WW2 Timeline

Timeline created by yuta123
In History
  • Stalin's totalitarian government in the soviet union

    Stalin's totalitarian government in the soviet union
    Joseph Stalin took control of the Soviet Union. Stalin focused on creating a model communist state. In so doing, he made
    both agricultural and industrial growth the prime economic goals of the Soviet Union. Stalin abolished all privately owned farms and replaced them with collectives—large government-owned farms, each worked by hundreds of families. Stalin moved to transform the Soviet Union from a backward rural nation into a great industrial power.
  • Mussolini in Italy

    Mussolini in Italy
    Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini was Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Italy from his golpe in 1922 to 1943, and Duce of Fascism from 1919 to his execution in 1945 during the Italian civil war. As dictator of Italy and founder of fascism, Mussolini inspired several totalitarian rulers such as Adolf Hitler.
  • Hitler in Germany

    Hitler in Germany
    Adolf Hitler was a German politician and leader of the Nazi Party. He rose to power as Chancellor of Germany in 1933 and later Führer in 1934. During his dictatorship from 1933 to 1945, he initiated World War II in Europe by invading Poland in September 1939
  • Mein Kampf

    Mein Kampf
    a 1925 autobiographical manifesto by Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler. The work describes the process by which Hitler became antisemitic and outlines his political ideology and future plans for Germany.
  • Stormtroopers

    Stormtroopers
    Stormtroopers were specialist soldiers of the German Army in World War I.
  • Japanese invasion of Manchuria

    Japanese invasion of Manchuria
    The Japanese army seizes the town of Manchuria, China. Under Japanese control, Manchuria was one of the most brutally run regions in the world.
  • Third Reich

    Third Reich
    Third Reich, official Nazi designation for the regime in Germany from January 1933 to May 1945, as the presumed successor of the medieval and early modern Holy Roman Empire of 800 to 1806 (the First Reich) and the German Empire of 1871 to 1918 (the Second Reich).
  • Hitler's military buildup in Germany

    Hitler's military buildup in Germany
    German rearmament was a policy and practice of rearmament carried out in Germany during the interwar period in violation of the Treaty of Versailles. It began on a small, secret, and informal basis shortly after the treaty was signed, but it was massively expanded after the Nazi Party came to power in 1933.
  • Francisco Franco

    Francisco Franco
    Francisco Franco Bahamonde was a Spanish general and politician who ruled over Spain as Head of State and dictator under the title Caudillo from 1939, after the Nationalist victory in the Spanish Civil War, until his death in 1975.
  • Hitler invades the Rhineland

    Hitler invades the Rhineland
    Nazi leader Adolf Hitler violates the Treaty of Versailles and the Locarno Pact by sending German military forces into the Rhineland, a demilitarized zone along the Rhine River in western Germany
  • Mussolini invades Ethiopia

    Mussolini invades Ethiopia
    The Second Italo-Ethiopian War, also referred to as the Second Italo-Abyssinian War, was a colonial war fought from 3 October 1935 until 19 February 1937, although Addis Ababa was captured on 5 May 1936. The war was fought between the armed forces of the Kingdom of Italy and those of the Ethiopian Empire.
  • Rome-Berlin Axis

    Rome-Berlin Axis
    Rome-Berlin Axis, Coalition formed in 1936 between Italy and Germany. An agreement formulated by Italy's foreign minister Galeazzo Ciano informally linking the two fascist countries was reached on October 25, 1936. It was formalized by the Pact of Steel in 1939. The term Axis Powers came to include Japan as well.
  • Hitler's Anschluss

    Hitler's Anschluss
    Anschluss refers to the annexation of Austria into Nazi Germany on 12 March 1938.
  • Munich Agreement

    Munich Agreement
    The Munich Agreement or Munich Betrayal was an agreement concluded at Munich on 29 September 1938, by Germany, Great Britain, France, and Italy. It provided "cession to Germany of the Sudeten German territory" of Czechoslovakia
  • Nonagression pact

    Nonagression pact
    On August 23, 1939–shortly before World War II (1939-45) broke out in Europe–enemies Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union surprised the world by signing the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact, in which the two countries agreed to take no military action against each other for the next 10 years.
  • Britain and France declare war on germany

    Britain and France declare war on germany
    Britain and France declare war on Germany. Britain and France are at war with Germany following the invasion of Poland two days ago. At 1115 BST the Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain, announced the British deadline for the withdrawal of German troops from Poland had expired.
  • Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg
    A German term for “lightning war,” blitzkrieg is a military tactic designed to create disorganization among enemy forces through the use of mobile forces and locally concentrated firepower. Its successful execution results in short military campaigns, which preserves human lives and limits the expenditure of artillery.
  • Phony War

    Phony War
    'Phoney War' is the name given to the period of time in World War Two from September 1939 to April 1940 when, after the blitzkrieg attack on Poland in September 1939, seemingly nothing happened.
  • Marshal Phillipe Petain

    Marshal Phillipe Petain
    Henri Philippe Benoni Omer Joseph Pétain generally known as Philippe Pétain, was a French general officer who attained the position of Marshal of France at the end of World War I, during which he became known as The Lion of Verdun, and in World War II served as the Chief of State of Vichy France from 1940 to 1944.
  • Hitler's invasion of Denmark and Norway

    Hitler's invasion of Denmark and Norway
    Norway was invaded by Nazi Germany on April 9th 1940. Hitler had issued the order for the invasion of Norway on March 1st under the code word “Weserübung”. The order also included the invasion and occupation of Denmark. It was the start of war in Western Europe – and an end to the 'Phony War'.
  • Battle of Britain

