Renaissance Time Line

Timeline created by Hadan.Bartlett
  • Sep 26, 1485

    Richard lll is killed in battle

    Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England for two years, from 1483 until his death in 1485 during the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at the Battle of Bosworth Field was the decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses and is sometimes regarded as the end of the Middle Ages in England. He is the subject of an eponymous play by William Shakespeare.
  • Sep 26, 1492

    christopher columbus reaches the americas

    Columbus led his three ships - the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria - out of the Spanish port of Palos on August 3, 1492. His objective was to sail west until he reached Asia (the Indies) where the riches of gold, pearls and spice awaited. His first stop was the Canary Islands where the lack of wind left his expedition becalmed until September 6. Once underway, Columbus benefited from calm seas and steady winds that pushed him steadily westward (Columbus had discovered the southern "Trades"
  • Sep 26, 1503

    leonardo de vinci paints the mona lisa

    The Mona Lisa (La Gioconda or La Joconde, or Portrait of Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo[1]) is a half-length portrait of a woman by the Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci, which has been acclaimed as "the best known, the most visited, the most written about, the most sung about, the most parodied work of art in the world."[2]
  • Sep 26, 1516

    Thomas More's Utopia is published

    First published in 1516, Saint Thomas More's Utopia is one of the most important works of European humanism. Through the voice of the mysterious traveller Raphael Hythloday, More describes a pagan, communist city-state governed by reason. Addressing such issues as religious pluralism, women's rights, state-sponsored education, colonialism, and justified warfare, Utopia seems remarkably contemporary nearly five centuries after it was written, and it remains a foundational text in philosophy
  • Sep 26, 1543

    supremacy act henry lll procliams himself head of church

    Besides his six marriages, Henry VIII is known for his role in the separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church. Henry's struggles with Rome led to the separation of the Church of England from papal authority, the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and establishing himself as the Supreme Head of the Church of England. Yet he remained a believer in core Catholic theological teachings, even after his excommunication from the Catholic Church
  • Sep 26, 1558

    elizabeth l becomes queen of england

    Elizabeth I (known simply as "Elizabeth" until the accession of Elizabeth II; 7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was queen regnant of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. Sometimes called "The Virgin Queen", "Gloriana", or "Good Queen Bess", Elizabeth was the fifth and last monarch of the Tudor dynasty. The daughter of Henry VIII, she was born a princess, but her mother, Anne Boleyn, was executed two and a half years after her birth, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate.
  • Sep 26, 1564

    William Shakespear, the Bard of Avon, is born

    William Shakespeare is one of the greatest poets and playwrights in the world. He changed the way plays were written by creating new styles of writing. William was born in April, 1564, in Stratford-upon-Avon, England. Although the exact date of William's birth is unknown, we recognize his birthday on April 23. This date was chosen because William was baptized on April 26, and it was customary to baptize children three days after they were born.
  • Globe Theatre is built in London

    The first theatres in the country were built during the Tudor period. London's Globe Theatre was built in 1599 and destroyed by fire 14 years later. William Shakespeare made the Globe the most famous theatre in the country. The new Globe theatre was opened in 1997 and 16th century building methods were used to construct it.
  • shakespeare writes king lear and macbeth

    In Othello, the villain Iago stokes Othello's sexual jealousy to the point where he murders the innocent wife who loves him.[93] In King Lear, the old king commits the tragic error of giving up his powers, initiating the events which lead to the torture and blinding of the Earl of Gloucester and the murder of Lear's youngest daughter Cordelia. According to the critic Frank Kermode, "the play offers neither its good characters nor its audience any relief from its cruelty.
  • English settlement in jamestown virgina

    Late in the 19th century, Jamestown became the focus of renewed historical interest and efforts at preservation. In 1893, a portion of the island was donated to Preservation Virginia (formerly known as The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities) for that purpose. The actual location of the 1607 fort was thought to be underwater, lost due to erosion.
  • Shakespeares sonnets are publshed

    Shakespeare's sonnets were published in 1609, no doubt without authorization, by the unsavory Thomas Thorpe (1580-1614), described as "a publishing understrapper of piratical habits" who "hung about scriveners' shops"; in order to pinch manuscripts. There was no reprint until 1640. Despite a conspiracy theory that would insist that the volume was suppressed, sonnets just were not in vogue anymore.
  • king james bible is published

    The Authorized Version, commonly known as the King James Version, King James Bible, AV, KJB, or KJV, is an English translation of the Christian Bible by the Church of England begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.[3] First printed by the King's Printer Robert Barker,[4][5] this was the third official translation into English. The first was the Great Bible commissioned by the Church of England in the reign of King Henry VIII, and the second was the Bishop's Bible of 1568.
  • mayflower lands at plymouth rock, massachusetts

    The location of the Plymouth Rock (more specifically, Dedham granodiorite, a glacial erratic), at the foot of Cole's Hill allegedly passed from generation to generation in the first century after the Pilgrims' landing in 1620. When plans were afoot to build a wharf at the Pilgrim's landing site in 1741, a 94-year-old Elder of the church named Thomas Faunce
  • newspaper are first published in london

    During the 17th century, there were many kinds of publications, that told both news and rumours. Among these were pamphlets, posters, ballads etc. Even when the news periodicals emerged, many of these co-existed with them. A news periodical differs from these mainly because of its periodicity. The definition for 17th century newsbooks and newspapers is that they are published at least once a week.
  • John milton begins paradise lost

    Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton. It was originally published in 1667 in ten books, with a total of over ten thousand individual lines of verse. A second edition followed in 1674, changed into twelve books (in the manner of the division of Virgil's Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout and a note on the versification
  • puritan commonwealth ends monarchy is restored with charles ll

    The Restoration of the English monarchy began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under Charles II after the Interregnum that followed the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. The term Restoration is used to describe both the actual event by which the monarchy was restored, and the period of several years afterwards in which a new political settlement was established.