US history

Timeline created by vicky4378
  • 1,937 BCE

    Rape of Nanjing

    Rape of Nanjing
    The Nanking Massacre was an episode of mass murder and mass rape committed by Japanese troops against the residents of Nanjing (Nanking), then the capital of the Republic of China, during the Second Sino-Japanese War. The massacre is also known as the Rape of Nanking or, using Pinyin romanization, the Nanjing Massacre or Rape of Nanjing.
  • Homestead act

    Homestead act
    Signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on May 20, 1862, the Homestead Act encouraged Western migration by providing settlers 160 acres of public land. In exchange, homesteaders paid a small filing fee and were required to complete five years of continuous residence before receiving ownership of the land
  • 13th Amendment

    13th Amendment
    The text of the 13th Amendment: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. ... Finally, the 13th Amendment was passed by the Congress on January 31, 1865.
  • 14th Amendment

    14th Amendment
    The Fourteenth Amendment (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments. The amendment addresses citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws and was proposed in response to issues related to former slaves following the American Civil War.
  • transcontinental rail road completed

    transcontinental rail road completed
    On May 10, 1869, a golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, signaling the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in the United States. The transcontinental railroad had long been a dream for people living in the American West
  • industrialization begins to boom

    industrialization begins to boom
    manufacturing was often done in people’s homes, using hand tools or basic machines. Industrialization marked a shift to power, special-purpose machinery, factories and mass production. The iron and textile industries, along with the development of the steam engine, played central roles in the Industrial Revolution, which also saw improved systems of transportation, communication and banking.
  • Imperialism

    Their influence, however, was limited. In the Age of New Imperialism that began in the 1870s, European states established vast empires mainly in Africa, but also in Asia and the Middle East. ... Imperialism had consequences that affected the colonial nations, Europe, and the world.
  • 15th Amendment

    15th Amendment
    The Fourteenth Amendment (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments. The amendment addresses citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws and was proposed in response to issues related to former slaves following the American Civil War.
  • telephone invented

    telephone invented
    Alexander Graham Bell (March 3, 1847 – August 2, 1922) was a Scottish-born scientist, inventor, engineer, and innovator who is credited with patenting the first practical telephone and founding the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) in 1885.
  • reconstruction ends

    reconstruction ends
    With the compromise, the Republicans had quietly given up their fight for racial equality and blacks' rights in the south. In 1877, Hayes withdrew the last federal troops from the south, and the bayonet-backed Republican governments collapsed, thereby ending Reconstruction
  • Jim Crow Laws Start in South

    Jim Crow Laws Start in South
    Jim Crow law, in U.S. history, any of the laws that enforced racial segregation in the South between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the beginning of the civil rights movement in the 1950s.
  • light bulbs invented

    light bulbs invented
    Incandescent Bulbs Light the Way. Long before Thomas Edison patented -- first in 1879 and then a year later in 1880 -- and began commercializing his incandescent light bulb, British inventors were demonstrating that electric light was possible with the arc lamp
  • third wave of immigration

    third wave of immigration
    Third-wave European immigration was slowed first by World War I and then by numerical quotas in the 1920s. Between the 1920s and 1960s, immigration paused. Immigration was low during the Depression of the 1930s, and in some years more people left the United States than arrived.
  • chinese exclusion act

    chinese exclusion act
    It was the first significant law restricting immigration into the United States. In the spring of 1882, the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed by Congress. This act provided an absolute 10-year moratorium on Chinese labor immigration, but was renewed in 1892 and made permanent in 1902.
    As gold became harder to find and competition increased, animosity toward the Chinese and other foreigners increased. After being forcibly driven from the mines, most Chinese immigrated to the u.s.
  • pendleton act

    pendleton act
    The Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act is a United States federal law, enacted in 1883, which established that positions within the federal government should be awarded on the basis of merit instead of political affiliation.
  • Dawes Act

    Dawes Act
    The Dawes Act of 1887 (also known as the General Allotment Act or the Dawes Severalty Act of 1887),[1][2] adopted by Congress in 1887, authorized the President of the United States to survey American Indian tribal land and divide it into allotments for individual Indians. Those who accepted allotments and lived separately from the tribe would be granted United States citizenship.
  • interstate commerce act

    interstate commerce act
    The Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 is a United States federal law that was designed to regulate the railroad industry, particularly its monopolistic practices. The Act required that railroad rates be "reasonable and just," but did not empower the government to fix specific rates.
  • Chicago's Hull House

