C.W. Ruth age 10-19

  • Period: to

    Christian Wismer Ruth - events age 10-19

  • 1st newspaper cartoon strip, "Professor Tigwissel’s Burglar Alarm" appeared in the New York "Daily Graphics" newspaper

  • Sons of American Revolution was organized

  • Tchaikovsky’s 1st Piano Concerto premiered in Boston

  • Dental mallet to impact gold into cavities was patented

    William Bonwill
  • Jack London was born

    Wrote "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang."
  • Bat Masterson legendary gunfight in Sweetwater, Texas

  • National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs was formed in New York

    Eight teams: Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Hartford, Louisville, New York, Philadelphia, St Louis
  • Al Spalding opened a sporting good shop

  • A direct telegraph link was established between Britain & New Zealand

  • President Rutherford B. Hayes

    Innagurated
  • Alexander Graham Bell made what was, in effect, the first telephone call

  • The first official NL baseball game took place

    Boston beat Philadelphia 6-5
  • Tchaikovsky completed his "Swan Lake" ballet

  • Centennial Fair opened in Philadelphia

    Centennial Exhibition was a world’s fair celebrating the founding of the US and drew over 9.9 million people. The US population at this time was 46 million
  • Bananas became popular in US following the Centennial Exposition in Phila

  • Annie Oakley, sharpshooter, married Frank Butler, marksman

  • Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated his telephone at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia

  • Battle of Little Big Horn

  • Electric lights were introduced on Market Street in SF

  • US Coast Guard officers' training school was established

    New Bedford, MA.
  • Colorado was admitted as the 38th state

  • Frontiersman Wild Bill Hickok was shot and killed while playing poker at a saloon in Deadwood, S.D

  • Thomas A. Edison received a patent for his mimeograph

  • A race riot took place in Charleston, SC

  • 1st carpet sweeper was patented by Melville Bissell of Grand Rapids, Mich.

  • President Grant sent federal troops to SC

  • 1st US crematorium began operation in Washington, Penn

  • Hannah Omish (12) was the youngest person ever hanged in US

  • Cornelius Vanderbilt (b.1794), US financier, railroad and shipping magnate, robber baron, died

    His estate at $105 million was worth more than all the money in the US Treasury. His value in 2007 dollars would be $143 billion
  • 1st news dispatch by telephone was made between Boston and Salem, Mass

  • In Philadelphia the first department store, The Grand Depot, opened. John Wanamaker turned an abandoned railway depot into one of the world’s 1st department stores

  • Federal troops were withdrawn from Columbia, SC

  • 1st human cannonball act was performed in London

  • The catcher's mask was first used in a baseball game

  • First National League baseball game was played

  • Federal troops were ordered out of New Orleans, ending the North's post-Civil War rule in the South

  • Russia declared war on the Ottoman Empire

  • President Hayes ordered the withdrawal all Federal troops from the South, ending Reconstruction

  • Chief Crazy Horse surrendered to U.S. troops in Nebraska

  • U.S. troops were authorized to pursue bandits into Mexico

  • The Nez Perce War began in the northwestern US

  • Great Railroad Strike of 1877 began in Martinsburg, West Virginia, and ended some 45 days later after it was put down by local and state militias

  • Thomas Edison recorded the human voice for the first time

  • Brigham Young died

  • Pancho Villa was born

  • Edward S. Morse gave the first lecture on evolution in Japan

  • Brigadier General Alfred Terry met with Sitting Bull in Canada to discuss the Indians' return to the United States

  • Russians launched a surprise night attack that overran Turkish forces at Kars, Armenia

  • Inventor Thomas A. Edison announced the invention of his phonograph

  • Washington Post published its 1st edition

  • Pres. and Mrs. Hayes celebrated their silver anniversary by re-enacting their wedding ceremony in the White House

  • US Supreme court ruled that race separation on trains was unconstitutional

  • The 1st telephone exchange was established at New Haven, Conn

  • The silver dollar became US legal tender

  • Lincoln County War began

  • first telephone directory was issued, by the District Telephone Company of New Haven (New Harbor), Conn

  • Russia and the Ottomans signed the Treaty of San Stefano, granting independence to Serbia

