Renaissance

Renaissance

  • Jan 1, 1485

    1485 Richard III is killed in battle

    1485 Richard III is killed in battle
    Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England for two years, from 1483 until his death in 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, symbolises the end of the Middle Ages in England.
  • Jan 1, 1492

    1492 Christopher Columbus reaches the Americas

    1492 Christopher Columbus reaches the Americas
    Christopher Columbus was an Italian explorer, navigator, and colonizer, born in the Republic of Genoa. Under the auspices of the Catholic Monarchs of Spain, he completed four voyages across the Atlantic Ocean that led to general European awareness of the American continents. Those voyages, and his efforts to establish permanent settlements on the island of Hispaniola, initiated the Spanish colonization of the New World.
  • Jan 1, 1503

    1503 Leonardo da Vinci paints the Mona Lisa

    1503 Leonardo da Vinci paints the Mona Lisa
    The Mona Lisa (Monna Lisa or La Gioconda in Italian; La Joconde in French) is a half-length portrait of a woman by the Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci. The painting, thought to be a portrait of Lisa Gherardini, the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, is in oil on a white Lombardy poplar panel, and is believed to have been painted between 1503 and 1506, although Leonardo may have continued working on it as late as 1517.
  • Jan 1, 1543

    1543 With the Supremacy Act, Henry VIII proclaims himself head of Church of England

    1543 With the Supremacy Act, Henry VIII proclaims himself head of Church of England
    Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. He was Lord, and later assumed the Kingship, of Ireland, as well as continuing the nominal claim by the English monarchs to the Kingdom of France. Henry was the second monarch of the Tudor dynasty, succeeding his father, Henry VII.
  • Jan 1, 1558

    1558 Elizabeth I becomes queen of England

    1558 Elizabeth I becomes queen of England
    Queen of England (1558–1603), the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. Through her Religious Settlement of 1559 she enforced the Protestant religion by law. She had Mary Queen of Scots executed in 1587. Her conflict with Roman Catholic Spain led to the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588. The Elizabethan age was expansionist in commerce and geographical exploration, and arts and literature flourished. The rulers of many European states made unsuccessful bids to marry Elizabeth, and she used
  • Jan 1, 1564

    1516 Thomas More's Utopia is published

    1516 Thomas More's Utopia is published
    Written in Latin for a European audience, More's Utopia is the quintessential humanist dialogue. First published in Louvain, Belgium, in 1516, Utopia was an immediate sensation. Set as a dialogue in Antwerp between More and a voyager returned from newly discovered lands, the complexity of the work ensured that it would have nearly as many interpretations as readers.
  • Jan 1, 1564

    1564 William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon, is born

    1564 William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon, is born
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), `The Bard of Avon', English poet and playwright wrote the famous 154 Sonnets and numerous highly successful oft quoted dramatic works including the tragedy of the Prince of Denmark, Hamlet;
  • Jan 1, 1564

    1564 William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon, is born

    1564 William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon, is born
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), `The Bard of Avon', English poet and playwright wrote the famous 154 Sonnets and numerous highly successful oft quoted dramatic works including the tragedy of the Prince of Denmark, Hamlet;
  • 1599 Globe Theatre is built in London

    1599 Globe Theatre is built in London
    The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son, Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613.
  • 1605-1606 Shakespeare writes King Lear and Macbeth

    1605-1606 Shakespeare writes King Lear and Macbeth
    King Lear is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. The title character descends into madness after disposing of his estate between two of his three daughters based on their flattery, bringing tragic consequences for all.
  • 1607 Permanent English settlement in North America is established at Jamestown, Virginia

    1607 Permanent English settlement in North America is established at Jamestown, Virginia
    Jamestown was a settlement in the Colony of Virginia, the first permanent English settlement in the Americas. Established by the Virginia Company of London as "James Fort" on May 24, 1607 (O.S., May 14, 1607 N.S.), and considered permanent after brief abandonment in 1610, it followed several earlier failed attempts, including the Lost Colony of Roanoke. Jamestown served as the capital of the colony for 83 years, from 1616 until 1699.
  • 1609 Shakespeares's sonnets are published

    1609 Shakespeares's sonnets are published
    Shakespeare's sonnets are a collection of 154 sonnets, dealing with themes such as the passage of time, love, beauty and mortality, first published in a 1609 quarto entitled SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS.
  • 1611 King James Bible is published

    1611 King James Bible is published
    The King James Version (KJV), commonly known as the Authorized Version (AV) or King James Bible (KJB), is an English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.
  • 1620 The Mayflower lands at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts

    1620 The Mayflower lands at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts
    Plymouth Rock is the traditional site of disembarkation of William Bradford and the Mayflower Pilgrims who founded Plymouth Colony in 1620. It is an important symbol in American history.
  • 1621 Newspapers are first published in London

    1621 Newspapers are first published in London
    Corante: or, Newes from Italy, Germany, Hungarie, Spaine and France was the first English newspaper.The earliest of the seven known surviving copies is dated September 24, 1621 (although John Chamberlain is on record as having complained about them in August), and the latest is dated October 22 of that same year.
  • 1658 John Milton begins Paradise Lost

    1658 John Milton begins Paradise Lost
    Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton (1608–1674). The first version, published in 1667, consisted of ten books with over ten thousand lines of verse. A second edition followed in 1674, arranged into twelve books (in the manner of Virgil's Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout and a note on the versification.
  • 1660 Puritan Commonwealth ends; monarchy is restored with Charles II

    The Commonwealth, or Commonwealth of England, was the period from 1649 onwards when England, along later with Ireland and Scotland, was ruled as a republic following the end of the Second English Civil War and the trial and execution of Charles I.