    Chicago's Hull House
    Hull House was a settlement house in the United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. Located in the Near West Side of Chicago, Illinois, Hull House (named after the home's first owner Charles Jerald Hull) opened to recently arrived European immigrants
  • klondlike gold rush

    klondlike gold rush
    Klondike gold rush definition. A rush of thousands of people in the 1890s toward the Klondike gold mining district in northwestern Canada after gold was discovered there.
  • Sheerman Anti-Trust act

    Sheerman Anti-Trust act
    Sherman Anti-Trust Act (1890) ... Approved July 2, 1890, The Sherman Anti-Trust Act was the first Federal act that outlawed monopolistic business practices. The Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 was the first measure passed by the U.S. Congress to prohibit trusts.
  • How the Other Half Lives

    How the Other Half Lives
    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) was an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis, documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s.
  • homestead steel labor strike

    homestead steel labor strike
    The Homestead strike, in Homestead, Pennsylvania, pitted one of the most powerful new corporations, Carnegie Steel Company, against the nation's strongest trade union, the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers.
  • pullman labor strike

    pullman labor strike
    The Pullman Strike was a nationwide railroad strike in the United States on May 11, 1894, and a turning point for US labor law. It pitted the American Railway Union (ARUM) against the Pullman Company, the main railroads, and the federal government of the United States under President Grover Cleveland.
  • Plessy v. Ferguson

    Plessy v. Ferguson
    Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896), was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court issued in 1896. It upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality, a doctrine that came to be known as "separate but equal".
  • Assassination of President Mckinley

    Assassination of President Mckinley
    On September 6, 1901, William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States, was shot on the grounds of the Pan-American Exposition at the Temple of Music in Buffalo, New York. He was shaking hands with the public when Leon Czolgosz, an anarchist, shot him twice in the abdomen.
  • Wright Brother’s Airplane

    Wright Brother’s Airplane
    Wright brothers definition. Orville and Wilbur Wright, American mechanics and inventors of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, who achieved the first sustained flight of a heavier-than-air machine — what we today call an airplane. Their flight was made at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, in 1903.
  • The junle

    The junle
    His main goal in exposing the meat industry and working conditions was to advance Socialism in the United States. However, most readers were more concerned with his exposure of health violations and unsanitary practices in the American meatpacking industry during the early 20th century, greatly contributing to a public outcry which led to reforms including the Meat Inspection Act
  • Pure Food and Drug Act

    Pure Food and Drug Act
    Pure Food and Drug Act (1906) For preventing the manufacture, sale, or transportation of adulterated or misbranded or poisonous or deleterious foods, drugs, medicines, and liquors, and for regulating traffic therein, and for other purposes.
  • Model T

    Model T
    an automobile with a 2.9-liter, 4-cylinder engine, produced by the Ford Motor Company from 1909 through 1927, considered to be the first motor vehicle successfully mass-produced on an assembly line. Examples from the Web for Model T.

    The NAACP, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, is a civil rights organization founded in 1909 to fight prejudice, lynching, and Jim Crow segregation, and to work for the betterment of "people of color."
  • 16th Amendment

    16th Amendment
    The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration
  • Federal Reserve Act

    Federal Reserve Act
    The 1913 Federal Reserve Act was a U.S. legislation that created the current Federal Reserve System. The Federal Reserve Act intended to establish a form of economic stability in the United States through the introduction of the Central Bank, which would be in charge of monetary policy.
  • 17th Amendment

    17th Amendment
    The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State legislatures.
  • Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

    Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
    The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, occurred on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo when they were mortally wounded by Gavrilo Princip.
  • Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machinery Guns

    Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machinery Guns
    Although the use of toxic chemicals as weapons dates back thousands of years, the first large scale use of chemical weapons was during World War 1.They were primarily used to demoralize, injure, and kill entrenched defenders, against whom the indiscriminate and generally very slow-moving. The types of weapons employed ranged from disabling chemicals, chlorine, and mustard gas. Gas was unlike most other weapons of the period because it was possible to develop effective countermeasures,
  • Sinking of Lusitania

    Sinking of Lusitania
    The sinking of the Cunard ocean liner RMS Lusitania occurred on Friday, 7 May 1915 during the First World War, as Germany waged submarine warfare against the United Kingdom. The ship was identified and torpedoed by the German U-boat U-20 and sank in 18 minutes. The vessel went down 11 miles, killing 1,198 and leaving 761 survivors. The sinking turned public opinion in many countries against Germany, contributed to the American entry into World War I.
  • National Parks System

