Ap4502230131

WWII Timeline Project

  • Japanese Invasion of China

    Japanese Invasion of China
    The Second Sino-Japanese War was the result of a decades long Japanese imperialist policy to dominate China politically and militarily as to secure its vast raw material reserves and other resources. It was the conflict that broke out when China began a full-scale resistance to the expansion of Japanese influence in its territory, in the end working effectively and making Japan surrender.
  • The Rape of Nanking

    The Rape of Nanking
    To break the spirit of Chinese resistance, Japanese General Matsui Iwane ordered that the city of Nanking be destroyed. Japanese troops performed countless atrocities against the civilians. "The Japanese butchered an estimated 150,000 male “war prisoners,” massacred an additional 50,000 male civilians, and raped at least 20,000 women and girls of all ages, many of whom were mutilated or killed in the process" (HISTORY). Shortly after the end of the war, Matsui was found guilty and executed.
  • Germany's Invasion of Poland

    Germany's Invasion of Poland
    The beginning of the second world war. German forces bombard Poland on land and from the air, as Adolf Hitler seeks to regain lost territory, from the effects of the Treaty of Versailles, and ultimately rule Poland.He intended to accomplish this with what was called the blitzkrieg strategy, also known as the lightening war. In addition, from here on out as soon as he invaded countries he would begin to terrorize any non-Aryan people.
  • German Blitzkrieg

    German Blitzkrieg
    German forces first tried out the blitzkrieg in Poland in 1939 before successfully employing the tactic with invasions of Belgium, the Netherlands and France in 1940. Also known as a lightning war, a blitzkrieg is a military tactic designed to create disorganization among enemies through the use of mobile forces and locally concentrated firepower.
  • Operation Barbarossa

    Operation Barbarossa
    Adolf Hitler sent his armies in a massive invasion of the Soviet Union composing of "three great army groups with over three million German soldiers, 150 divisions, and three thousand tanks smashed across the frontier into Soviet territory" (History). In the end, Germany conducted a slow retreat as Soviet attacks threatened to envelop much of their forces in a defeat; and Barbarossa had failed, as Nazi Germany confronted a two-front war that it could not win.
  • Pearl Harbor

    Pearl Harbor
    On December 7, 1941, a Japanese fleet including six aircraft carriers, 24 supporting ships, and a group of submarines performed a surprise aerial attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor on Oahu Island, Hawaii. Unknowingly precipitating the entry of the United States into World War II. Climaxing a decade of worsening relations between the United States and Japan.
  • Wannsee Conference

    Wannsee Conference
    The conference marked a turning point in Nazi policy toward the Jews. At the conference, Nazi officials met to discuss the details of the “Final Solution” of the “Jewish question.” "Various gruesome proposals were discussed, including mass sterilization and deportation to the island of Madagascar. Heydrich proposed simply transporting Jews from every corner Europe to concentration camps in Poland and working them to death." (History).
  • Battle of Midway

    Battle of Midway
    In the Battle of Midway the U.S. destroyed the Japanese Imperial Navy, giving them complete control over the Pacific Ocean. As well as resulting in the Japanese loss of four Fleet Aircraft Carriers, along with a small escort of destroyers and cruisers. Not only did this give the American war efforts a great push towards winning the Pacific Theater war, it vastly improved American morale at home.
  • Operation Gomorrah

    Operation Gomorrah
    British bombers raid Hamburg, Germany, by night in Operation Gomorrah, while Americans bomb it by day in its own “Blitz Week.” In retaliation to the deaths of 167 civilians as a result of German bombing raids in July, British aircraft dropped 2,300 tons of incendiary bombs on Hamburg in just a few hours; killing more than 1,500 German civilians in the first British raid.
  • Battle of Stalingrad

