Renaissance image

Renaissance Achievements

  • Period: Jan 1, 1350 to

    The Renaissance

  • Jan 1, 1400

    Advancements in Algebra

    Advancements in Algebra
    Islamic methods of abreviation and symbolism are introduced into algebra, developing new ways to solve complex algebraic equations.
  • Jan 1, 1440

    Printing Press

    Printing Press
    Johann Gutenberg developes a moveable-type printing press, revolutionizing the process of mass printing, and making books more accesible to everyone.
  • Jan 1, 1453

    Abacists Teach Math to Merchants

    Abacists Teach Math to Merchants
    Needing to keep track of their money and trades, Italian merchants inspire a new class of mathematicians called abacists, who write the texts from which they teach the necessary mathematics to those wishing to become merchants. These abacists continue teaching for the majority of the fourteenth century.
  • Jan 1, 1484

    French Algebra and Arithmatic

    French Algebra and Arithmatic
    Chuquet, a French physician, wrote, "Triparty en la science des nombres", a work on algebra and arithmetic in three parts, the first detailed French text on the subject. However, it was not printed until 1880 CE.
  • Jan 1, 1486

    "The Birth of Venus"

    "The Birth of Venus"
    Sandro Botticelli completes his masterpiece tempera painting entitled, "The Birth of Venus". This painting depicts the Roman godess Venus emerging from the sea.
  • Jan 1, 1498

    "The Last Supper"

    "The Last Supper"
    Da Vinci finishes his tempera mural entitled,"The Last Supper", depicting Jesus dining with His twelve apostles.
  • Jan 1, 1500

    The First Watch is Created

    The First Watch is Created
    Peter Henlien of Nuremberg, creates the first watch, a small clock that can be carried around in the pocket, running on a coiled spring wound the same way as modern analog clocks.
  • Jan 1, 1502

    "David"

    "David"
    Michaleangelo completes his masterpiece marble sculpture entitled, "David", depicting the Biblical hero David standing nude.
  • Jan 1, 1508

    The Human Body

    The Human Body
    Da Vinci begins a new notebook investigating parts of the human body and how they work, contributing greatly to the understanding of human anatomy.
  • Jan 1, 1510

    The Sistine Chapel Ceiling

    The Sistine Chapel Ceiling
    Michelangelo completes the painting of the Sistine Chapel ceiling. This work depicts many human figures in many variationns, such as body positions, clothing, and facial expression. Michelangelo's work proved his great skill as an artist, even though he was painting while lying on his back.
  • Jan 1, 1513

    "Mona Lisa"

    "Mona Lisa"
    Leonardo da Vinci completes his oil painting of a woman entitled, "Mona Lisa".
  • Jan 1, 1543

    The Solar System

    The Solar System
    Copernicus writes a work that places the sun at the center of the universe and the planets in semi-correct order around it, creating a semi-correct map of the solar system.
  • Jan 1, 1543

    Niccolo Fontana Tartaglia

    Niccolo Fontana Tartaglia
    Niccolo Fontana Tartaglia publishes a Latin translation, the first printed edition, of Euclid's Elements, a mathematical textbook originally printed in 300 BCE.
  • Jan 1, 1543

    The Subject of Anatomy

    The Subject of Anatomy
    Andreas Vesalius, a Flemish doctor, publishes 'De Humani Corporis Fabrica'. This book is based largely on human dissection, and transformes anatomy into a subject that relies on observations taken directly from human dissections.
  • Jan 1, 1550

    World's First Calculus Text

    World's First Calculus Text
    Jyesthadeva, a mathemtician and astronomer, writes the world's first calculus text.
  • Jan 1, 1581

    The Pendulum

    The Pendulum
    Galileo discovers the pendulum and invents a clock that uses the pendulum to keep the movement of the hands or bell of the clock at a constant speed. The average error with the pendulum varies only by seconds each day. Before the penduulum, this error varried from 10 to 15 minutes a day.
  • The First Microscope

    The First Microscope
    Two Dutch spectacle makers, Zaccharias Janssen and his son Hans, while experimenting with several lenses in a tube, discover that nearby objects appear greatly enlarged. This is the birth of the microscope, and later inspires the creation of the telescope.
  • Magnetism

    Magnetism
    'De Magnete' is published by William Gilbert and is quickly accepted as the standard work on electrical and magnetic properties throughout Europe. In it, Gilbert distinguishes between magnetism and static, and developes an entire magnetic philosophy.
  • The First Telescope

    The First Telescope
    The first telescope is invented in the Netherlands, as a way to see objects far away.This telescope consists of a convex and a concave lens inside a tube. In the year 1609, Galileo refines the design of the telescope, inceasing the magnifying power, eventually able to see as far as the stars and planets.
  • Circulating Blood

    Circulating Blood
    Scientist William Harvey propses a theory about the role of heart in circulating blood through the body and to the vital organs. In order to enhance and support his theory, Harvey studies the functions of the blood and heart in live animals. Harvey publishes his first findings in a book called ‘An Anatomical Study of the Motion of the Heart and of the Blood in Animals’.