1920 - 1990

Timeline created by imperi romà
In History
  • XX Century

  • GANDHI'S PACIFIC STRUGGLE OF NON-VIOLENCE

    GANDHI'S PACIFIC STRUGGLE OF NON-VIOLENCE
    The hunger strikes were one of Gandhi's main weapons of non-violence. "Strength does not come from physical ability but from indomitable will," he said. He had the will of iron. But nonviolent civil disobedience involved other methods as well. For example, the one known as 'March of the salt'. Gandhi's pacifist struggle led India to its independence, after centuries under the rule of the British Empire. He was nominated five times for the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a world hero.
  • IRELAND BECOMES INDEPENDENT FROM THE UK

    IRELAND BECOMES INDEPENDENT FROM THE UK
    Independent Ireland, comprises four fifths of Ireland, after ending a five-year Irish struggle for independence from Great Britain. It broke ties with Great Britain and was renamed Eire, now called the Republic of Ireland.
  • TELEVISION

    TELEVISION
    John Logie Baird created television by trying to copy the electromagnetic wave system of radio. He always believed in the possibility of transmitting images by waves. It was a very advanced invention for that century. Therefore, investors did not provide financing for its development. Television was based on a system composed of two discs, one on the transmitter and the other on the receiver, attached to the same axis so that their rotation was synchronized and at a distance of 2 meters.
  • PENICILLIN

    PENICILLIN
    It was one of the first antibiotics to be invented and also one of the most widely used in the world. It was discovered by Alexander Fleming with his researchers. Later, in 1945, he would win the Nobel Prize in Medicine.
    He discovered the antibiotic in 1928 when studying a culture of bacteria that had a state of lysis due to accidental contamination with a fungus. Fleming grew the mold in a pure culture and found that it produced a substance that killed various disease-causing bacteria.
  • THE GREAT DEPRESSION

    THE GREAT DEPRESSION
    This happened after the First World War in the USA. The 1929 crisis was an "announced crisis." There was a general increase in demand. Migration to the cities increased, industrial prices increased due to protectionist policy. There was a lack of resources, agriculture, and the people earned less than their share. In the absence of economy, there was no work. In 1930 it still lasted, it was known as the great depression
  • IVENTION OF THE RADAR

    IVENTION OF THE RADAR
    Radar is a system that uses electromagnetic waves used to measure distances, altitudes, directions and speeds of static or mobile objects such as aircraft, boats, meteorological formations and the terrain itself. Its operation is based on emitting a radio pulse, which is reflected off the target and is typically received at the same position as the emitter. From this "echo" a large amount of information can be extracted. They are used in meteorology, air control, a wide variety of military uses
  • SECOND WORLD WAR

    SECOND WORLD WAR
    It was a military conflict of most of nations of the world. There were more than one hundred million soldiers. In the Holocaust, there were massive bombings of cities and were used nuclear weapons. World War II was the deadliest in history. It began with the German invasion of Poland, the first warlike step for Nazi Germany to found a German Third Reich in Europe. This produced the immediate declaration of war by France with most of the countries of the British Empire
  • SPANISH CIVIL WAR

    SPANISH CIVIL WAR
    It was a warlike conflict (later it had repercussions with an economic crisis) that was unleashed after the coup d'état of July 17 and 18, 1936 carried out by a part of the a.rmed forces against the Government of the Second Republic. A civil war began that would end on April 1, 1939 with the last part of the war signed by Francisco Franco, declaring his victory and establishing a dictatorship that would last until his death, on November 20, 1975.
  • THE INVENTION OF THE MICROWAVE OVEN

    THE INVENTION OF THE MICROWAVE OVEN
    American engineer Percy Spencer was researching possible ways to improve radar performance at Raytheon. He worked surrounded by magnetrons, devices that transform electrical energy into electromagnetic microwaves that radar uses to measure. One day, Spencer realized that the chocolate bar of his pocket was melting while standing in front of a magnetron. He had discovered that exposure to low-intensity electromagnetic microwaves heats food. Thus began the development of the first microwave oven.
  • LONDON OLIMPYCS

    LONDON OLIMPYCS
    They were the first Olympic Games, after twelve years, because they were suspended by the Second World War. They were known for "the Austerity Games". London was being rebuilt after the German bombings of the war. The 1948 London Olympics were the first to be seen on television. No new Olympic track was built. The existing ones were used in their place and Wembley Stadium was adapted to be the Olympic Stadium, with an ash track for athletics events. The Thames hosted rowing and canoeing events.
  • SIGNING OF THE NORTH ATLANTIC PACT (NATO)

    SIGNING OF THE NORTH ATLANTIC PACT (NATO)
    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) signed the Washington Treaty of 1949, through which ten countries on both sides of the Atlantic (Belgium, Canada, Denmark, the United States, France, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Countries Netherlands, Portugal and the United Kingdom) pledged to defend each other in the event of armed aggression against any of them.
  • DISCOVERY OF DNA

    DISCOVERY OF DNA
    In 1953, physicist Francis Crick and biologist James Watson demonstrated the double helix structure of DNA. They received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1962 along with physicist Maurice Wilkins. This discovery forever changed the understanding of genetics, the study of how physical and physiological inheritance is passed from generation to generation. It was very important, since today, scientists are focused on investigating how to edit DNA to correct errors and cure diseases of genetic origin
  • CREATION OF EUROVISION

    CREATION OF EUROVISION
    Europe was postwar trying to rebuild itself. The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) launched the idea of ​​an international song festival where all countries could participate in a television program, which would be broadcast simultaneously in all EBU countries. Satellite television did not exist, therefore they used microwave transmission.
  • DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD

    DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD
    On November 20, 1959, the Declaration of the Rights of the Child was approved unanimously by all 78 member states of the UN. This was adopted and approved by the General Assembly of Nations
    highlights the idea that children need special protection and care, "including adequate legal protection, before birth and after birth."
  • SPEECH OF MARTIN LUTHER KING

    SPEECH OF MARTIN LUTHER KING
    "I have a dream," said Martin Luther King, Jr. on August 28, 1963. From the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, the African American citizen rights movement reached its highest expression when King delivered his memorable speech to a crowd of approximately 250,000. A year later, the Civil Rights Act would be passed, serving as an opening to the nation's civil rights legislation.In 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated.
  • FIRST HEART TRANSPLANT

    FIRST HEART TRANSPLANT
    On December 3, 1967, Christiaan Barnard, a South African doctor, had performed the first heart transplant on a person. The donor was Denise Darvall, a 25-year-old office worker who died after being run over. The donor was Louis Washkansky, a 53-year-old businessman evicted from an irreversible heart problem and acute diabetes. The operation was carried out by 30 surgeons under Barnard and lasted nine hours.
  • ARPANET

    ARPANET
    ARPA was a computer network created by the United States Department of Defense to be used as a means of communication between different academic and state institutions during the Cold War. On October 29, 1969, the first electronic message was transmitted through the ARPANET. Less than a month later, the first link was established between the University of California, Los Angeles and the Stanford Research Institute.
  • OIL CRISIS

    OIL CRISIS
    In the end of World War II, some countries consumed oil massively. Due to the strong dependence that exists on oil from the Middle East, Western countries were plunged into a serious economic crisis while the price of oil rose. Faced with an exorbitant increase in oil prices and supply problems, many countries chose to reduce their dependence, betting on other sources of energy. Like nuclear energy.
  • APPLE & MICROSOFT

    APPLE & MICROSOFT
    Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniac began in 1976 to develop in a garage the most important computer companies of the 20th century. Apple, founded on April 1, 1976, continues to revolutionize the world of technology with its popular Macs, iPods, iPhones, and iPads. A year earlier, in 1975, Bill Gates and Paul Allen had founded Microsoft, another technology giant, essentially dedicated to the software and hardware sector. Its Xbox video game platform is also well known.
  • NOBEL PRIZE OF THE MOTHER TERESA OF CALCUTTA

    NOBEL PRIZE OF THE MOTHER TERESA OF CALCUTTA
    She was a Catholic nun, who founded the Missionaries of Charity congregation in Calcutta in 1950. For more than 45 years she cared for the poor, the sick, the orphans and the dying. Initially in India and later, her congregation, in other countries of the world. In 1979, she recived the Nobel Peace Prize and India's highest civilian award, the Bharat Ratna, in 1980, for their humanitarian work. She cared for the poor of the poorest.
  • ATTACK OF POPE JOHN PAUL II

    ATTACK OF POPE JOHN PAUL II
    On May 13, 1891, Mehmet Ali Agca from St. Peter's Square shot Pope John Paul II four times, who was blessing the people, the bullets were going straight to the heart, but the Virgin of Fatima deflected them, so although the Pope received them, he was able to recover. Currently the bullet is in the crown of the Virgin of Fatima. Later the Pope visited his attacker in jail, and forgave him. In 2000 he beatificated Francisco and Jacinta Marto seers of Fatima.
  • CHERNOBYL

    CHERNOBYL
    It was a nuclear accident of the highest level. That day, in a sudden increase in power in reactor number 4 of the plant, the hydrogen accumulated inside the core due to overheating exploded. There was a fire that lasted ten days. More than 800,000 "liquidators" dedicated themselves to "liquidating" the catastrophe, most of them ended up dead. More than 130,000 people were evacuated from the area. The area will remain contaminated and considered uninhabitable for 40 thousand years.
  • TECESCOPE WITH ACTIVE OPTIC

    TECESCOPE WITH ACTIVE OPTIC
    In 1988 the first telescope with active optics was made in Chile. This is a technology used in reflecting telescopes. Forms mirrors to prevent deformation of these due to external influences such as wind, temperature... Without active optics, the construction of 8-meter class telescopes is not possible.
  • REVOLUTION OF THE MOVIL PHONE

    REVOLUTION OF THE MOVIL PHONE
    By 1990, great technological improvements facilitated communication and skyrocketed the popularity of telephones and mobiles. In 1995, data and SMS services became available, and GSM subscribers exceeded 10 million people worldwide. In 1996, prepaid SIM cards were launched; towards the end of the decade, in 1998, the number of GSM subscribers exceeded 100 million.
  • Eurotunnel

    Eurotunnel
    The tunnel crosses the English Channel under water. Your crossing lasts approximately 35 minutes between Calais / Coquelles (France) and Folkestone (UK). It is the third longest tunnel in the world, at 50m, but it is only 39m long under water. It costs a budget of € 15,000,000,000 €. It has two tunnels reserved for rail transport, one for going and one for returning. And a gallery, is prepared for evacuations.
  • HARRY POTTER SAGA BEGINS

    HARRY POTTER SAGA BEGINS
    It was written by British author J. K. Rowling in 1997 wrote the first book. Harry potter and the Philosopher's Stone.
    The novel was rejected by several publishers until Bloomsbury Publishing set out to publish it.
    Her low economic status forced her to end the story on paper napkins. When she got his book published, it was a huge success. Sales of the books have made her a billionaire. After publishing the fourth book, she wrote two more and earmarked the proceeds for NGOs and others..
  • XXI Century