History of Multicultural Education

Timeline created by helen3lee
In History
  • University of Iowa as the first state university to admit men and women equally

    University of Iowa as the first state university to admit men and women equally
    In the United States, the University of Iowa became the first state university to accept male and female students equally. This contributed to multicultural education by being one of the first steps to promote equality, regardless of a person's sex, in higher education.
  • Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka
    Brown v. Board was a case in which the U.S Supreme Court declared that segregation in educational institutions was unequal. This outcome marked the beginning of multicultural education. Although it did not generate immediate reform, it enabled education to start desegregating and providing equally to students from all races and ethnicity. This helped enrich education with more diversity in schools.
  • Civil Rights Act of 1964

    Civil Rights Act of 1964
    In the United States, the Civil Rights Act became a law that prohibited discrimination based on race, skin color, sex, religion, or natural origin. The Civil Rights Act helped multicultural education by stopping schools from denying equal education to people of different groups and genders. This contributed to the educational reforms that developed multicultural education into what it is today.
  • President Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty

    President Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty
    U.S President Lyndon B. Johnson established the program "War on Poverty," which helped low-income students. It provided funds, aid, scholarships, loans, and programs such as Project Head Start so that students from low-income families could receive the same education richer students. Multicultural education addresses students form different socioeconomic standings and their different ways of learning. Thus, War of Poverty contributed to multicultural education by aiding low-income students.
  • The Equality of Educational Opportunity Study

    The Equality of Educational Opportunity Study
    The Equality of Education Opportunity Study helped promote multicultural education. By showing how integrated schools benefit African American children, the study validated the outcomes of educating African American students with the same resources that white students use. This study motivated more schools to become more integrated and diverse.
  • Diana v. California State Board of Education

    Diana v. California State Board of Education
    The case of Diana v. California State Board of Education was a case for equal rights for students whose native language is not English. The outcome produced new laws, in which children can receive tests in their primary language, rather than being tested with English exams and be assigned as Educable Mentally Retarded (EMR) because of their test results. Since different languages and bilingualism is mart of multicultural education, this case contributes to the language aspect of diversity.
  • Marland Report to Congress

    Marland Report to Congress
    The Marland Report to Congress suggested a broader definition for gifted students and special needs students. Giftedness and special needs is addressed in multicultural education. This broader definition of giftedness helped redefine the direction of multicultural education.
  • Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972
    Title IX prohibited discrimination based on sex in school. This benefited multicultural education in the terms of gender. Now women could benefit with more equal education and feel safe when learning.
  • Emergency Immigrant Education Act

    Emergency Immigrant Education Act
    Schools needed resources to accommodate immigrant students. The Emergency Immigrant Education Act provided resources and funding to schools that were receiving immigrants. The act enabled schools to provide a fair education to students regardless of their national origins and their status as citizen, resident, immigrant.
  • Public Law 101-476, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA),

    Public Law 101-476, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA),
    This act changed terminology regarding disabled people and added autistic people and people with traumatic brain injury into this list of individuals eligible for transition services. This act was beneficial in developing multicultural education. Helping students who have different thinking behaviors is a step towards multicultural education.