Solar Flares

Timeline created by mcpkid@gmail.com
  • A "flash of lightning" is Spotted by Steven Gray

    A "flash of lightning" is Spotted by Steven Gray
    Stephen Gray saw a “flash of lightning” near a sunspot. It would later be found in his unpublished notebook and be known as a white light flare Carrington, R.C. 1860, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20, p. 13. Lang, K.R. 2000, The Sun from Space, Springer, chap. 6 "Solar flare." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Science in Context. Web. 12 Dec. 2013.
  • Richard Christopher Carrington is Born.

    Richard Christopher Carrington is Born.
    Carring discovered solar flares and he was originally a theologist. "Richard Christopher Carrington (1826–1875)." High Altitude Observatory. HAO, n.d. Web. 12 Dec. 2013. http://www.hao.ucar.edu/education/bios/carrington.php. Porter, R. (ed.) 1994, The Biographical Dictionary of Scientists, Oxford University Press.
  • Schwabe's Observances are Published

    Schwabe's Observances are Published
    A book of Heinrich Schwabe’s sunspot observances was published in 1850. This is what prompted Carrington’s interests in the sun. Merrell, Trevor. "The Discovery of Solar Flares." N.p., Spring 2002. Web. 12 Dec. 2013. http://holbert.faculty.asu.edu/eee460/ttm/index.html.
  • Discovery of Solar Flares

    Discovery of Solar Flares
    English astronomer Richard Carrington recorded the first solar flare observation in 1859. This was seen as an especially white light by accident while watching for sunspots. "Solar Flare." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Vol. 5. Detroit: Gale, 2008. 3997-3998. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 10 Dec. 2013. "Solar flare." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Science
  • Solar-B is Launched

    Solar-B is Launched
    A Japanese spacecraft was launched to investigate on solar flares. A satellite was brought into space by this spacecraft to study the "solar magnetic field." "Spaceflight Now | Breaking News | Solar Observatory Launched to Space by Japanese Rocket." Spaceflight Now | Breaking News | Solar Observatory Launched to Space by Jap "Solar flare." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Science in Context. Web. 12 Dec. 2013.
  • STEREO is Launched

    STEREO is Launched
    NASA’s twin STEREO spacecraft were launched into space. Using them, scientists created a hypothetical representation to describe coronal mass ejections, which are massive explosions. Gary, Stuart. "New Images Expand Solar Flare Knowledge › News in Science (ABC Science)." News in Science. ABC Science, 9 Nov. 2010. Web. 12 Dec. 2013. http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2010/11/09/3060266.htm.
  • NASA's SDO is Launched

    NASA's SDO is Launched
    Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) found that in 1 in 7 of flares experience an aftershock of ultraviolet radiation 90 minutes after the initial flare. Phillips, Tony. "The Secret Lives of Solar Flares." NASA Science.
    NASA, 1 Oct. 2011. Web. 12 Dec. 2013. Dunbar, Brian. "SDO Celebrates One Year Anniversary." NASA. NASA, 11 Feb. 2011. Web. 12 Dec. 2013.
  • Detection of Positrons

    Detection of Positrons
    The first detection of positrons in solar flares occurred. Positrons are the antiparticles of electrons. They behave exactly the same except that electrons have a negative charge while positrons have a positive charge. "First Discovery Of Positrons In Solar Flares Reported." MessageToEagle.com. N.p., 9 July 2013. Web. 12 Dec. 2013.