dans Un Jardin opens at 227 E. Westminster (Pioneer Press 5-4-2006).
  • West Campus at Lake Forest High School closes

    West Campus at Lake Forest High School closes due to declining enrollment and students are reunited in the main campus. Warren Township High School rents West Campus after its school is destroyed in a fire.
  • Market Square donated as public park

    Robert Meers and John Coleman donate Market Square to the City to be used as a public park. In this way, Market Square will “forever be protected in its current historical appearance resembling the park designed by Howard Van Doren Shaw in 1915.” Meers and Coleman bought the square from the shareholders on the Lake Forest Improvement Trust for $4.4 million in 1983 (News and Voice 11-22-1984).
  • Frank Farwell elected mayor

    Frank Farwell elected mayor
    Frank Farwell is elected mayor of Lake Forest after a contested election. An independent candidate, Norman Smith, challenges Farwell, the Lake Forest Party 1984 caucus endorsed candidate (Chicago Tribune 3-6-1984). .
  • Touchtone Theater founded

    Touchtone Theater is founded by Ina Marlowe. The theater company operates out of Woodlands Academy (Lake Forester 11-7-1987).
  • New store on Market Square

    Talbot’s, a women’s clothing store, opens at 251 Market Square in the space previously occupied by the Deerpath Gallery, Little Wool Shop, the Water Closet, and Well’s Secretarial School (Lake Forester 8-2-1984).
  • In 1985...

    B. Dalton Booksellers opens at 680 Western Av. on Market Square in July. The façade of the building is restored to the way it looked in the early 1900s when it was a pharmacy (Lake Forester 5-2-1985). The Deerpath Theater closes.
  • Police begin motorcycle patrol

    The Lake Forest Police Department begins a motorcycle patrol. This patrol allows police officers better access to parks, bike paths, beaches and school yards (Forest and Bluff 11-2003).
  • Arcade to join Market Square and Market Square Courtyard

    Construction on an arcade joining Market Square to Market Square Courtyard begins (News and Voice 1-31-1985).
  • Ragdale acquired by City

    Ragdale acquired by City
    The City of Lake Forest acquires the historic Ragdale property and maintains it as the fourth-largest artist colony in the nation.
  • In 1986...

    Williams-Sonoma opens a store on Market Square in October replacing The Village Cobbler (News and Voice 7-17-1986). The Gorton’s Children’s Drop-in center is opened. The non-profit center provides as needed daycare for children whose parents need time to volunteer in the community. The Smith Hall at Ferry Hall is destroyed in a fire (Lake Forester 5-29-1986).
  • Proposal for new office building passes

    Broadacare Management Company’s proposal to replace a 20 space parking lot behind the post office with a two story commercial/office building is passed by a unanimous vote of the Lake Forest City Council (News and Voice 6-19-1986).
  • The Lake Forest Sports Shop changes name

    Ellen Stirling, owner of The Lake Forest Sports Shop, changes the store’s name to The Lake Forest Shop. The store is located on Market Square. Stirling is the granddaughter of the stores founder Margret Baxter Foster (Pioneer Press 9-13-2007).
  • First Baptist Church recognized for historical significance.

    Henry P. Wheeler, president of the Lake Forest Foundation for Historic Preservation, presents a plaque to the First Baptist Church recognizing its historical significance.
  • Church News

    St. Mary’s begins a preschool program (Lake Forester, 1986). St. Patrick’s Church is renovated is accordance with the principles of the Second Vatican Council.
  • Record rainfall

    Lake Forest receives more than ten inches of rainfall between September 22 and September 30 causing flooding throughout the community. Governor Thompson declares Lake County a disaster area and calls for Lake County to be declared a Federal disaster area as well.
  • In 1987...

    Anna Schuster opens Anna’s of Lake Forest, an antique store. The Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate branch opens at 514 N. Western Av. Lake Forest Beach reopens on Memorial Day after rehabilitation funded through the City.
  • Marshall C. Strenger elected mayor

    Marshall C. Strenger elected mayor
    Marshall C. Strenger is elected mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Ground breaking at Conway Park

    Ground breaking at Conway Park
    Cabot, Cabot & Forbs break ground on Conway Park, an office building complex northeast of the Tri-State Tollway andRoute 60 (Chicago Tribune 9- 29-1986).
  • Deer Path School receives award

    Deer Path School receives the National Excellence Award from the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Marshall Field’s renovated