    National Parks System
    The National Park Service (NPS) is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.
  • Zimmerman Telegram

    Zimmerman Telegram
  • 18th Amendment

    18th Amendment
    The Eighteenth Amendment (Amendment XVIII) of the United States Constitution effectively established the prohibition of alcoholic beverages in the United States by declaring the production, transport, and sale of alcohol (though not the consumption or private possession) illegal.
  • 19th Amendment

    19th Amendment
    The Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was adopted on August 18, 1920.
  • President Harding's Return to Normacy

    President Harding's Return to Normacy
    Return to normalcy, a return to the way of life before World War I, was United States presidential candidate Warren G. Harding's campaign promise in the election of 1920.
  • Harlem Renaissance

    Harlem Renaissance
    The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s. During the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement", named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke.
  • Red Scare

    Red Scare
    As the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States intensified in the late 1940s and early 1950s, hysteria over the perceived threat posed by Communists in the U.S. became known as the Red Scare. (Communists were often referred to as “Reds” for their allegiance to the red Soviet flag.)
  • Teapot Dome Scandal

    Teapot Dome Scandal
    In a government scandal involving a former United States Navy oil reserve in Wyoming that was secretly leased to a private oil company in 1921; became symbolic of the scandals of the Harding administration. Synonyms: Teapot Dome Example of: outrage, scandal. a disgraceful event.
  • Joseph Stalin Leads USSR

    Joseph Stalin Leads USSR
  • Scopes "Monkey" Trial

    Scopes "Monkey" Trial
    The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in July 1925 in which a substitute high school teacher, John T. Scopes, was accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which had made it unlawful to teach human evolution.
  • Mein Kampf published

    Mein Kampf published
    Mein Kampf is a 1925 autobiographical book by Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler. The work describes the process by which Hitler became antisemitic and outlines his political ideology and future plans for Germany. Volume 1 of Mein Kampf was published in 1925 and Volume 2 in 1926.
  • Charles Lindbergh's Trans-Atlantic Flight

    Charles Lindbergh's Trans-Atlantic Flight
    5:22pm - The Spirit of St. Louis touches down at the Le Bourget Aerodrome, Paris, France. Local time: 10:22pm. Total flight time: 33 hours, 30 minutes, 29.8 seconds. Charles Lindbergh had not slept in 55 hours
  • St. Valentine's Day Massacre

    St. Valentine's Day Massacre
    The Saint Valentine's Day Massacre is the name given to the 1929 murder in Chicago of seven men of the North Side gang during the Prohibition Era.
  • Stock Market Crashes "Black Tuesday"

    Stock Market Crashes "Black Tuesday"
    The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday (October 29), the Great Crash, or the Stock Market Crash of 1929, began on October 24, 1929 ("Black Thursday"), and was the most devastating stock market crash in the history of the United States (acting as the most significant predicting indicator of the Great
  • Hoovervilles

    A "Hooverville" was a shanty town built during the Great Depression by the homeless in the United States of America. They were named after Herbert Hoover, who was President of the United States of America during the onset of the Depression and was widely blamed for it.
  • Smoot-Hawley Tariff (

    Smoot-Hawley Tariff (
    otherwise known as the Smoot–Hawley Tariff or Hawley–Smoot Tariff, was an act implementing protectionist trade policies sponsored by Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis C. Hawley and signed into law on June 17, 1930. The act raised U.S. tariffs on over 20,000 imported goods.
  • 100, 000 Banks Have Failed

    100, 000 Banks Have Failed
    In the 1920s, Nebraska and the nation as a whole had a lot of banks. At the beginning of the 20s, Nebraska had 1.3 million people and there was one bank for every 1,000 people. Every small town had a bank or two struggling to take in deposits and loan out money to farmers and businesses.
    As the economic depression deepened in the early 30s, and as farmers had less and less money to spend in town, banks began to fail at alarming rates.
  • Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany

    Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany
    President Paul von Hindenburg had already appointed Hitler as Chancellor on 30 January 1933 after a series of parliamentary elections and associated backroom intrigues. ... Adolf Hitler rose to a place of prominence in the early years of the party.
  • Dust Bowl

    Dust Bowl
    The Dust Bowl, also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the American and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought and a failure to apply dryland farming methods to prevent wind erosion (the Aeolian processes) caused the phenomenon.
  • Kristallnacht