    Battle of Stalingrad
    Known as one of the largest, longest, and bloodiest engagements in modern warfare, the Battle of Stalingrad ultimately turned the tide of war in favor of the Allied forces. The battle consisted of Nazi Germany and its Allies fighting the Soviet Union for control of the city of Stalingrad and marked the end of Germany's advances into eastern Europe and Russia. In the end, the Soviets were able to win the Battle of Stalingrad destroying a Germany army group 250,000.
  • Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

    Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
    In 1943, the people of the Jewish ghetto in Nazi-occupied Warsaw, Poland, held an armed revolt to prevent deportations to Nazi concentration camps. 2 months later, some 265,000 Jews had been deported from the Warsaw ghetto to the Treblinka extermination camp, while some 20,000 others were sent to forced-labor camps or killed during the deportation process. Still, the Warsaw Uprising inspired many other revolts in extermination camps throughout the ghettos of German-occupied Eastern Europe.
  • D-Day (Normandy Invasion)

    D-Day (Normandy Invasion)
    The Battle of Normandy, also named Operation Overlord and D-Day, resulted in the Allied liberation of Western Europe from Nazi Germany’s control. On June 6, 1944, 156,000 American, British and Canadian forces landed on five beaches along a 50-mile stretch of the heavily fortified coast of France’s Normandy region. Within 3 months, the northern France would be freed and the invasion force would be preparing to enter Germany, where they would meet up with Soviet forces moving in from the east.
  • Battle of the Bulge

    Battle of the Bulge
    Adolph Hitler attempted to split the Allied armies in northwest Europe by performing a surprise blitzkrieg thrust through the Ardennes to Antwerp. "As the Germans drove deeper into the Ardennes in an attempt to secure vital bridgeheads, the Allied line took on the appearance of a large bulge, giving rise to the battle’s name" (History). Germany's shortage of fuel and the gallantry of American troops in the frozen forests proved fatal to Hitler’s plan.
  • Operation Thunderclap

    Operation Thunderclap
    This plan involved a massive Allied, with heavy reliance on Soviet advance, attack on German Berlin that would supposedly result around 100,000-200,000 deaths, with many of them being influential German personnel. The plan held high hopes of shattering German morale, yet over heavy consideration it was decided that the plan was impractical and unlikely to work; and in the end Operation Thunderclap was never fully implemented.
  • Battle of Iwo Jima

    Battle of Iwo Jima
    In the intense battle of Iwo Jima, Japanese and U.S soldiers ensuing in some o f the bloodiest fighting in WWII for five weeks. The Japanese island of Iwo Jima had great importance in 1945, as it was within fighter range of the Japanese capital and could support the U.S. war efforts greatly. In addition, if the U.S. were to air raid or bomb Japan, which they did, then Iwo Jima would prove extremely beneficial because Japan wouldn't be able to informed and perform a counter-strike in time.
  • Operation Thunderclap

    Operation Thunderclap
    The Thunderclap Plan involved a massive Allied attack, with heavy Soviet advances, on Berlin that would supposedly result in anywhere from 100,000-200,000 German casualties, many of them being influential German personnel. The plan had high hopes on shattering German morale, yet after heavy consideration the Allies decided that the plan was impractical and unlikely to work; in the end never being fully implemented.
  • Battle of Iwo Jima

    Battle of Iwo Jima
    The intense battle of Iwo Jima was between the U.S. Marines and the Imperial Army of Japan in which the U.S. planned to occupy the small Japanese island of Iwo Jima. Holding this land held great importance in 1945, as it was fighter range of the Japanese capital and could support the U.S. greatly when it came to air raids and bombings. To elaborate, Iwo Jima was close enough to Japan to assist resupplying pilots, and also prevent warnings of Allied attack in order to stop any counter-strikes.
  • Battle of Okinawa

    Battle of Okinawa
    The Battle of Okinawa was by far one of the bloodiest battles as well as the last major battle of World War II. By this time in the war much of the once Nazi-occupied Europe was being liberated by American and Soviet troops; and now this would be American forces last final push towards Japan. More than 12,000 Americans and 150,000 Japanese were killed during the battle. Despite the casualties, U.S. preparations were quickly underway for the long-anticipated invasion of Japan.
  • VE Day