  • Thomas Fisher, an alleged member of the Molly McGuires, was hung at the Carbon County Prison of Mauch Chunk, Pa

  • The 1st large-scale Easter Monday egg roll was held on White House lawn under President Rutherford B. Hayes and his wife Lucy

  • Lionel Barrymore was born

  • The first American bicycle race was held in Boston

  • Gilbert & Sullivan’s opera "HMS Pinafore" premiered in London

  • Turkey turned Cyprus over to the British

  • John Wise flew the first dirigible in Lancaster, Pennsylvania

  • Yellow Fever epidemic began in New Orleans. It killed 4,500

  • American Bar Association was founded in Saratoga, N.Y

  • Emma M. Nutt became the first female telephone operator in the United States

  • Edison made electricity available for household usage

  • Edward Scripps (1854-1926) and John Scripps Sweeney founded the Penny Press

  • New Mexico Governor Lew Wallace offered amnesty to many participants of the Lincoln County War, but not to gunfighter Billy the Kid.

  • The 1st US store to install electric lights was in Philadelphia

  • The Zulu war against British colonial rule in South Africa began

  • Joseph Swan demonstrated a light bulb using carbon glow

  • 1st artificial ice rink in North America was at Madison Square Garden, NYC

  • President Hayes signed a bill allowing female attorneys to argue cases before the Supreme Court

  • Congress passed the 1st Timberland Protection Act

  • Constantine Fahlberg discovered saccharin, an artificial sweetener

  • Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood became the first woman to be admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court

  • New England Telephone and Bell Telephone merged to become the National Bell Telephone Co

  • Milk was sold in glass bottles for the 1st time

  • W.C. Fields (Claude William Dukinfield) was born

  • Saint Bernadette, who had described seeing visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes, died in Nevers, France

  • New York’s Madison Square Garden opened its doors

  • Gilbert & Sullivan's "HMS Pinafore" debuted at Bowery Theater in NYC

  • The first ship to use electric lights departed from San Francisco, California

  • Richard Rhodes invented a hearing aid called the Audiophone

  • A dual alliance was formed between Austria and Germany, in which the two countries agreed to come to the other’s aid in the event of aggression

  • Thomas Edison demonstrated the electric light

  • Leon Trotsky was born

  • Virgil Earp became a Deputy U.S. Marshall

  • Wyatt Earp arrived in Tombstone, AZ

  • Cezanne, French painter, painted his Self-Portrait

  • Thomas Edison first publicly demonstrated his electric incandescent light in Menlo Park, N.J. and took out a patent

  • 1st US sewage disposal system, separate from storm drains, was established in Memphis

  • Douglas MacArthur (d.1964), U.S. general in World War I, was born

  • Thomas Edison received a patent for his electric incandescent lamp

  • Tsar Alexander II of Russia survived an assassination attempt

  • The Salvation Army arrived in the United States from England.

  • John Stevens of Neenah, Wis., patented the grain crushing mill. This mill allowed flour production to increase by 70 percent

  • Wabash, Ind., became the first town completely illuminated by electrical lighting

  • William Gladstone became Prime Minister of England

  • National Bell reached a settlement with Western Union and became the American Bell Telephone Co

  • The Times war correspondent telephoned a report of the battle of Ahmed Khel, the first time news was sent from a field of battle in this manner

  • The first pay telephone was installed in the Yale Bank Building in New Haven, Conn

  • U.S. census stood at 50,155,783

  • Myra Maybelle Shirley married Sam Starr even though records show she was already married to Bruce Younger

  • Helen Adams Keller was born

  • France annexed Tahiti

  • 1st commercial hydroelectric power planet began in Grand Rapids, Mich

  • Henry Draper took the 1st photograph of the Orion Nebula

  • John Philip Sousa became the new director of US Marine Corps Band

  • First ball-point pen was patented on this day by Alonzo T. Cross

  • The first cash register was patented by James and John Ritty of Dayton, Ohio

  • Sarah Bernhardt, French actress, made her US debut at NY's Booth Theater

  • George Eastman received an order for photographic dry-plates and together with Henry Strong launched the Eastman Dry Plate Co

  • Rodin created his sculpture "The Thinker."

  • Louis Pasteur (57), French scientist, began an experiment to identify the microbe that causes rabies

  • NY's Broadway was lit by electricity. It later became known as "Great White Way."