    Also known as The Night of the Broken Glass. On this night, November 9, 1938, almost 200 synagogues were destroyed, over 8,000 Jewish shops were sacked and looted, and tens of thousands of Jews were removed to concentration camps.
  • Hitler invades Poland

    Hitler invades Poland
    The Invasion of Poland, known in Poland as the September Campaign (Kampania wrześniowa) or the 1939 Defensive War (Wojna obronna 1939 roku), and in Germany as the Poland Campaign (Polenfeldzug) or Fall Weiss ("Case White"), was a joint invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, the Free City of Danzig
  • German Blitzkrieg attacks

    German Blitzkrieg attacks
    Germany quickly overran much of Europe and was victorious for more than two years by relying on a new military tactic called the "Blitzkrieg" (lightning war). Blitzkrieg tactics required the concentration of offensive weapons (such as tanks, planes, and artillery) along a narrow front
  • Pearl Harbor

    Pearl Harbor
    A major United States naval base in Hawaii that was attacked without warning by the Japanese air force on December 7, 1941, with great loss of American lives and ships.
  • Navajo Code Talkers

    Navajo Code Talkers
    The name code talkers is strongly associated with bilingual Navajo speakers specially recruited during World War II by the Marines to serve in their standard communications units in the Pacific Theater.
  • Tuskegee Airmen

    Tuskegee Airmen
    The Tuskegee Airmen /tʌsˈkiːɡiː/ is the popular name of a group of African-American military pilots (fighter and bomber) who fought in World War II. Officially, they formed the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group of the United States Army Air Forces.
  • Executive Order 9066

    Executive Order 9066
    Executive Order 9066 was a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942
  • Bataan Death March

    Bataan Death March
    The Bataan Death March was the forcible transfer by the Imperial Japanese Army of 60,000–80,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war from Saysain Point, Bagac, Bataan and Mariveles to Camp O'Donnell, Capas, Tarlac, via San Fernando, Pampanga, where the prisoners were loaded onto trains.
  • GI Bill

    GI Bill
    GI Bill definition. A law passed in 1944 that provided educational and other benefits for people who had served in the armed forces in World War II. Benefits are still available to persons honorably discharged from the armed forces.
  • United Nations Formed

    United Nations Formed
    A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was established on 24 October 1945 after World War II with the aim of preventing another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193.
  • Germany Divided

    Germany Divided
    A republic in central Europe: after World War II divided into four zones, British, French, U.S., and Soviet, and in 1949 into East Germany and West Germany; East and West Germany were reunited in 1990. 137,852 sq. mi. (357,039 sq. km).
  • Truman Docrine

    Truman Docrine
    the principle that the US should give support to countries or peoples threatened by Soviet forces or communist insurrection. First expressed in 1947 by US President Truman in a speech to Congress seeking aid for Greece and Turkey, the doctrine was seen by the communists as an open declaration of the Cold War.
  • Mao Zedong Established Communist Rule in China

    Mao Zedong Established Communist Rule in China
    Mao Zedong (December 26, 1893 – September 9, 1976), commonly known as Chairman Mao, was a Chinese communist revolutionary, poet, political theorist and founding father of the People's Republic of China, which he ruled as the Chairman of the Communist Party of China from its establishment in 1949 until his death in 1976
  • 22nd Amendment

    22nd Amendment
    The Twenty-second Amendment of the United States Constitution limits the number of times one can be elected to the office of President of the United States. Wikipedia
  • Marshall Plan

    Marshall Plan
    Marshall Plan definition. A program by which the United States gave large amounts of economic aid to European countries to help them rebuild after the devastation of World War II. It was proposed by the United States secretary of state, General George C. Marshall.
  • Berlin Airlift

    Berlin Airlift
    Berlin airlift definition. A military operation in the late 1940s that brought food and other needed goods into West Berlin by air after the government of East Germany, which at that time surrounded West Berlin ( see Berlin wall ), had cut off its supply routes.
  • Arab-Israeli War Begins

    Arab-Israeli War Begins
    The Arab-Israeli War of 1948. ... The United Nations resolution sparked conflict between Jewish and Arab groups within Palestine. Fighting began with attacks by irregular bands of Palestinian Arabs attached to local units of the Arab Liberation Army composed of volunteers from Palestine and neighboring Arab countries.
  • NATO Formed

    NATO Formed
    an organization formed in Washington, D.C. (1949), comprising the 12 nations of the Atlantic Pact together with Greece, Turkey, and the Federal Republic of Germany, for the purpose of collective defense against aggression. Origin of NATO.
  • Kim Il-sung invades South Korea

