The history of British architecture

Timeline created by darya_sergeevna
In History
  • 3,600 BCE

    Prehistoric architecture

    Prehistoric architecture
    The West Kennet Long Barrow is a Neolithic tomb or barrow, situated on a prominent chalk ridge, near Silbury Hill, one-and-a-half miles south of Avebury in Wiltshire, England.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Kennet_Long_Barrow
  • 1,300 BCE

    Celtic Roundhouse

    Celtic Roundhouse
    Celtic Roundhouses were the standard form of housing built in Britain from the Bronze Age throughout the Iron Age, and in some areas well into the Sub Roman period. They used walls made either of stone or of wooden posts joined by wattle-and-daub panels and a conical thatched roof and ranged in size from less than 5m in diameter to over 15m https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roundhouse_(dwelling)
  • Mar 6, 800

    Anglo-Saxon architecture

    Anglo-Saxon architecture
    Anglo-Saxon architecture was a period in the history of architecture in England, and parts of Wales, from the mid-5th century until the Norman Conquest of 1066. Anglo-Saxon secular buildings in Britain were generally simple, constructed mainly using timber with thatch for roofing.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxon_architecture
  • Mar 6, 1100

    Vernacular architecture

    Vernacular architecture
    Most domestic buildings were built on timber frames, usually with wattle and daub infill. Roofs were typically covered with thatch; Typically, houses of this period were based around a great hall open from floor to roof. One bay at each end was split into two storeys and used for service rooms and private rooms for the owner.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_of_England
  • Mar 6, 1500

    Tudor architecture

    Tudor architecture
    By the time of Henry VII's accession castle-building in England had come to an end and under the Tudors ostentatious unfortified country houses and palaces became widespread, built either in stone or in brick, which first became a common building material in England in this period.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_of_England
  • English Baroque

    English Baroque
    English Baroque is a term sometimes used to refer to the developments in English architecture that were parallel to the evolution of Baroque architecture in continental Europe between the Great Fire of London (1666) and the Treaty of Utrecht (1713).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Baroque
  • Victorian architecture

    Victorian architecture
    Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901) The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles mixed with the introduction of middle east and Asian influences.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victorian_architecture
  • High-Tech architecture

    High-Tech architecture
    High-tech architecture is mostly associated with non-domestic buildings, perhaps due to the technological imagery. The two most prominent proponents were Richard Rogers and Norman Foster. Rogers' most iconic English building is the Lloyd's building.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd%27s_building