    The Marshall Field’s store on Market Square is renovated. After the renovations are complete the store will offer women and junior girl’s apparel only because the location is too small to carry a proper assortment of china, crystal and linens (North Shore 7-1987).
  • Lake Forest Police install new computer dispatch system

    In May, the Lake Forest Police Department installs Motorola computer dispatch systems in squad cars. The new system allows officers to look up information such as outstanding arrest warrants and driver’s licenses, without radioing in to the dispatcher. This system can save officers time and encourages them to run more routine checks of vehicles (Lake Forester 10-22-1987).
  • Cherokee School receives award

    Cherokee School is one of 250 schools nationwide to win the U.S. Education Department’s National Excellence Award, the highest educational award in the country.
  • Conway Park Annexation

    Conway Park Annexation
    The City of Lake Forest annexes the Lake Forest Academy and Conway Farms properties.
  • New shopping center

    Wacker Properties receives approval to build The Lake Forest Shopping Center, a 44,550 square-foot shopping center on Skokie Highway south of Old Elm Road (Chicago Tribune 3-13-1988).
  • Church of St. Mary renovated

    The Church of St. Mary is renovated. The interior walls are improved, and new pews, carpeting, and air-conditioning units are installed. The church is expanded, and seating is installed around the altar (Lake Forester 1-11-1988).
  • Village Quilters hold first Quilt Show

    The Village Quilters hold their first Quilt Show at the Gorton Community Center. At the show, they raffle off a quilt called “Village Stars,” a group project by the women in the guild (Legacy Collection materials).
  • In 1989...

    Municipal officials enact the nation’s first building-scale ordinance to regulate the demolition of residences and the construction of oversized replacements. Jordan McClanahan, a home furnishing store, opens at 508 Bank Lane.
  • In 1990...

    The population of Lake Forest is 17,836. Amidei Mercatino, an outdoor food market located in an ally at 235 Southgate, opens (Forest and Bluff 9-2003). Lisa Johnson founds Lake Forest Photo & Digital on Western Av. The store later moves a block south to 620 N. Western Av. (Pioneer Press 6-14-2007). The Toy Station opens on Market Square (Lake Forester 1-13-2005).
  • Charles Clarke Jr. elected mayor

    Charles Clarke Jr. elected mayor
    Charles Clarke Jr. is elected mayor of Lake Forest.
  • School of St. Mary receives award

    The School of St. Mary receives the Excellence in Education Award from the United States Department of Education.
  • 911 system implemented

    The city’s 911 system is implemented. Residents can now reach all Lake Forest emergency services at one number.
  • Conway Farms Golf Club opens

    The Conway Farms Golf Club opens.
  • In 1992...

    The Deer Path Inn is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The School of St. Mary celebrates its 75th anniversary (Lake Forester 9-17-1992). Artist Margo McMahon creates a sculpture, “Mother and Child,” in honor of the anniversary (Chicago Tribune 9-20-1992). Postal Express Center (later PostNet) opens at 825 S Waukegan Road as a one stop shipping, copy and printing center (Pioneer Press 12-13-2007).
  • Medicare funding is revoked from the Grove School

    The Health Care Financing Administration accuses the Grove School of violating the requirements for receiving Medicare funding because the school is caring for adults but was built to care for children. The government decides to revoke Medicare funding for the Grove School. Without Medicare, which previously helped pay for about 45% of each resident’s care, it will be difficult for the school to run (Chicago Tribune 4-1-1994).
  • New commuter train station

    New commuter train station
    A new commuter train station is built on the Milwaukee Road line. The station is designed by Richard Geudtner in a “modified English Norman style” and is 6,000 square feet (Chicago Tribune 7-20-1992).
  • Rhett Butler elected mayor

    Rhett Butler elected mayor
    Rhett Butler is elected mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Lake Forest High School renovated

    Lake Forest High School enters the final phase of a construction and renovation project that has added 110,000 square feet of new academic and athletic space and includes a newly constructed academic wing, teaching gym and pool (Lake Forester 2-1993).
  • Robertson’s Men’s Wear closes

    Robertson’s Men’s Wear closes at the end of February after 70 years in business (Pioneer Press 1-14-1993).
  • In 1994...

