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The Renaissance

  • Jan 1, 1485

    Richard III is killed in battle

    Richard III is killed in battle
    Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, marked the end of the Middle Ages in England. He is the protagonist of Richard III, one of William Shakespeare's history plays.
  • 1485

    Richard lll is killed in battle

    Richard lll is killed in battle
    Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, marked the end of the Middle Ages in England. He is the protagonist of Richard III, one of William Shakespeare's history plays.
  • Jan 1, 1492

    Christopher Columbus reaches the Americas

    Christopher Columbus reaches the Americas
    Christopher Columbus (31 October 1451 – 20 May 1506) was an Italian explorer, navigator, and colonist who completed four voyages across the Atlantic Ocean. He led the first European expeditions to the Caribbean, Central America, and South America, initiating the permanent European colonization of the Americas. Columbus discovered the viable sailing route to the Americas, a continent which was not then known to Europeans.
  • 1492

    Chrisropher Columbus reaches the Americas

    Chrisropher Columbus reaches the Americas
    European re-discovery and colonization of the Americas
    In 1492, a Spanish-based transatlantic maritime expedition led by Christopher Columbus encountered the Americas, continents which were largely unknown in Europe and were outside the Old World political and economic system. Columbus made a total of four voyages to the Americas between 1492 and 1502, setting the stage for the European exploration and colonization of the Americas, ultimately leading to the Columbian Exchange.
  • 1503

    Leonardo da Vinci paints the Mona Lisa

    Leonardo da Vinci paints the Mona Lisa
    The Mona Lisa ; is a half-length portrait painting by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci that has been described as "the best known, the most visited, the most written about, the most sung about, the most parodied work of art in the world".The Mona Lisa is also one of the most valuable paintings in the world. It holds the Guinness World Record for the highest known insurance valuation in history at $100 million in 1962, which is worth nearly $800 million in 2017.
  • 1516

    Thomas More's Utopia is published

    Thomas More's Utopia is published
    Utopia is a work of fiction and socio-political satire by Thomas More (1478–1535) published in Latin. The book is a frame narrative primarily depicting a fictional island society and its religious, social and political customs. Many aspects of More's description of Utopia are reminiscent of life in monasteries.
  • 1543

    With the Supremacy Act, Henry Vlll proclaims himself head of Church of England

    With the Supremacy Act, Henry Vlll proclaims himself head of Church of England
    The Supreme Head of the Church of England was a title created in 1531 for King Henry VIII of England, who was responsible for the foundation of the English Protestant church that broke away from the authority of the Roman Catholic Church after Pope Paul III excommunicated Henry in 1538 over his divorce from Catherine of Aragon. The Act of Supremacy confirmed the King's status as having supremacy over the church and required the nobility to swear an oath recognizing Henry's supremacy.
  • 1558

    Elizabeth l becomes queen of England

    Elizabeth l becomes queen of England
    Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last of the five monarchs of the House of Tudor.
  • 1564

    William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon, is born

    William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon, is born
    William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". Some of his works include 39 plays and 154 sonnets. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.
  • Globe Theatre is built in London

    Globe Theatre is built in London
    The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son, Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613.
  • Period: to

    Shakespeare writes King Lear and Macbeth

    King Lear is a tragedy depicting the gradual descent into madness of the title character, after he disposes of his kingdom by giving bequests to two of his three daughters egged on by their continual flattery, bringing tragic consequences for all.
    Macbeth is a tragedy dramatizing the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake.
  • Shakespeare writes King Lear and Macbeth

    Shakespeare writes King Lear and Macbeth
    King Lear is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare. It depicts the gradual descent into madness of the title character, after he disposes of his kingdom by giving bequests to two of his three daughters egged on by their continual flattery, bringing tragic consequences for all. Macbeth is a tragedy also by Shakespeare; it is thought to have been first performed in 1606. It dramatizes the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake.
  • First permanent English settlement in North America is established at Jamestown, Virginia

    First permanent English settlement in North America is established at Jamestown, Virginia
    The Jamestown settlement in the Colony of Virginia was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas. It was located on the east bank of the Powhatan (James) River about 2.5 mi (4 km) southwest of the center of modern Williamsburg. William Kelso writes that Jamestown "is where the British Empire began". It was established by the Virginia Company of London as "James Fort" on May 4, 1607 O.S.;(May 14, 1607 N.S.),and was considered permanent after brief abandonment in 1610.
  • Shakespeare's sonnets are published

    Shakespeare's sonnets are published
    Shakespeare's sonnets are poems that William Shakespeare wrote on a variety of themes. When discussing or referring to Shakespeare’s sonnets, it is almost always a reference to the 154 sonnets that were first published all together in a quarto in 1609; however there are six additional sonnets that Shakespeare wrote and included in the plays Romeo and Juliet, Henry V and Love's Labour's Lost.
  • The Mayflower lands at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts

    The Mayflower lands at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts
    Plymouth is a town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. The town holds a place of great prominence in American history, folklore, and culture, and is known as "America's Hometown." Plymouth was the site of the colony founded in 1620 by the Mayflower Pilgrims, where New England was first established. Plymouth served as the capital of Plymouth Colony from its founding in 1620 until the colony's merger with the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1691.
  • Newspapers first published in London

    Newspapers first published in London
    During the 17th century there were many kinds of news publications and told both the news and rumours. Among these were pamphlets, posters, ballads etc. Even when the news periodicals emerged, many of these co-existed with them. At the beginning of the 17th century, the right to print was strictly controlled in England. The publication of these newsbooks was suspended between 1632 and 1638 by order of Star Chamber.
  • John Milton begins Paradise Lost

    John Milton begins Paradise Lost
    Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton (1608–1674). It is considered by critics to be Milton's major work, and it helped solidify his reputation as one of the greatest English poets of his time.The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. Milton's purpose, stated in Book I, is to "justify the ways of God to men"
  • Puritan Commonwealth ends; monarchy is restored with Charles ll

    Puritan Commonwealth ends; monarchy is restored with Charles ll
    The Restoration of the English monarchy took place in the Stuart period. It began in 1660 when the English, Scottish, and Irish monarchies were all restored under King Charles II. This followed the Interregnum, also called the Protectorate, that followed the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. The term Restoration is used to describe both the actual event by which the monarchy was restored, and the period of several years afterwards in which a new political settlement was established.