Path to the American Revolutionary War

Timeline created by katie19
  • French and Indian War ends

    French and Indian War ends
    The French and Indian War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris. Great Britain defeated France. Britain took all of France's North American possessions east of the Mississippi River. Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. Print.
  • Sugar Act

    Sugar Act
    The Sugar Act, also known as the American Revenue Act of 1764, cut the duty on Molasses in half. The act was put into action in order to reduce the temptation to smuggle or to bribe custom officers. The act also levied new duties on imports into America. Even though Grenville had good intentions to bring in more revenue for Britain, the Sugar Act did not produce net revenue for Britain. Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. Print
  • Stamp Act

    Stamp Act
    Parliament passed the Stamp Act, which created revenue stamps to be purchased and affixed to every form of printed matter used in the colonies. The Stamp Act affected all the colonists, and it was the first outright effort by Parliament to place a direct tax specifically on American goods and services. The Sons of Liberty protested the Stamp Act, and it was repealed. Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. Print.
  • Townshend Acts

    Townshend Acts
    http://www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/history/townshend-acts.htmlTownshend Acts, 1767, originated by Charles Townshend and passed by the English Parliament shortly after the repeal of the Stamp Act. They were designed to collect revenue from the colonists in America by putting customs duties on imports of glass, lead, paints, paper, and tea. The colonials, spurred on by the writings of John Dickinson, Samuel Adams, and others, protested against the taxes.
  • Boston Massacre

    Boston Massacre
    In the square outside the Boston customhouse, a group of rowdies began taunting and hurling icicles at the British sentry. His call for help brought reinforcements. The British troops continued to be baited, and finally, a soldier was knocked down. The soldier fired into the crowd along with others, and five people died while eight or more were wounded. Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. Print.
  • Boston Tea Party

    Boston Tea Party
    Under the Tea Act, Britain allowed the East India Company to send its tea directly to America without paying any duties. British tea merchants could thereby undercut the prices charged by their colonial competitors. Boston colonists saw the reduction as a clever ruse to make them accept taxation without consent. So, scores of Patirots disguised as Mohawks boarded three British ships and threw 342 chests of tea overboard.
    Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History.
  • Coercive Acts

    Coercive Acts
    Parliament enacted a cluster of harsh acts in the colonies intended to punish rebellious Boston. The Boston Port Act closed the harbor until the city paid for the lost tea. The Quartering Act directed local authorities to provide lodging for British soldiers. The Massachusetts Government Act made all of the colony's civic officers appointive rather than elective. Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. Print.
  • Continental Congress

    Continental Congress
    The 55 delegates making up the First Contiental Congress assembled in Philadelphia. Their mission was to assert the rights of the colonies and create collective measures to defend them. Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. Print.
  • Lexington and Concord "Shot Heard Around the World"

    Lexington and Concord "Shot Heard Around the World"
    In Concord, Americans fought to stop British advance. The Americans inflicted 14 casualties, and by noon the British had begun a ragged retreat back to Lexington. By nightfall the redcoat survivors were safely back in Boston, having suffered three times as many casualties as the Americans. This was the first true battle of the American Revolutionary War. Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. Print.
  • Bunker Hill

    Bunker Hill
    The Battle of Bunker Hill had two profound effects. First , the high number of British casualties made the English generals more cautious in subsequent encounters with the Contiental Army. Second, the Continental Congress recommended that all able-bodied men enlist in a militia. After the battle, both armies settled in for a 9 month stalemate. Tindall, George Brown., and David E. Shi. America. a Narrative History. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. Print.