The Evolution of Traditional to New Media

  • 2500 BCE

    Papyrus in Egypt

    Papyrus in Egypt
    The papyrus plant is a reed that grows in marshy areas around the Nile river. In ancient Egypt, the wild plant was used for a variety of uses, and specially cultivated papyrus, grown on plantations, was used to make the writing material. The inside of the triangular stalk was cut or peeled into long strips.
  • 2400 BCE

    Clay Tablets

    Clay Tablets
    In the Ancient Near East, clay tablets (Akkadian ṭuppu(m) were used as a writing medium, especially for writing in cuneiform, throughout the Bronze Age and well into the Iron Age. Cuneiform characters were imprinted on a wet clay tablet with a stylus often made of reed (reed pen).
  • 1700 BCE

    PRE-INDUSTRIAL AGE

    PRE-INDUSTRIAL AGE
    People discover fire, developed paper from plants, and forge weapon and tools with stone, bronze, copper, and iron.
  • 200 BCE

    Dibao in China

    Dibao in China
    The Chinese “Dibao” is the earliest and oldest newspaper in the world. During West Han time, Han government carried out the “Jun xian zhi” 郡县制, the eparch and county system which is helpful in concentrating the central power.
  • 130 BCE

    Acta Diurna

    Acta Diurna
    were daily Roman official notices, a sort of daily gazette. They were carved on stone or metal and presented in message boards in public places like the Forum of Rome.
  • 228

    Printing Press using woodblocks

    Printing Press using woodblocks
    Woodblock printing is a technique for printing text, images or patterns used widely throughout East Asia and originating in China in antiquity as a method of printing on textiles and later paper.
  • 500

    Codex in Mayan Region

    Codex in Mayan Region
    Maya codices (singular codex) are folding books written by the pre-Columbian Maya civilization in Maya hieroglyphic script on Mesoamerican bark cloth. The folding books are the products of professional scribes working under the patronage of deities such as the Tonsured Maize God and the Howler Monkey Gods. Most of the codices were destroyed by conquistadors and Catholic priests in the 16th century.
  • Newspaper (The London Gazette)

    Newspaper (The London Gazette)
    The London Gazette is one of the official journals of record of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published.
  • INDUSTRIAL AGE (1700s TO 1930S)

    INDUSTRIAL AGE (1700s TO 1930S)
    is a period of history that encompasses the changes in economic and social organization that began around 1760 in Great Britain and later in other countries, characterized chiefly by the replacement of hand tools with power-driven machines such as the power loom and the steam engine, and by the concentration of industry in large establishments
  • Typewriter

    Typewriter
    typewriting machines first appeared in the early 1800s, but enjoyed little commercial success until the Remington Arms Company (USA) marketed in 1874 a design bought from Sholes. The typewriter wrought a major change in the business environment: No longer was it necessary to write a fine copperplate hand to have a career in business: Documents could be produced more quickly and legibly by the machine
  • Telegraph

    Telegraph
    Developed in the 1830s and 1840s by Samuel Morse (1791-1872) and other inventors, the telegraph revolutionized long-distance communication. It worked by transmitting electrical signals over a wire laid between stations. In addition to helping invent the telegraph, Samuel Morse developed a code (bearing his name) that assigned a set of dots and dashes to each letter of the English alphabet and allowed for the simple transmission of complex messages across telegraph lines.
  • Printing Press for Mass Production

    Printing Press for Mass Production
    Johannes Gutenberg is usually cited as the inventor of the printing press. Indeed, the German goldsmith's 15th-century contribution to the technology was revolutionary — enabling the mass production of books and the rapid dissemination of knowledge throughout Europe. However, the history of printing begins long before Gutenberg's time.
  • Motion Picture Photography Projection

    Motion Picture Photography Projection
    The motion picture is a remarkably effective medium in conveying drama and especially in the evocation of emotion. The art of motion pictures is exceedingly complex, requiring contributions from nearly all the other arts as well as countless technical skills (for example, in sound recording, photography, and optics). Emerging at the end of the 19th century, this new art form became one of the most popular and influential media of the 20th century and beyond.
  • Commercial Motion Picture

    Commercial Motion Picture
    Motion picture photography as a professional industry has many facets. In effect, this is a compendium. Subjects pertaining more closely to imaging are covered in greater detail than others not directly involving imaging. For definitions of many terms used here, consult the glossary. Motion picture photography, dating from the 1890s, is one of the oldest of modern imaging, technologies that remains current today.
  • Motion Picture with Sound