    Kim Il-sung invades South Korea
    He became the first premier of the newly formed Democratic People's Republic of Korea in 1948, and in 1949 he became chairman of the Korean Workers' (communist) Party. Hoping to reunify Korea by force, Kim launched an invasion of South Korea in 1950, thereby igniting the Korean War.
  • UN forces push North Korea to Yalu River- the border with China

    UN forces push North Korea to Yalu River- the border with China
    The Yalu River, also called the Amnok River (Korean pronunciation: [amnok.k͈aŋ]), is a river on the border between North Korea and China. Together with the Tumen River to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea and China and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War.
  • Chinese forces cross Yalu and enter Korean War

    Chinese forces cross Yalu and enter Korean War
    On 27 June, the United Nations Security Council authorized the formation and dispatch of UN forces to Korea to repel what was recognized as a North Korean invasion. ... UN forces rapidly approached the Yalu River—the border with China—but in October 1950, mass Chinese forces crossed the Yalu and entered the war.
  • Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution

    Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution
    Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, a married couple convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage in 1951, are put to death in the electric chair. ... Specifically, they were accused of heading a spy ring that passed top-secret information concerning the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union
  • Armistice Signed

    Armistice Signed
    noun. a temporary suspension of hostilities by agreement of the warring parties; truce: World War I ended with the armistice of 1918. Origin of armistice.
  • Hernandez v. Texas

    Hernandez v. Texas
    Hernandez v. Texas, 347 U.S. 475 (1954) was a landmark case, "the first and only Mexican-American civil-rights case heard and decided by the United States Supreme Court during the post-World War II period."
  • Brown v. Board of Education

    Brown v. Board of Education
    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional.
  • Ho Chi Minh Established Communist Rule in Vietnam

    Ho Chi Minh Established Communist Rule in Vietnam
    Hồ Chí Minh led the Việt Minh independence movement from 1941 onward, establishing the Communist-ruled Democratic Republic of Vietnam in 1945 and defeating the French Union in 1954 at the battle of Điện Biên Phủ. He officially stepped down from power in 1965 due to health problems.
  • Warsaw Pact Formed

    Warsaw Pact Formed
    noun. an organization formed in Warsaw, Poland (1955), comprising Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and the U.S.S.R., for collective defense under a joint military command. Expand. Also called Warsaw Pact. Compare NATO.
  • Polio Vaccine

    Polio Vaccine
    Medical Definition of Polio vaccine, inactivated. Polio vaccine, inactivated: A vaccine that is made from a suspension of poliovirus types that are inactivated (killed) with formalin. Abbreviated IPV. IPV is given by injection.
  • Rosa Parks Arrested

    Rosa Parks Arrested
    Arrest report for Rosa Parks. On 1 December 1955, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. This single act of nonviolent resistance sparked the Montgomery bus boycott, an eleven-month struggle to desegregate the city's buses.
  • Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Montgomery Bus Boycott
    The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a political and social protest campaign against the policy of racial segregation on the public transit system of Montgomery, Alabama. It was a seminal event in the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Interstate Highway Act

    Interstate Highway Act
    The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956, popularly known as the National Interstate and Defense Highways Act (Public Law 84-627), was enacted on June 29, 1956, when President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the bill into law.
  • Elvis Presley First Hit Song

    Elvis Presley First Hit Song
    February 1956. As "Heartbreak Hotel" makes its climb up the charts on its way to #1, "I Forgot to Remember to Forget" b/w "Mystery Train," Elvis' fifth and last single to be released on the Sun label, hits #1 on Billboard's national country singles chart. His first #1 hit on a national chart
  • Sputnik I

    Sputnik I
    each of a series of Soviet artificial satellites, the first of which (launched on October 4, 1957) was the first satellite to be placed in orbit.
  • Leave it to Beaver First Airs on Tv

    Leave it to Beaver First Airs on Tv
    Leave It to Beaver is an American television sitcom about an inquisitive and often naïve boy, Theodore "The Beaver" Cleaver and his adventures at home, in school, and around his suburban neighborhood.. The show has attained an iconic status in the United States, with the Cleavers exemplifying the idealized suburban family of the mid-20th century
  • Civil Rights Act of 1957