    VE Day
    On Tuesday 8 in May of 1945 cam the Victory in Europe Day, and it forever marked the formal conclusion of Adolf Hitler's war. Cities worldwide put out flags and banners, rejoicing in the defeat of the Nazi and the long-coming end of the 6 years of misery, suffering, courage, and endurance of millions across the world. A radio broadcast from Stalin himself states, “The age-long struggle of the Slav nations... has ended in victory. Your courage has defeated the Nazis. The war is over" (HISTORY).
  • Thunderclap Plan

    Thunderclap Plan
    The Thunderclap Plan involved a massive Allied attack, with heavy Soviet advances, on Berlin that would supposedly result in anywhere from 100,000-200,000 German casualties, many of them being influential German personnel. The plan had high hopes on shattering German morale, yet after heavy consideration the Allies decided that the plan was impractical and unlikely to work; in the end never being fully implemented.
  • Battle of Iwo Jima

    Battle of Iwo Jima
    The intense battle of Iwo Jima was between the U.S. Marines and the Imperial Army of Japan in which the U.S. planned to occupy the small Japanese island of Iwo Jima. Holding this land held great importance in 1945, as it was fighter range of the Japanese capital and could support the U.S. greatly when it came to air raids and bombings. To elaborate, Iwo Jima was close enough to Japan to assist resupplying pilots, and also prevent warnings of Allied attack in order to stop any counter-strikes.
  • Battle of Okinawa

    Battle of Okinawa
    The Battle of Okinawa was by far one of the bloodiest battles as well as the last major battle of World War II. By this time in the war much of the once Nazi-occupied Europe was being liberated by American and Soviet troops; and now this would be American forces last final push towards Japan. More than 12,000 Americans and 150,000 Japanese were killed during the battle. Despite the casualties, U.S. preparations were quickly underway for the long-anticipated invasion of Japan.
  • Liberation of Concentration Camps

    Liberation of Concentration Camps
    The liberation of most concentration camps took place in the first few months of 1945. Majdanek, a German occupied camp in Poland was the first major camp to be liberated by Allied forces. Some camps in Poland were destroyed by the Nazis as word of the Soviets approached. So one question bears the sorrows of millions, "What would've happened if only the liberation had taken place a month earlier?"
  • VE Day

    VE Day
    On Tuesday 8 of May on 1945 came Victory in Europe Day, calling for the formal conclusion of Adolf Hitler's war efforts. Cities worldwide put out flags and banners, rejoicing in the defeat of the Nazi and the long-coming end of six years of misery, suffering, courage and endurance, of millions across the world. The next day came a radio broadcast Stalin stating, “The age-long struggle of the Slav nations… has ended in victory. Your courage has defeated the Nazis. The war is over" (HISTORY).
  • Dropping of the Atomic Bombs

    Dropping of the Atomic Bombs
    The United States dropped two atomic bombs on Japan forever ending the Second World War. After many unrecognized warnings to the Japanese government, the U.S. detonated two atomic bombs over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, killing 210,000 Japanese children, women, and men. The war could be ended few other ways, as Truman was warned by some of his advisers that any attempt to invade would result in horrific American casualties, the new weapon must be used to bring the war to end.
  • VJ Day

    VJ Day
    VJ Day, otherwise known as Victory in the Pacific Day, is a day that commemorates Japan’s surrender during the Second World War and effectively brought an end to the everlasting war. "Coming several months after the surrender of Nazi Germany, Japan’s capitulation in the Pacific brought six years of hostilities to a final and highly anticipated close" (HISTORY). Japans Emperor Hirohito blamed the use of the “new and most cruel bomb” on Hiroshima and Nagasaki for the country’s defeat.