Protest song "80" "90"

Timeline created by Ayoub Merabet
In Music
  • "Biko," by Peter Gabriel

    "Biko," by Peter Gabriel
    Released in 1980. The song was included on Gabriel's third album, Peter Gabriel. It is about Steve Biko, a noted black South African anti-apartheid activist. Biko had been arrested by the South African police in late August 1977.
  • "My Country I & II," by Roger Taylor

    "My Country I & II," by Roger Taylor
    From the 1982 solo album of Queen's drummer, the song attacks wars based on the agendas of ageing politicians, as well as stabbing at politics in general.
  • "You're In The Army Now," by Bolland

    "You're In The Army Now," by Bolland
    This song from 1981 is a anti-Vietnam song. Original made by Bolland (two Dutch brothers who also produced "Rock me Amadeus" by Falco. It was later covered by Status Quo (and they made it a hit). "A vacation in a foreign land, Uncle Sam does the best he can". "Now you remember what the draftman said, nothing to do all day but stay in bed".
  • "Brothers In Arms," by Dire Straits

    "Brothers In Arms," by Dire Straits
    Released during the Falklands War and promptly banned by the B.B.C. in the U.K. It's a song about the utter folly of going to wa
  • a"Forgotten Sons," by Marillion

    a"Forgotten Sons," by Marillion
    A Song over the Civil-War in North Ireland. Released in 1983.
  • "Peace in Our Time," by Elvis Costello & the Attractions

    "Peace in Our Time," by Elvis Costello & the Attractions
    Sums up the political mood of 1984 quite perfectly. I especially love the line: "We already have one spaceman in the White House, whatcha want another one for?"
  • "Help Save The Youth Of America," by Billy Bragg

    "Help Save The Youth Of America," by Billy Bragg
    Though writen in 1985, it rings surprisingly true 20 years later. "Listen to the voice of the soldier, down in the killing zone, talkin' 'bout the cost of living, and the price of briniging him home"
  • "Flowers of Guatemala," by R.E.M

    "Flowers of Guatemala," by R.E.M
    This song, from 1986, was on R.E.M.'s "Life's Rich Pageant" album and is about the violent right-wing govt in Guatemala and the devastating effect it had on the Guatemalan people.
  • "Violence is Golden," by John Fogerty

    "Violence is Golden," by John Fogerty
    Released in 1986, another song about war and its consequences.
  • "Finest Worksong," by R.E.M.

    "Finest Worksong," by R.E.M.
    The opener from 1987's Document, this song can be interpreted as call to arms against the status quo, generally, and American-style consumerism (which was at a nadir in 1987) particularly. "Take your instinct by the reins Your better best to rearrange What we want and what we need Has been confused, been confused" That's a terrific opening verse for an album that generally rejects Reagan's pure capitalism and its fallout at every turn.
  • NWA Fuck The Police

    NWA Fuck The Police
    The lyrics are aimed violently at the police, in the context of tensions between young African-Americans and the police. The FBI, given the words, will issue a warning to the Compton group. Ironically, this will participate in the legend of N.W.A, which therefore presents itself as the "most dangerous group in the world"
  • "Hideous Towns," by The Sundays

    "Hideous Towns," by The Sundays
    Borderline '80s (1989/1990) this song is a protest against people being drafted into the military.
  • "One Man One Vote," by Johnny Clegg & Savuka

    "One Man One Vote," by Johnny Clegg & Savuka
    Anti-apartheid song written in 1989
  • "Please Forgive Us," by 10,000 Maniacs

    "Please Forgive Us," by 10,000 Maniacs
    This terrific song from 1989 protests American involvement in Central America and our penchant for propping up dictatorial governments (El Salvador, Panama, Nicaragua, Guatemala).
  • "Belfast Child," by Simple Minds

    "Belfast Child," by Simple Minds
    Fantastic song about the Irish war, 1989, n°1 in UK in February.
  • "VX Gas Attack," by Skinny Puppy

    "VX Gas Attack," by Skinny Puppy
    Protests the United State's support of Saddam Hussein (Released in 1989)
  • Stop the Violence Movement

    Stop the Violence Movement
    Self Destruction is the only single by "The Stop The Violence Movement" formed by rapper KRS-One in 1988 in response to violence in the hip hop and African American communities.
    The single raised over $100,000 and it was donated to the National Urban League
  • Public Enemy (" Fight the Power "[1989])

    Public Enemy (" Fight the Power "[1989])
    Who vehemently protested the discrimination and poverty which the black community faced in the U.S., in particular focusing on police discrimination.