    Chef Gerhard Greub opens Gerhard’s Elegant European Deserts (Forest and Bluff 12-2003). Lake Forest Hardware opens at 825 S. Waukegan Road (Pioneer Press 10-30-1997).
  • Grove School is closed down

    Grove School is closed down (Chicago Tribune 4-1-1994).
  • Everett school celebrates its 80th birthday

    Everett School celebrates its 80th birthday with a week of festivities. One of the highlights of the celebration, which is funded by the Preservation Foundation, is the unveiling of the restored Everett Schoolhouse Bell.
  • Lake Forest Symphony recognized

    Lake Forest Symphony is recognized as Illinois Orchestra of the Year by the Illinois Council of Orchestras (Legacy Collection materials).
  • Cornelius Waud is elected mayor

    Cornelius Waud is elected mayor
    Cornelius (Ron) Waud is elected mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Mellody Farm Nature Preserve to be built

    Lake Forest Open Lands is granted permission to build the Mellody Farm Nature Preserve on the west side of Lake Forest after months of debate between Open Lands and Newell’s Reserve subdivision (Lake Forester 12-5-1996).
  • Historic Preservation Commission created

    The Lake Forest City Council votes to create the Historic Preservation Commission. The commission is formed to investigate the question of when a building is historic and needs to be preserved and when it is just a liability to a developer and can be torn down (Lake Forester 8-15-1996).
  • School of St. Mary opens new Primary Grade Center

    The School of St. Mary opens the new Primary Grade Center on Everett Road, creating a second campus for grades preschool through third (Chicago Tribune 9-28-1997). St. Mary’s original facility is now called the Upper Grade Center and is upgraded by an addition a new science lab, art room and music room along with other renovations.
  • James Anderson Company named Illinois Centennial Business

    The James Anderson Company is inducted into the Illinois Centennial Business Program (Legacy Collection Materials).
  • Additions to St. Patrick's Church

    A new cruciform church and ministry center are added on to St. Patrick’s Church and the Parish Center is renovated.
  • Cultural Arts Commission created

    The City Council votes to create the Cultural Arts Commission. The commission is tasked with promoting cultural events in Lake Forest (Lake Forester 6-12-1997).
  • O’Neill’s True Value Hardware closes

    O’Neill’s True Value Hardware closes in late summer (Pioneer Press 7-31-1997).
  • In 1998...

    The Bank Lane Bistro opens at 670 Bank Lane (The Sun 8-20-1998). The Lake Forest Fitness Center opens at 400 Hastings Road (Parks and Recreation mailing). The Lake Forest Symphony begins using the Grove School building for lessons, recitals, and storage (Lake Forester 9-10-1998).
  • Historical Society moves

    The Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Historical Society moves into its first museum building at 361 E. Westminster, the former Masonic Lodge (Legacy Collection materials).
  • Presbyterian Homes Lake Forest Place opens

    Presbyterian Homes Lake Forest Place, a retirement and assisted living community, has its grand opening. Construction started in September 1996 (Lake Forester 11-13-1997).
  • In 1999...

    The Lake Forest Bank and Trust Company begins work on the Market North project along Westminster. Lovell’s Restaurant is opened by astronaut Captain James Lovell at 915 S. Waukegan Road. In 2001 Lovell’s son, Jay, buys the business from his father (Forest & Bluff 5-2007).
  • Howard Kerr is elected mayor

    Howard Kerr is elected mayor
    Howard Kerr is elected mayor of Lake Forest.
  • St. Patrick’s Church celebrates in 150 anniversary.

    St. Patrick’s Church celebrates in 150 anniversary.
  • Market Square rededicated

    Market Square is rededicated after the Market Square 2000, non-for-profit corporation, implemented the landscape plan developed by Rodney Robinson and funded by the Lake Forest Garden Club (Lake Forester 9-30-1999).
  • In 2000...

    The population of Lake Forest is 20,059. Baytree National Bank and Trust opens in October at 266 E. Deerpath. The Grove School building is turned into a senior citizen center and a permanent home for the Lake Forest Symphony. This plan was approved in 1999 (Lake Forester 9-23-1999). Hamdy’s, a Mediterranean restaurant, opens at 654 Bank Lane (Pioneer Press 1-11-2001).
  • Deer Path School is reconfigured

    Deer Path School is reconfigured into a 5-8 school. 4th grade students are moved to Cherokee, Everett, and Sheridan schools. Deer Path School is expanded and improved in terms of safety, academics, capabilities, etc.
  • Historical Society wins award

    The Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Historical Society wins its first award of excellence, from the Illinois State Historical Society and the Illinois Association of Museums (Legacy Collection materials).
  • In 2001...

    Bailey & Heart Interiors Ltd. opens at 506 N. Western Ave.(Forest and Bluff 7-2001). Stephen D. Schutt is president of Lake Forest College.
  • Barat College is purchased by DePaul University

    Barat College is purchased by DePaul University.
  • In 2002...