    Civil Rights Act of 1957
    The Civil Rights Act of 1957, Pub.L. 85–315, 71 Stat. 634, enacted September 9, 1957, a federal voting rights bill, was the first federal civil rights legislation passed by the United States Congress since the Civil Rights Act of 1875.
  • Little Rock Nine

    Little Rock Nine
    The Little Rock Nine was a group of nine African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. Their enrollment was followed by the Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Orval Faubus, the Governor of Arkansas.
  • Kennedy versus Nixon TV Debate

    Kennedy versus Nixon TV Debate
    On this day in 1960, Massachusetts Democratic Senator John F. Kennedy and Republican Vice President Richard M. Nixon face each other in a nationally televised presidential campaign debate.
  • Chicano Mural Movement Begins

    Chicano Mural Movement Begins
    Chicano Mural Movement. Definition. The Chicano mural movement began in the 1960s in Mexican-American barrios throughout the Southwest. Artists began using the walls of city buildings, housing projects, schools, and churches to depict Mexican-American culture. Pictures.Mar 3, 2014
  • Mapp v. Ohio

    Mapp v. Ohio
    Mapp v. Ohio, 367 U.S. 643 (1961), was a landmark case in criminal procedure, in which the United States Supreme Court decided that evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment, which protects against "unreasonable searches and seizures," may not be used in state law criminal prosecutions in state courts, as ...
  • Affirmative Action

    Affirmative Action
    an action or policy favoring those who tend to suffer from discrimination, especially in relation to employment or education; positive discrimination.
  • Sam Walton Opens First Walmart

    Sam Walton Opens First Walmart
    On July 2, 1962, Sam Walton opens the first Walmart store in Rogers, Arkansas. The Walton family owns 24 stores, ringing up $12.7 million in sales. The company officially incorporates as Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
  • Gideon v. Wainwright

    Gideon v. Wainwright
    The Sixth Amendment right to counsel is a fundamental right applied to the states via the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution's due process clause, and requires that indigent criminal defendants be provided counsel at trial. Supreme Court of Florida reversed.
  • George Wallace Blocks University of Alabama Entrance

    George Wallace Blocks University of Alabama Entrance
    The Stand in the Schoolhouse Door took place at Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963. George Wallace, the Democratic Governor of Alabama, in a symbolic attempt to keep his inaugural promise of "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" and stop the desegregation of schools, stood at the door of the auditorium to try to block the entry of two African American students, Vivian Malone and James Hood
  • The Feminine Mystique

    The Feminine Mystique
    The Feminine Mystique is a book written by Betty Friedan which is widely credited with sparking the beginning of second-wave feminism in the United States. It was published on February 19, 1963 by W. W. Norton.
  • March on Washington

    March on Washington
    March on Washington, in full March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, political demonstration held in Washington, D.C., in 1963 by civil rights leaders to protest racial discrimination and to show support for major civil rights legislation that was pending in Congress.
  • Escobedo v. Illinois

    Escobedo v. Illinois
    378 U.S. 478 (1964), was a United States Supreme Court case holding that criminal suspects have a right to counsel during police interrogations under the Sixth Amendment.
  • Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

    Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
    The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution or the Southeast Asia Resolution, Pub.L. 88–408, 78 Stat. 384, enacted August 10, 1964, was a joint resolution that the United States Congress passed on August 7, 1964, in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident.
  • Civil Rights Act of 1964

    Civil Rights Act of 1964
    The Civil Rights Act of 1964, which ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, is considered one of the crowning legislative achievements of the civil rights movement.
  • 24th Amendment

    24th Amendment
    The 24th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America abolished the poll tax for all federal elections. A poll tax was a tax of anywhere from one to a few dollars that had to be paid annually by each voter in order to be able to cast a vote.
  • Israeli-Palestine Conflict Begins

    Israeli-Palestine Conflict Begins
    The history of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict began with the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948. This conflict came from the intercommunal violence in Mandatory Palestine between Israelis and Arabs from 1920 and erupted into full-scale hostilities in the 1947–48 civil war.
  • Voting Rights Act of 1965

    Voting Rights Act of 1965
    A law passed at the time of the civil rights movement. It eliminated various devices, such as literacy tests, that had traditionally been used to restrict voting by black people.
  • Malcom X Assassinated

    Malcom X Assassinated
    Malcolm X (1925–1965) was an African-American Muslim minister and human rights activist. To his admirers he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans; detractors accused him of preaching racism and violence. He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African Americans in history.
  • United Farm Worker’s California Delano Grape Strike

