Shaping Modern Day K-12 public Education

Timeline created by bflandrick
In History
  • Expansion of English colonization

    Expansion of English colonization
    Expansion of the English brought spread of decisive cultural influence throughout the school system. These ideals influenced those who came to America. School depended on 3 key factors: Local Economy, local Religious practices and views on Government involvement. This gave the start to the school systems in America. (Kaplan, L. S., & Owings, W. A. 2015, P100)
  • End of British Rule

    End of British Rule
    The end of the British Rule, brought an agreement between the nations leaders that public schools were essential in maintaining a form of Government. This means basing school off of American art, History, law, independent thinking, and American culture. This narrowed down the curriculum that was to be taught in American Schools. (Kaplan, L. S., & Owings, W. A. 2015, P118).
  • Standard Curriculum

    Standard Curriculum
    The National Education Association Established a standard curriculum That addressed everything from elementary education to High school education. The standard Curriculum gave a definition to what was to be taught and at what grade. (Kaplan, L. S., & Owings, W. A. 2015, P142).
  • Brown Vs. Board of Education

    Brown Vs. Board of Education
    African American Children of elementary school age had a suit filed on their behalf to able to enroll in a public schools serving white children. This case stated that segregated public schools were not equal and wouldn't be equal, which deprived these children the equal protection of the laws. In an 1954 ruling, the Supreme court agreed and realized segregated facilities provided unequal educational opportunities. (Kaplan, L. S., & Owings, W. A. 2015, P166).
  • American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
    In 2009, president Barack Obama signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment act. This act gave funding to help education in school. Specifically, The money given by this act went to teacher and Principle effectiveness and turning around under performing schools. The outcome of this act was improved student achievement, Narrowed Achievement gap, and increased graduation and college enrollment rates. (Kaplan, L. S., & Owings, W. A. 2015, P166).