  • Feodor M. Dostoevsky (59), Russian novelist (Crime & Punishment), died.

  • Kansas became the first state to prohibit all alcoholic beverages

  • President James A. Garfield

    Innaugarated
  • Barnum & Bailey Circus debuted

  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (b.1807), US poet (Song of Hiawatha), died

  • The first long-distance telephone call was made, between Boston and New York City

  • Billy the Kid was held in Lincoln County Courthouse jail, near Carrizozo N.M. for the shooting of Sheriff William Brady, but escaped and killed two guards

  • Frederick Douglass was appointed recorder of deeds for Washington, D.C

  • Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross

  • Less than four months after his inauguration, James Garfield, the 20th President of the US, was assassinated by Charles J. Guiteau, who wished to be appointed consul to France, at the Washington railroad station

    Garfield lived out the summer with a fractured spine and seemed to be gaining strength until he caught a chill and died on September 19. Guiteau was apprehended at the time of the shooting and, in spite of an insanity defense, was convicted of murder. Chester Alan Arthur became the 21st President. Guiteau was hanged in June 1882
  • In Alabama Tuskegee Institute enrolled 30 students. It was founded by former slave Booker T. Washington as a "normal" school and industrial institute where "colored" people with little or no formal schooling could be trained as teachers and skilled worker

  • Outlaw Billy the Kid (21), (born as Henry McCarty) aka William H. Bonney or Kid Antrim, was shot and killed by Sheriff Pat Garrett in Fort Sumner, New Mexico

  • Sioux Indian leader Sitting Bull, a fugitive since the Battle of the Little Big Horn, surrendered to federal troops

  • The first volume of "The War of the Rebellion," a compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, was published

  • Hatfields of south West Virginia and McCoys of eastern Kentucky re-engaged in a feud that dated back to 1865. Some 100 were wounded or died

  • A hurricane hit Florida and the Carolinas; about 700 died

  • President Chester A. Arthur

    Innaugarted
  • David Houston patented roll film for cameras

  • Boston Symphony Orchestra gave its 1st concert

  • Wyatt Earp, his two brothers and "Doc" Holliday showed up at the OK Corral in Tombstone, Arizona, to disarm the Clanton and McLaury boys, who were in violation of a ban on carrying guns in the city limits:

  • Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday, two participants in Tombstone, Arizona’s, famous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, were jailed as the hearings on what happened in the fight grew near

  • Charles J. Guiteau went on trial for assassinating President Garfield. Guiteau was convicted and hanged the following year

  • American Federation of Labor was founded

  • Virgil, Wyatt and Morgan Earp were exonerated in court for their action in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Ariz

  • German-born illustrator Thomas Nast made his familiar illustration of "Merry Old Santa Claus" in Harper's Weekly

  • Oscar Wilde arrived in New York City and began to tour the US with lectures on the aesthetic movement

  • A.A. [Alan Alexander] Milne, novelist, humorist and journalist who wrote Winnie the Pooh, was born

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt, 32nd President of the United States (1933-1945), was born in Hyde Park, N.Y

  • New York Steam Corp began distributing steam to Manhattan buildings

  • US Congress outlawed polygamy

  • German scientist Robert Koch announced in Berlin that he had discovered the bacillus responsible for tuberculosis

  • Outlaw Jesse James (34) was shot in the back and killed at his home in St. Joseph, Mo., by Robert Ford

  • An anti-Semitic League formed in Prussia

  • Charles R. Darwin (b.1809), English naturalist (Origin of Species), died at Downe, England, at age 73

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson, US poet, philosopher, author, essayist, died

  • Over President Arthur’s veto, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which barred Chinese immigrants from the United States for 10 years. It was amended and passed by Congress on August 3 and was signed by Pres. Arthur

  • Czar Alexander III banned Jews from living in rural Romania

  • Henrik Ibsen's "Ghosts" (Gengangere, 1881) premiered in Chicago

  • The United States formally recognized Korea

  • An electric iron was patented by Henry W. Seely in NYC

  • Charles Guiteau the assassin of President Garfield was hanged in a Washington jail

  • Telegraph Hill Observatory opened in SF

  • Mary Todd Lincoln, the widow of Abraham Lincoln, died of a stroke

  • Belle and Sam Starr were charged with Horse stealing in the Indian territory

  • The first Labor Day was observed in New York City by the Carpenters and Joiners Union

  • Thomas Edison displayed the first practical electrical lighting system. He successfully turned on the lights in a one square mile area of New York City with the world’s 1st electricity generating plant.