    Motion Picture with Sound
    A sound film is a motion picture with synchronized sound, or sound technologically coupled to image, as opposed to a silent film. The first known public exhibition of projected sound films took place in Paris in 1900, but decades passed before sound motion pictures were made commercially practical. Reliable synchronization was difficult to achieve with the early sound-on-disc systems, and amplification and recording quality were also inadequate.
  • ELECTRONIC AGE

    ELECTRONIC AGE
    The Information Age (also known as the Computer Age, Digital Age, or New Media Age) is a historic period in the 21st century characterized by the rapid shift from traditional industry that the Industrial Revolution brought through industrialization, to an economy based on information technology.
  • Televison

    Televison
    The First Electronic Television was Invented in 1927. The world's first electronic television was created by a 21 year old inventor named Philo Taylor Farnsworth. That inventor lived in a house without electricity until he was age 14.
  • Large Economic Computers

    Large Economic Computers
    he earliest electronic general-purpose computers made. It was Turing-complete, digital and able to solve "a large class of numerical problems" through reprogramming.
  • Transistor Radio

    Transistor Radio
    A transistor radio is a small portable radio receiver that uses transistor-based circuitry. Following their development in 1954, made possible by the invention of the transistor in 1947, they became the most popular electronic communication device in history, with billions manufactured during the 1960s and 1970s.
  • Mainframe Computers

    Mainframe Computers
    are computers used primarily by large organizations for critical applications; bulk data processing, such as census, industry and consumer statistics, enterprise resource planning; and transaction processing. They are larger and have more processing power than some other classes of computers: minicomputers, servers, workstations, and personal computers.
  • LCD Projector

    LCD Projector
    An LCD projector is a type of video projector for displaying video, images or computer data on a screen or other flat surface. It is a modern equivalent of the slide projector or overhead projector.
  • NEW AGE

    NEW AGE
    is a historic period in the 21st century characterized by the rapid shift from traditional industry that the Industrial Revolution brought through industrialization, to an economy based on information technology.
  • Web Browser: Mosaic

    Web Browser: Mosaic
    NCSA Mosaic, or simply Mosaic, is the web browser that popularized the World Wide Web and the Internet. It was also a client for earlier internet protocols such as File Transfer Protocol, Network News Transfer Protocol, and Gopher. The browser was named for its support of multiple internet protocols.
  • Internet Explorer

    Internet Explorer
    Internet Explorer[a] (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer and Windows Internet Explorer, commonly abbreviated IE or MSIE) is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included in the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems, starting in 1995. It was first released as part of the add-on package Plus! for Windows 95 that year.
  • Blogspot

    Blogspot
    Pyra Labs launched a program called “Blogspot” in 1999 that would let people run their own blogs. The program was bought by Google in 2003, and changed to Blogger in 2006.What is most interesting about this tidbit will be that I don’t mention it in the Podcast. It was brought to my attention after the weekend recordings were made. Nonetheless, it is what brought us to a Social Network world of today and needed to be talked about.
  • Friendster

    Friendster
    WordPress is a free and open-source content management system (CMS) based on PHP and MySQL.[4] Features include a plugin architecture and a template system. It is most associated with blogging, but supports other types of web content including more traditional mailing lists and forums, media galleries, and online stores.
  • Skype

    Skype
    Skype was founded in 2003 by Niklas Zennström, from Sweden, and Janus Friis, from Denmark. The Skype software was created by Estonians Ahti Heinla, Priit Kasesalu, and Jaan Tallinn. The first public beta version was released on 29 August 2003.
  • Facbook

    Facbook
    Facebook is an American online social media and social networking service company based in Menlo Park, California. Its website was launched on February 4, 2004, by Mark Zuckerberg, along with fellow Harvard College students and roommates Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, and Chris Hughes.
  • Youtube

    Youtube
    YouTube is an American video-sharing website headquartered in San Bruno, California. The service was created by three former PayPal employees—Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim—in February 2005. Google bought the site in November 2006 for US$1.65 billion; YouTube now operates as one of Google's subsidiaries.
  • Twitter

    Twitter
    Twitter (/ˈtwɪtər/) is an online news and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets". Tweets were originally restricted to 140 characters, but on November 7, 2017, this limit was doubled for all languages except Japanese, Korean, and Chinese.
  • Cave Paintings

    Cave Paintings
    these are painted drawing on the wall of a cave walls or ceiling, often depicting animals. And the exact purpose of the Paleolithic paintings or cave paintings is not known.