    The Down Town Dog opens in October at 644 Bank Lane (Pioneer Press12-5-2002). Under the Purple, a store specializing in women’s undergarments opens at 638 Bank Lane (Forest and Bluff 12-2003).
  • John E. Preschlack is elected mayor

    John E. Preschlack is elected mayor
    John E. Preschlack is elected mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Church of the Holy Spirit celebrates 100th anniversary

    The Church of the Holy Spirit celebrates its 100th anniversary (Pioneer Press June 20, 2002). The Archbishop of Canterbury visits the church in celebration of its centennial anniversary (Lake Forester October 10, 2002)
  • Arzu founded

    Connie Duckworth, a Lake Forest resident, foundsArzu, a nonprofit organization that helps Afghani women achieve economic empowerment through the weaving and selling of rugs. The organization also encourages literacy among Afghani women (Forest and Bluff 1-2006 p.52).
  • In 2004...

    The Grille on Laurel opens at 181 East Laurel Av. In May, Jewels of Lake Forest opens at 284 E. Deerpath Road (Forest and Bluff). The Lake Forest Book Store moves into the space vacated by B. Dalton on Market Square (Pioneer Press 2-5-2004).
  • Woodlands Academy celebrates 100 years in Lake Forest

    Woodlands Academy celebrates its 100th anniversary in Lake Forest (Pioneer Press 6-3-2004).
  • Deer Path Inn celebrates 75th anniversary

    Deer Path Inn celebrates 75th anniversary
    The Deer Path Inn celebrates its 75th anniversary (picture from 1980s).
  • Lake Forest becomes a Home Rule community

    Lake Forest residents pass a referendum designating Lake Forest as a Home Rule community (Lake Forester 11-4-2004).
  • In 2005...

    Blink Optical opens at 654 Bank Lane (Forest and Bluff). Deer Path’s Student Service club raises over $1,400 for tsunami relief efforts (Pioneer Press 1-27-2005). Nonno’s Caffé opens in August at 231 E. Wisconsin Avenue.
  • S. Michael Rummel is elected mayor

    S. Michael Rummel is elected mayor
    S. Michael Rummel is elected mayor of Lake Forest.
  • Barat College campus closed

    DePaul closesBarat College campus .
  • LFCDS renovations

    The Lake Forest Country Day School building undergoes a $18 million infrastructure renovation. Some significant components of this renovation are a large-scale technology upgrade, new classrooms, new Library-Media center, new art, chorus, and band rooms, science classrooms, and community gathering areas (Pioneer Press 9-21-2006).
  • In 2006...

    Dans Un Jardin closes at 227 E. Westminster after 23 years in business (Pioneer Press 5-4-2006). Mais Encore (French for “but again”) closes after 46 years in business. Pasquesi Home and Gardens closes its Lake Forest store on February 26 after 21 years in business and moves to a new location in Lake Bluff (Pioneer Press 2-23-2006). Kasia’s of Lake Forest, a Pilates studio, opens in May at 950 N. Western Avenue (Forest and Bluff 6-2006).
  • Lake Forest High School renovations

    Construction begins on renovating and expanding the Lake Forest High School’s East Campus (Pioneer Press 11-9-2006).
  • Marshall Field’s sign taken down

    The Marshall Field’s sign is taken down at the store’s Market Square branch. All 62 Marshall Field’s stores are renamed Macy’s due to a merger between the two companies (Pioneer Press 9-22-2005, 9-7-2006).
  • In 2007...

    Mandarin Chinese is added to the curriculum at Lake Forest Country Day Sschool (Pioneer Press 10-4-2007). Arabesque Dancewear Boutique opens at 644 Bank Lane on Market Square in July (Pioneer Press 8-23-2007). Chief’s Pub opens on Halloween at 502 N. Western Ave. The building used to house Martin’s Pharmacy (Pioneer Press 11-8-2007). Fiore Square retail and office center opens at Waukegan Road and Conway Road in the spring (Pioneer Press 2-16-2006). Olga Kras opens Organic Wellness Cafe
  • Lake Forest and Lakeview Academic Services opens

    Matt Kelley founds Lake Forest and Lakeview Academic Services. The Lake Forest-based program aims to provide a variety of services for students K-12 (Pioneer Press 9-10-1009).
  • First female pastor at Grace Methodist Church

    Grace Methodist Church welcomes its first female pastor, Reverend Debbie Fisher (Pioneer Press 6-28-2007).
  • Lake Forest Academy and Lake Forest College sesquicentennials

    Lake Forest Academy and Lake Forest College celebrate their sesquicentennial.
  • In 2008...

