Apple

Timeline created by aldabog79
  • Apple

    Apple
    April Apple unveils the Apple II—the first PC with color graphics—at the first West Coast Computer Faire. It includes a keyboard, a power supply, and a snazzy case.
    April: Rob Janov, an art director at Regis McKenna, Apple’s public-relations agency, designs the company’s new logo: a silhouette of a bitten apple with six color stripes.
    June The Apple II becomes available to the public. It includes 4K of standard memory, two game paddles, and a demo cassette (price: $1,298).
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    March: Apple introduces interface cards for connecting its computers to most printers. June The Apple Disk II, a miniature floppy-disk drive, debuts at the Consumer Electronics Show (price: $595).
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    May Software Arts unveils VisiCalc, an electronic spreadsheet. One of the first “killer apps,” it helped spur sales of the Apple II.
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    May At the National Computer Conference, Apple announces the Apple III, which features a new operating system, a built-in disk controller, and four peripheral slots. Rushed production and poor direction from Steve Jobs lead to missed ship dates, performance problems, and disappointing sales (price: $4,300-$7,800).
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    September: Apple’s first mass storage system, the 5MB ProFile hard disk, is introduced (price: $3,499).
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    July: Apple rolls out the Apple Dot Matrix printer (price: $2,195).
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    Apple
    November: AppleWorks, an integrated package containing word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications, hits the market. December: Apple releases the ImageWriter printer (price: $675).
  • Apple

    Apple
    January: The landmark “1984” commercial introduces the Macintosh during Super Bowl XVIII (won by the Los Angeles Raiders).
    January: The first issue of Macworld, featuring Steve Jobs on the cover, hits newsstands (price: $4).
    January: Microsoft releases Word 1.0 for Mac. September: Apple ships the Macintosh 512K (price: $3,195).
  • Apple

    January: Apple releases the Apple LaserWriter (price: $7,000).
    April: Apple introduces the ImageWriter II, the HD-20 hard disk, and the Apple Personal Modem. April: FileMaker 1.0, developed by Nashoba Systems and published by Forethought, makes its Mac debut.
    April: Apple releases System 2.0. September: Microsoft introduces Excel for Mac.
  • Apple

    Apple
    January: The first Macworld Expo is held at San Francisco’s Moscone Center.
    January: Apple releases the Apple LaserWriter (price: $7,000).
    April: Apple introduces the ImageWriter II, the HD-20 hard disk, and the Apple Personal Modem.
    April: FileMaker 1.0, developed by Nashoba Systems
    April: Apple releases System 2.0.
    July: Aldus releases PageMaker, a page-layout application that ushers in the desktop-publishing era
    September: Microsoft introduces Excel for Mac.
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    May: The Power Mac 9500 ships (price: $5,300). June: Apple launches eWorld, an online service. After failing to catch on, eWorld shuts down in March 1996. October: The first multiprocessor Mac ships—but not from Apple. DayStar Digital’s DayStar Genesis MP 528 features four 132MHz PowerPC 604 processors (price: $10,000)
  • Apple

    January: Apple releases System 3.0. January: Apple releases the Macintosh Plus. The first Mac to include a SCSI port, it was aimed at answering complaints that the original Mac wasn’t expandable (price: $2,600). In Other News: Steve Jobs invests $10 million in a Lucasfilm division named Pixar; a Mac Plus makes a memorable cameo in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home ; the first Nintendo video games arrive in the U.S.
  • Apple

    January: New desktop communications products include the AppleShare file-server application (price: $799) and the AppleTalk PC Card (price: $399).
    March: The Macintosh II—which is both the first color Mac and the first NuBus Mac—debuts (price: $3,989-$5,498).
    July Microsoft releases PowerPoint 1.0. The Mac version of the presentation software appears some three years before its Windows counterpart.
    October: Apple releases System 4.2 and Finder 6.0, combining both in System 5.0.
  • Apple