    United Farm Worker’s California Delano Grape Strike
    The Delano grape strike was a labor strike by the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee and the United Farm Workers against grape growers in California. The strike began on September 8, 1965, and lasted more than five years. Due largely to a consumer boycott of non-union grapes, the strike ended with a significant victory for the United Farm Workers as well as its first contract with the growers.
  • Miranda v. Arizona

    Miranda v. Arizona
    The Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination requires law enforcement officials to advise a suspect interrogated in custody of his or her rights to remain silent and to obtain an attorney. Supreme Court of Arizona reversed and remanded.
  • Thurgood Marshall Appointed to Supreme Court

    Thurgood Marshall Appointed to Supreme Court
    President Lyndon Johnson appoints U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Thurgood Marshall to fill the seat of retiring Supreme Court Associate Justice Tom C. Clark. On August 30, after a heated debate, the Senate confirmed Marshall's nomination by a vote of 69 to 11.
  • Six Day War

    Six Day War
    The Six-Day War, also known as the June War, 1967 Arab–Israeli War, or Third Arab–Israeli War, was fought between June 5 and 10, 1967 by Israel and the neighboring states of Egypt, Jordan, and Syria.
  • Tet Offensive

    Tet Offensive
    A series of major attacks by communist forces in the Vietnam War. Early in 1968, Vietnamese communist troops seized and briefly held some major cities at the time of the lunar new year, or Tet.
  • My Lai Massacre

    My Lai Massacre
    my lai massacre. my lai massacre in Culture. My Lai massacre [( mee leye)] A mass killing of helpless inhabitants of a village in South Vietnam during the Vietnam War, carried out in 1968 by United States troops under the command of Lieutenant William Calley.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Assassinated

    Martin Luther King Jr. Assassinated
    Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr., American clergyman and civil rights leader, was fatally shot at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968. He was rushed to St. Joseph's Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 7:05 p.m. CST.
  • Tinker v. Des Moines

    Tinker v. Des Moines
    Independent Community School District, 393 U.S. 503 (1969), was a decision by the United States Supreme Court that defined the constitutional rights of students in U.S. public schools.
  • Vietnamization

    (in the Vietnam War) the US policy of withdrawing its troops and transferring the responsibility and direction of the war effort to the government of South Vietnam.
  • Woodstock Music Festival

    Woodstock Music Festival
    The Woodstock Music & Art Fair—informally, the Woodstock Festival or simply Woodstock— was a music festival in the United States in 1969 which attracted an audience of more than 400,000.
  • Draft Lottery

    Draft Lottery
    On December 1, 1969, the Selective Service System of the United States conducted two lotteries to determine the order of call to military service in the Vietnam War for men born from 1944 to 1950
  • Manson Family Murders

    Manson Family Murders
    The Manson Family was a commune established in California in the late 1960s, led by Charles Manson. They gained national notoriety after the murder of actress Sharon Tate and four others on August 9, 1969 by Tex Watson and three other members of the Family, acting under the instructions of Charles Manson.
  • Apollo 11

    Apollo 11
    The space vehicle that carried three American astronauts to the moon and back in July 1969. The vehicle consisted of a command module, which stayed in lunar orbit, and a lunar module, which carried two of the three crewmen to a safe landing on the moon.
  • Invasion of Cambodia

    Invasion of Cambodia
    In March 1969, President Richard Nixon authorized secret bombing raids in Cambodia, a move that escalated opposition to the Vietnam War in Ohio and across the United States. Nixon believed North Vietnam was transporting troops and supplies through neighboring Cambodia into South Vietnam.
  • Kent State Shootings

    Kent State Shootings
    A controversial incident in 1970, in which unarmed students demonstrating against United States involvement in the Vietnam War were fired on by panicky troops of the National Guard. Four students were killed and nine wounded. The shooting occurred at Kent State University in Ohio.
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established in December 1970 under United States President Richard Nixon. The EPA is an agency of the United States federal government whose mission is to protect human and environmental health.
  • Pentagon Papers

    Pentagon Papers
    A classified study of the Vietnam War that was carried out by the Department of Defense. An official of the department, Daniel Ellsberg, gave copies of the study in 1971 to the New York Times and Washington Post.
  • 26th Amendment

    26th Amendment
    “Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age. Section 2. “The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” The 26th Amendment Defined.
  • Policy of Détente Begins

    Policy of Détente Begins
    Détente (a French word meaning release from tension) is the name given to a period of improved relations between the United States and the Soviet Union that began tentatively in 1971 and took decisive form when President Richard M. Nixon visited the secretary-general of the Soviet Communist party, Leonid I. Brezhnev, ...
  • Title IX

