Charles Darwin

Timeline created by cmrausch
  • Charles Darwin's Birth

    Charles Darwin's Birth
    Charles Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. Source: Desmond, Adrian J. “Charles Darwin.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 1 Nov. 2019, www.britannica.com/biography/Charles-Darwin.
  • The Structure and Distribution of Coral Reefs

    One of Charles Darwin's first publications. The manuscript describes the coral atolls he encountered throughout the Pacific Ocean. Prevailing theory at the time held that the atolls were formed as corals took root and grew on undersea craters. Yet in all his travels, Darwin never encountered anything that could explain the presence of such large and oddly shaped craters throughout the oceans. Instead Darwin proposed that as low-lying islands sink into the sea, coral reefs grow upward.
  • On the Origin of Species by Natural Selection

    On the Origin of Species by Natural Selection
    Charles Darwin published his book On the Origins of Species by Natural Selection. Darwin probably wouldn't have published in 1859 if not spurred by Alfred Russel Wallace's paper touching on the idea of natural selection. This book would attract attention and controversy because of the social and religious implications. Darwin concluded from his trip on the HMS Beagle that species change through natural selection.
  • Charles Darwin's death

    Charles Darwin died in Downe, Kent Source: Desmond, Adrian J. “Charles Darwin.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 1 Nov. 2019, www.britannica.com/biography/Charles-Darwin.
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    The Beagle Voyage

    The voyage of the HMS Beagle would be the making of then 22 year old Darwin. The confinement of the ship was offset by his ability to get out and explore the Brazilian jungles and Andes Mountains. On the last leg of this journey, Darwin finished his 770-page diary, wrapped up 1,750 pages of notes, drew up 12 catalogs of his 5,436 skins, bones, and carcasses.
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    Study of Barnacles

    Darwin added to his credibility as an expert on species by pursuing a detailed study of all known barnacles. Intrigued by their sexual differentiation, he discovered that some females had tiny degenerate males clinging to them. That sparked his interest in the evolution of diverging male and female forms from an original hermaphrodite creature. Four monographs on such an obscure group made him a world expert and gained him the Royal Society’s Royal Medal in 1853.