  • 1st international conference to promote anti-Semitism met in Dresden, Germany (Congress for Safeguarding of Non-Jewish Interests).

  • Alexander Graham Bell made his historic telephone call to the mayor of Chicago

  • 1st string of Christmas tree lights was created by Thomas Edison

  • "Ladies Home Journal" began publishing

  • Oscar Hammerstein patented the 1st cigar-rolling machine

  • Congress authorized the 1st steel vessels in US navy

  • Karl Marx (64), German political philosopher (Communist Manifesto, Das Kapital), died in London

  • Jan Matzeliger invented the 1st machine to manufacture entire shoes

  • Long-distance telephone service was inaugurated between Chicago and New York

  • "Buffalo Bill" Cody put on his 1st Wild West Show

  • 12 people were trampled to death in New York City when a rumor that the recently opened Brooklyn Bridge was in danger of collapsing triggered a stampede

  • The first baseball game under electric lights was played in Fort Wayne, Indiana

  • Chicago's "El" opened to traffic

  • Tom Thumb (44), famous small person (40"), died of a stroke

  • The Northern Pacific Railway celebrated the completion of its east-west line with a Gold Spike at Gold Creek in central Montana. Guests included Frederick Billings, Ulysses S. Grant, and the family of abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison

  • James Goold Cutler, architect, patented the postal mail chute

  • Orient Express made its 1st run linking Istanbul, Turkey, to Paris by rail

  • Sojourner Truth, former slave and abolitionist, died in Battle Creek, Mich

  • A series of tornadoes left an estimated 800 people dead in 7 US states (Miss, Ala, NC, SC, Tenn., Ky & In).

  • Over 100 suffragists, led by Susan B. Anthony, presented President Chester A. Arthur with a demand that he voice support for female suffrage

  • Mississippi established the first U.S. state college for women

  • John Joseph Montgomery made the first glider flight in Otay, Calif

  • Alaska became a US territory

  • America's 1st roller coaster began operating at Coney Island, NYC. It hit a top speed of 6 mph

  • The Statue of Liberty was presented to the United States in ceremonies at Paris, France.

  • The cornerstone for the Statue of Liberty was laid on Bedloe’s Island in New York Harbor

  • The 1st known photograph of a tornado was made near Howard, SD

  • The Equal Rights Party was formed during a convention of suffragists in San Francisco. The convention nominated Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood of Washington, D.C., for president and Marietta Snow as her running mate.

  • Greenwich was established as universal time meridian of longitude

  • Greenwich was established as universal time meridian of longitude

  • Dr. William W. Grant of Davenport, Iowa, performed what is believed to have been the first appendectomy; the patient was 22-year-old Mary Gartside

  • Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was published and became one of the writer's most famous works

  • The Washington Monument was dedicated

  • The U.S. Post Office began offering special delivery for first-class mail

  • California became the 1st US state to establish a permanent forest commission

  • President Grover Cleveland

    Innaugrated
  • Eastman Film Co. of Rochester, N.Y., manufactured the first commercial motion picture film.

  • The Salvation Army was officially organized in the U.S

  • Texas was the last Confederate state readmitted to the Union

  • Boston Pops Orchestra formed

  • Mormons began an exodus from the United States into Mexico

  • Victor-Marie Hugo (b.1802), French novelist (Les Miserables) and poet, died

  • The French naval ship Isere arrived in NYC with a cargo of wooden crates containing the pieces of the Statue of Liberty

  • French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) successfully tested an anti-rabies vaccine on a boy bitten by an infected dog. Thanks to his vaccine the death rate from rabies dropped to almost zero by 1888.

  • Ulysses S. Grant (b.1822), commander of the Union forces at the end of the Civil War and the 18th president of the United States, died in Mount McGregor, N.Y., at age 63.

  • Leo Daft opened America's first commercially operated electric streetcar, in Baltimore