Timeline of Music Licensing

Timeline created by facebooker_10218279188907787
In Music
  • First Federal Copyright Act Passed

    There is no express protection for musical compositions, but they could be registered as "books."
  • Copyright Amended to Include Musical Works

    Exclusive rights for musical works are limited to the reproduction and distribution of compositions.
  • Copyright Expanded for Public Performance

    Rights are expanded to include the exclusive right to publicly perform musical works.
  • Copyright Expanded for Mechanical Reproductions

    Rights are expanded to include the exclusive right to make "mechanical" reproductions of songs in phonorecords. This exclusive right applied to piano rolls, then later to vinyl records and CDs. The phonorecord right was limited by a compulsory license requirement.
  • Sound Recordings Are Distinctly Copyrightable

    Congress announces that sound recordings are recognized as a distinct class of copyrighted works that are themselves deserving of copyright protection. This federal protection only applies to sound recordings “fixed” on or after February 15, 1972.
  • Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings Act

    The Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings Act (DPRSRA) is enacted, which grants the exclusive right of reproducing phonorecords extends to the transmission of digital files.
  • Copyright Royalty and Distribution Reform Act

    Congress passes the Copyright Royalty and Distribution Reform Act of 2004, which calls for the creation of the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB). The CRB is the administrative body responsible for establishing statutory rates and terms under the section 115 license. Voluntary licenses between copyright owners and users are also allowed, but the rate acts set by the CRB are a ceiling for what the owners may charge.
  • Section 115 Reform Act

    The Section 115 Reform Act (SIRA) is introduced but not passed. SIRA would have established a blanket mechanical license for digital services.