    Battle of Britain
    The battle of britain was a military campaign of the Second World War, in which the Royal Air Force defended the United Kingdom against large-scale attacks by Nazi Germany's air force, the Luftwaffe. It has been described as the first major military campaign fought entirely by air forces. British victory
  • Battle of the Atlantic

    Battle of the Atlantic
    The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest continuous military campaign in World War II, running from 1939 to the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945, and was a major part of the Naval history of World War II. At its core was the Allied naval blockade of Germany, announced the day after the declaration of war, and Germany's subsequent counter-blockade. It was at its height from mid-1940 through to the end of 1943.
  • Lend-Lease Act

    Lend-Lease Act
    The Lend-Lease Act was a United States program to provide the Allied powers with aid and military materiel in World War II.
  • War Productions Board

    War Productions Board
    The War Production Board was an agency of the United States government that supervised war production during World War II. President Franklin D. Roosevelt established it in January 1942, with Executive Order 9024.
  • Office of Price Administration

    Office of Price Administration
    The Office of Price Administration (OPA) was established within the Office for Emergency Management of the United States government by Executive Order 8875 on August 28, 1941. The functions of the OPA were originally to control money (price controls) and rents after the outbreak of World War II.
  • Pearl Harbor attack

    The Attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service upon the United States (a neutral country at the time) against the naval base at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii on Sunday morning, December 7, 1941. The attack led to the United States' formal entry into World War II the next day.
  • Internment

    Internment
    The internment of Japanese Americans in the United States during World War II was the forced relocation and incarceration in concentration camps in the western interior of the country of between 110,000 and 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry, most of whom lived on the Pacific coast. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens. These actions were ordered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt shortly after Imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor.
  • Korematsu vs. United States

    Korematsu vs. United States
    Korematsu v. United States was a landmark United States Supreme Court case concerning the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066, which ordered Japanese Americans into internment camps during World War II regardless of their citizenship. In a 6–3 decision, the Court sided with the government, ruling that the exclusion order was constitutional. Six of the eight justices appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt sided with Roosevelt.
  • U.S. Convoy System

    U.S. Convoy System
    A convoy is a group of vehicles, typically motor vehicles or ships, traveling together for mutual support and protection. Often, a convoy is organized with armed defensive support. It may also be used in a non-military sense, for example when driving through remote areas.
  • Women's Auxiliary Army Corps

    Women's Auxiliary Army Corps
    The Women's Army Corps was the women's branch of the United States Army. It was created as an auxiliary unit, the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps on 15 May 1942 by Public Law 554, and converted to an active duty status in the Army of the United States as the WAC on 1 July 1943.
  • battle of stalingrad

    battle of stalingrad
    The Battle of Stalingrad was the largest confrontation of World War II, in which Germany and its allies fought the Soviet Union for control of the city of Stalingrad in Southern Russia.
    Marked by fierce close quarters combat and direct assaults on civilians in air raids, it was the largest (nearly 2.2 million personnel) and bloodiest (1.8–2 million killed, wounded or captured) battle in the history of warfare.
  • Operation torch

    Operation torch
    Operation Torch was the Anglo-American invasion of French Morocco and Algeria during the North African Campaign of World War II. It began on November 8 and concluded on November 16, 1942.
  • Unconditional surrender

    Unconditional surrender
    Aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan formally surrenders to the Allies, bringing an end to World War II. By the summer of 1945, the defeat of Japan was a foregone conclusion. ... Ten days later, the Allies issued the Potsdam Declaration, demanding the “unconditional surrender of all the Japanese armed forces.”
  • Bloody Anzio

    Bloody Anzio
    The Battle of Anzio was a battle of the Italian Campaign of World War II that took place from January 22, 1944 to June 5, 1944. The operation was opposed by German forces in the area of Anzio and Nettuno. The battle ended with Rome being capturedThe operation was initially commanded by Major General John P. Lucas, of the U.S. Army, commanding U.S. VI Corps with the intention being to outflank German forces at the Winter Line and enable an attack on Rome.
  • D-Day

    D-Day
    The Normandy landings were the landing operations on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. Code-named Operation Neptune and often referred to as D-Day, it was the largest seaborne invasion in history. The operation began the liberation of German-occupied France (and later Europe) from Nazi control, and laid the foundations of the Allied victory on the Western Front.
  • Battle of the Bulge

    Battle of the Bulge
    The Battle of the Bulge, also known as the Ardennes Counteroffensive, took place from 16 December 1944 to 25 January 1945, and was the last major German offensive campaign on the Western Front during World War II. It was launched through the densely forested Ardennes region of Wallonia in eastern Belgium, northeast France, and Luxembourg, towards the end of the war in Europe.
  • Harry S. Truman

    Harry S. Truman
    He was Franklin Delano Roosevelt's vice president for just 82 days before Roosevelt died and Truman became the 33rd president. In his first months in office he dropped the atomic bomb on Japan, ending World War II.
  • Death of Hitler

    Death of Hitler
    Adolf Hitler was an Austrian-German politician who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945, and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. He killed himself by gunshot on 30 April 1945 in his Führerbunker in Berlin. Eva Braun, his wife of one day, committed suicide with him by taking cyanide.
  • V-E Day

    V-E Day
    Victory in Europe Day, generally known as VE Day or V-E Day, is a day celebrating the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces on the 8 May 1945. On 30 April 1945, Adolf Hitler, the Nazi leader, committed suicide during the Battle of Berlin.
  • Manhattan Project

    Manhattan Project
    The Manhattan Project was a research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons. It was led by the United States with the support of the United Kingdom and Canada.
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