Ilustracion de periodos geologicos en los estratos de roca de la tierra t953we

GEOLOGICAL TIME

  • Period: 541 BCE to 252 BCE

    Paleozoic era

    The Paleozoic Era began 541 million years ago and ended about 252 million years ago. In other words, its duration was approximately 290 million years. It ranges from the appearance of animals with shells or exoskeletons, to the emergence of the first amphibians and reptiles.
  • Period: 541 BCE to 485 BCE

    Cambrian period

    The Cambrian period, part of the Paleozoic era, produced the most intense burst of evolution ever known. The Cambrian Explosion saw an incredible diversity of life emerge, including many major animal groups alive today. Among them were the chordates, to which vertebrates (animals with backbones) such as humans belong.
  • 510 BCE

    Cambrian period

    Cambrian period
  • Period: 485 BCE to 444 BCE

    Ordovician period

    During the Ordovician period, part of the Paleozoic era, a rich variety of marine life flourished in the vast seas and the first primitive plants began to appear on land—before the second largest mass extinction of all time ended the period.
  • 450 BCE

    Ordovician period

    Ordovician period
  • Period: 444 BCE to 419 BCE

    Silurian period

    The Silurian Period occurred from 443 million to 416 million years ago. ... It followed the Ordovician Period and preceded the Devonian Period. During this time, continental landmasses were low and sea levels were rising. This meant rich shallow sea ecosystems with new ecological niches.
  • Period: 419 BCE to 359 BCE

    Devonian period

    The Devonian, part of the Paleozoic era, is otherwise known as the Age of Fishes, as it spawned a remarkable variety of fish. The most formidable of them were the armored placoderms, a group that first appeared during the Silurian with powerful jaws lined with bladelike plates that acted as teeth.
  • 400 BCE

    Silurian period

    Silurian period
  • 370 BCE

    Devonion period

    Devonion period
  • Period: 359 BCE to 299 BCE

    Carboniferous period

    The later half of the period experienced glaciations, low sea level, and mountain building as the continents collided to form Pangaea. A minor marine and terrestrial extinction event, the Carboniferous rainforest collapse, occurred at the end of the period, caused by climate change.
  • 320 BCE

    Carboniferous period

    Carboniferous period
  • Period: 299 BCE to 259 BCE

    Permian period

    During the Permian Period, Earth's crustal plates formed a single, massive continent called Pangaea. In the correspondingly large ocean, Panthalassa, marine organisms such as brachiopods, gastropods, cephalopods (nautiloids and ammonoids), and crinoids were present. On land, reptiles replaced amphibians in abundance.
  • 275 BCE

    Permian period

    Permian period
  • Period: 252 BCE to 66 BCE

    Mesozoic era

    The Mesozoic era is divided into three periods: Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous. Flowering plants and new types of insects proliferate. More modern teleost fish are beginning to appear. Ammonites, belemnites, rudist bivalves, echinoids, and sponges are common.
  • Period: 252 BCE to 201 BCE

    Triassic period

    During the Triassic, the first dinosaurs walked on the land, the first pterosaurs sailed through the skies, and the first ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs swam in the oceans. The lineage of many modern-day reptiles began in the Triassic Period, including crocodiles, lizards, and turtles
  • 230 BCE

    Triassic period

    Triassic period
  • Period: 201 BCE to 145 BCE

    Jurassic Period

    This period is characterized by the hegemony of the great dinosaurs and by the split of Pangea into the Laurasia and Gondwana continents. From the latter Australia was split off (in the Upper Jurassic and early Cretaceous), just as Laurasia split into North America and Eurasia.
  • 175 BCE

    Jurassic period

    Jurassic period
  • Period: 145 BCE to 66 BCE

    Cretaceous period

    During this period, oceans formed as land shifted and broke out of one big supercontinent into smaller ones. Continents were on the move in the Cretaceous, busy remodeling the shape and tone of life on Earth.
  • 100 BCE

    Cretaceous period

    Cretaceous period
  • Period: 66 BCE to 20

    Cenozoic era

    The Mesozoic era is divided into three periods: Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous. Flowering plants and new types of insects proliferate. More modern teleost fish are beginning to appear. Ammonites, belemnites, rudist bivalves, echinoids, and sponges are common.
  • Period: 66 BCE to 2 BCE

    Tertiary period

    This period began 65 million years ago and ended roughly 1.8 million years ago and bore witness to some major geological, biological and climatological events. This included the current configuration of the continents, the cooling of global temperatures, and the rise of mammals as the planet's dominant vertebrates.
  • 55 BCE

    Tertiary period

    Tertiary period
  • Period: 2 BCE to 50

    Quaternary period

    The Quaternary Period is famous for the many cycles of glacial growth and retreat, the extinction of many species of large mammals and birds, and the spread of humans. The Quaternary Period is divided into two epochs, from youngest to oldest: the Holocene and Pleistocene.
  • 20

    Quaternary period

    Quaternary period