    May: To mark its 20th anniversary as a company, Apple releases the 20th Anniversary Macintosh (price: $10,000).
    August: Mac OS 8 ships. August: Macworld and MacUser merge into a single magazine. September: Jobs becomes Apple’s interim CEO. September: In a move that kills off the Mac clone market, Apple buys Power Computing for $100 million.
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    January: Microsoft launches Windows 2.03, featuring Mac-like icons and overlapping windows. March: Apple files a federal lawsuit against Microsoft claiming copyright infringement. June: Apple releases System 6.0.
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    June: Microsoft releases Office 1.0. September: Apple releases the Macintosh Portable (price: $6,500).
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    February: Adobe introduces Photoshop. March: The Macintosh IIfx debuts (price: $10,000-$12,000). November: Michael Spindler becomes Apple’s president.
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    Apple
    May: Apple announces QuickTime, a new system-software architecture for the integration of dynamic media. May: System 7.0 ships. October The PowerBook 100 debuts (price: $2,500).
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    April: Microsoft releases Windows 3.1; it became one of the first widely used PC GUI operating systems. May: IBM, Motorola, and Apple team up to make the PowerPC family of single-chip, reduced instruction set computer (RISC) microprocessors.
  • Apple

    August: Apple launches the Newton MessagePad handheld.
  • Apple

    Apple
    March: PowerPC processors make their Mac debut, with the release of the Power Mac 6100 (price: $1,700). March: Apple announces that Copland, its next-generation operating system, will ship in 1995 and be followed by another OS, code-named Gershwin, in 1996. It doesn’t and it won’t. September Apple announces its intent to support Mac clones, licensing Radius, Power Computing, and Umax. November: The Mac tops the 100MHz mark, with the PowerPC 601-powered Power Mac 8100.
  • Apple

    February: Apple attempts to enter the high-end server market with the Network Server 500 and 700 . May: Internet Explorer 2.0—the first Mac version of Microsoft’s Web browser—ships. August: Apple gets into the multiprocessor game with the dual-180MHz Power Mac 9500. Apple won’t release another dual-processor machine for four years.
    December: Apple buys Next and its OS, NextStep.
  • Apple

    Apple
    May: To mark its 20th anniversary as a company, Apple releases the 20th Anniversary Macintosh (price: $10,000).
    August: Mac OS 8 ships. August: Macworld and MacUser merge into a single magazine.
    September: In a move that kills off the Mac clone market, Apple buys Power Computing for $100 million.
  • Apple

    May Apple unveils a revised OS strategy, changing the name of its next-generation OS to OS X.
    August: Apple ships the first iMac (price: $1,299).
  • Apple

    Apple
    January: The Power Mac G3 comes out (price: $1,599-$4,999).
    January: The iMac adds new flavors—blueberry, tangerine, grape, lime, and strawberry, to be exact. In the next few years, Apple’s consumer line will go through numerous color shifts, including indigo, sage, ruby, snow, and (inexplicably) Blue Dalmatian.
    September: The iBook hits the market (price $1,599).
    September: The G4 chip becomes the processor for Power Macs (price: $1,599-$3,499).
    October: OS 9 ships.
  • Apple

    July: The Power Mac G4 Cube debuts (price: $1,799-$2,299). September: The public gets its hands on a beta version of OS X.
  • Apple

    anuary: The PowerBook G4 ushers in Apple’s shiny-metal look (price: $2,599-$3,499). March: OS X debuts.
    July: The G4 Cube becomes Apple’s best-looking failure: the company discontinues production. September: The new operating system gets a badly needed update with OS X 10.1. October: Apple enters the portable-music business, unveiling the first iPod music player.
  • Apple

    January: The flat-panel G4 iMac debuts; Apple pronounces the CRT officially dead (price: $1,299-$1,799).
    May: With the release of the Xserve, Apple makes its first push into the server market since its Network Server product line. The Xserve is the first Apple machine to include Double Data Rate (DDR) RAM (price: $2,999-$3,999).
    August: The Power Mac G4 hits the gigahertz mark.
  • Apple

    January: iLife—a suite that includes iPhoto, iDVD, iMovie
    April: Apple makes a splash in the music world, with the iTunes where users legally can legally download more than 200,000 songs for as little as 99 cents each.
    August: The G5 processor debuts in the Power Mac line, topped by the dual-2GHz Power Mac G5 (price: $2,999).
    October: The transition from the G3 chip is complete, as the iBook adds G4 processors.
  • Apple