    Bobby Chi Designer Studio opens at 221 E. Westminster (Sheridan Road Winter 07/08 p.90). Clothing store J. Crew opens a store on Market Square on November 18, in the space formerly occupied by Macy’s (Pioneer Press 1-1-2009). Don’s Finest Foods closes after almost 40 years in Lake Forest.
  • Lake Forest High School addition

    The new addition to Lake Forest High School opens.
  • Woodlands Academy renovated

    Woodlands Academy is renovated. A new science wing, more tennis courts, and a performing arts center are added (Pioneer Press 1-31-2008).
  • Lake Forester at Bejing Olympics

    Lake Forester at Bejing Olympics
    Lake Forest High School graduate Matt Grevers represents the USA at the Beijing Olympics, swimming the 100 meter backstroke and the 4x100 freestyle relay (Pioneer Press 7-10-2008).
  • In 2009...

    First Presbyterian Church of Lake Forest celebrates its sesquicentennial. A new, LEED-certified Municipal Services building is constructed and opens on Field Drive. Lake Forest Academy opens the new James P. Fitzsimmons Athletic Wing (www.yourseason.com 11-5-2009). McCormick’s Restaurant & Lounge closes after almost 55 years in business (gazebonews.com 8-19-2009).
  • James J. Cowhey Jr. is elected mayor

    James J. Cowhey Jr. is elected mayor of Lake Forest.
  • In 2010...

    The population of Lake Forest is 19,375. $9,400 is raised for the Great Lakes Adaptive Sports Association during the Deer Path walkathon (www.pioneerlocal.com 5-27-2010). Jennifer Rising, a math and science coordinator and math teacher from Lake Forest Country Day receives The Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (www.pioneerlocal.com 2-11-2010).
  • Barat College property sold at auction

    The former Barat College property is sold at a foreclosure auction. Harris Bank is the sole bidder and buys the property for $12 million on May 4, 2010 (Lake Forester 1-6-2011).
  • The Fresh Market opens

    The Fresh Market opens at 850 Western Av. the former site of Don’s Finest Foods.
  • Hospital Resale Shop closes

    The Northwestern Lake Forest Hospital Resale shop closes after being in business for 84 years (Pioneer Press 10-28-2010).
  • Period: to

    The Blackhawk War

    The Black Hawk War1831-32, is fought with Chief Blackhawk of the Sauk tribe and allies in dispute of the validity of the 1804 Treaty of St. Louis, ceding then all lands between the Illinois and Fox and the Mississippi Rivers, much of the future northwestern Illinois. In the end, Blackhawk and his forces capitulated in 1832 to the mobilized U.S. military expedition; the leader was held in captivity and the tribes forced to sell their lands.
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    I & M Canal constructed

    The I & M Canal (Illinois and Michigan) Canal is constructed connecting Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River and cementing Chicago’s place as a transportation hub. The canal also helps open up North Chicago for settlers.
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    Civil War

    Calvin Durand, a future mayor of Lake Forest, fights in battles at Chickamauga and Chattanooga. He is captured at Atlanta and is imprisoned as a POW at Andersonville, SC. Lake Forest Academy students including C.V. Chandler, Fred Chapman Wilbur Norton and William Price fight in the Civil War. Other residents of Lake Forest who fight in the Civil War include James Swanton, David Fales, Mike Fitzgerald, James Stokes, Israel Parsons Rumsey and Henry McIntosh, a former slave.
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    World War I

    345 Lake Forest residents fight in WWI. Many served with the 67th Brigade of the Rainbow Division and the 86th Division. There are 16 recorded deaths; six men died in battle and ten died from disease. Stanley Gubin, a Lake Forest resident, receives a Croix-de-Guerre for singlehandedly taking 19 German prisoners at the battle of Verdun. Mrs. Albert Farwell gives ‘Navy Waffle Parties’ for men recovering at the Great Lakes Naval Hospital. Around 4,000 men attended the parties (Arpee1963, 239)
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    World War II

    Over 1,000 Lake Forest residents join the military and fight from 1941 to the end of the war. Additionally, 400 Lake Forest Academy students and 800 Lake Forest College graduates participate in the war effort. Forty Lake Forest residents do not return from the war. Lake Forest residents are present at many important events during the war including the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Battle of the Bulge and the formal surrender of Japan.
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    The Korean War

    Sgt. William S. Smith is posthumously awarded a bronze star. Smith is a graduate of Lake Forest High School and the first Lake Forester to be killed in the Korean War.