    January: Music creation comes to the iLife suite, as GarageBand is introduced into iLife ’04.
    April: Apple expands its professional digital-video offerings with Motion, a motion-graphics program, and an updated version of Final Cut Pro that supports high-definition.
    June: The iTunes Music Store goes international, launching versions in France, Germany, and the U.K.
    August: The iMac gets a G5 processor and a new design—a flat-panel case that looks more like an LCD than a computer.
  • Apple

    January: The Keynote presentation software gets a long-awaited updated as part of the iWork ’05 suite that also introduces Pages.
    January: Apple goes small, introducing both a slimmed-down desktop—the Mac mini—and a flash-based music player—the iPod shuffle.
    October: The Power Mac line gets a processing boost with the introduction of dual-core chips—two processing engines on a single sliver of silicon.
  • Apple

    January: The first Intel-based Macs—a flat-panel iMac and the portable MacBook Pro—arrive.
    January: The iLife suite adds another component with the arrival of the Web site-creation tool, iWeb.
    February: The iTunes Music Store sells its 1 billionth song.
    February: With the addition of an Intel processor to the Mac mini line, half of Apple’s hardware offerings have made completed the Intel transition.
  • Apple

    "Imac" It features audio input and output, three USB 2.0 ports, FireWire 400 and 800, Gigabit Ethernet and video out. The slot-loading “SuperDrive” has been retained, along with a built-in iSight webcam and microphone.
    The system also has a new keyboard — confirming rumors that first appeared about a week ago, the keyboard shares the same thin design. It also sports special dedicated keys — dimmer, brighter, Exposé, Dashboard and media controls.
  • Apple

    The Mac Pro was last updated in January 2008 when Apple replaced the desktop’s two dual-core 2.66GHz Xeon chips with a pair of quad-core 2.8GHz processors. The iMac line underwent a spring overhaul, adding the Penryn processors that also power Apple’s laptops. The Mac mini has gone the longest without an update, remaining unchanged since 2007.
  • Apple

    This year, there are two models: a quad-core system with a 2.66GHz Nehalem Xeon processor, and an eight-core model running two quad-core Xeon processors at 2.26GHz. Also new to the Mac Pros are Nvidia GeForce GT 120 graphics cards and a revamped interior designed to ease user access for upgrading internal components.
  • Apple

    Apple on Monday issued a new version of Mac OS X 10.6.5 Server, superseding the update that was released last week. The new build, 10H575 contains a security patch not contained in the earlier build, 10H574, and is recommended for all users who installed the earlier version..
  • Apple

    You can get such a machine from Apple if you customize the new
    21.5-inch 2.5GHz Core i5 iMac ( ).
    The Build To Order Mac mini we tested doesn’t come cheap, however. To put together the machine, we took the standard configuration 2.5GHz dual-core Core i5 Mac mini ( ), and upgraded the processor to a 2.7GHz dual-core Core i7, which adds $100 to the original $799 price. We also replaced the standard 5400-rpm 500GB hard drive with a 256GB solid-state drive (SSD), which costs $600.
  • Apple

    It's the first pro Mac desktop in over three years and the fastest Mac yet made, granted, but still entirely familiar. And yet in many ways—some noticeable, some entirely invisible—this new Mac is completely different from all past Mac models. The iMac Pro may be an outlier today, but in the future we’ll probably look back on it as the start of a new era for the Mac, all because of the Apple-built T2 chip it carries inside. Here’s how the T2 makes this iMac Pro unlike all other Macs.
  • Apple

    More than anything else, WWDC is an event at which Apple will announce new operating systems and tell developers how to make apps that take advantage of their new features. Top of the list is iOS 14 a
    Recent rumors suggest that Apple is about to reveal an all-new iMac, fully redesigned and ready for the future. The new iMac supposedly takes its cues from the Pro Display XDR or iPad Pro, with thin bezels and and squared-off flat edges.