    Title IX
    Title IX Defined. No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. (Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.
  • Nixon Visits China

    Nixon Visits China
    U.S. President Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China (officially the People's Republic of China or PRC) was an important strategic and diplomatic overture that marked the culmination of the Nixon administration's resumption of harmonious relations between the United States and China.
  • Watergate Scandal

    Watergate Scandal
    The Watergate scandal was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States during the early 1970s, following a break-in by five men at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. on June 17, 1972, and President Richard Nixon's administration's subsequent attempt to cover up its involvement. After the five burglars were caught and the conspiracy was discovered, Watergate was investigated by the United States Congress
  • War Powers Resolution

    War Powers Resolution
    The War Powers Resolution (also known as the War Powers Resolution of 1973 or the War Powers Act) (50 U.S.C. 1541–1548) is a federal law intended to check the president's power to commit the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of the U.S. Congress.
  • Roe v. Wade

    Roe v. Wade
    The Supreme Court case that held that the Constitution protected a woman's right to an abortion prior to the viability of the fetus.
  • Engaged Species Act

    Engaged Species Act
    The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was signed on December 28, 1973, and provides for the conservation of species that are endangered or threatened throughout all or a significant portion of their range, and the conservation of the ecosystems on which they depend.
  • OPEC Oil Embargo

    OPEC Oil Embargo
    Oil Embargo, 1973–1974. During the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, Arab members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) imposed an embargo against the United States in retaliation for the U.S. decision to re-supply the Israeli military and to gain leverage in the post-war peace negotiations.
  • First Cell-Phones

    First Cell-Phones
    Motorola was the first company to produce a handheld mobile phone. On April 3, 1973, Martin Cooper, a Motorola researcher and executive, made the first mobile telephone call from handheld subscriber equipment, placing a call to Dr. Joel S. Engel of Bell Labs, his rival.
  • United States v. Nixon

    United States v. Nixon
    United States v. Nixon, 418 U.S. 683 (1974), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case which resulted in a unanimous decision against President Richard Nixon, ordering him to deliver tape recordings and other subpoenaed materials to a federal district court.
  • Ford Pardons Nixon

    Ford Pardons Nixon
    A presidential pardon of Richard Nixon (Proclamation 4311) was issued on September 8, 1974, by President Gerald Ford, which granted his predecessor Richard Nixon a full and unconditional pardon for any crimes he might have committed against the United States while president.
  • Bill Gates Microsoft

    Bill Gates Microsoft
    Bill Gates is the co-founder of Microsoft Corporation and one of the world's richest men. Through Microsoft, Gates helped spur the rise of the personal computer by providing an operating system that could run on a variety of machines.
  • National Rifle Associates (NRA) Lobbying Begins

    National Rifle Associates (NRA) Lobbying Begins
    Founded in 1871, the group has informed its members about firearm-related bills since 1934, and it has directly lobbied for and against legislation since 1975.It has been called "the oldest continuously operating civil liberties organization" and "one of the largest and best-funded lobbying organizations" in the United States.Founded to advance rifle marksmanship, the modern NRA continues to teach firearm competency and safety.
  • Steve Jobs Starts Apple

    Steve Jobs Starts Apple
    In 1975, the 20-year-old Jobs and Wozniak set up shop in Jobs' parents' garage, dubbed the venture Apple, and began working on the prototype of the Apple I. To generate the $1,350 in capital they used to start Apple, Steve Jobs sold his Volkswagen microbus, and Steve Wozniak sold his Hewlett-Packard calculator.
  • Community Reinvestment Act of 1977

    Community Reinvestment Act of 1977
    The Community Reinvestment Act is intended to encourage depository institutions to help meet the credit needs of the communities in which they operate, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, consistent with safe and sound operations. ... Comments will be taken into consideration during the next CRA examination.Feb 11, 2014
  • Camp David Accords

    Camp David Accords
    a peace treaty between Israel and Egypt issuing from talks at Camp David between Egyptian President Sadat, Israeli Prime Minister Begin, and the host, U.S. President Carter: signed in 1979. Examples from the Web for Camp David Accords.
  • Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty

    Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty
    False peace will not last". On the other hand, the treaty led both Egyptian president Anwar Sadat and Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin to share the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize for bringing peace between the two states.
  • Conservative Resurgence

    Conservative Resurgence
    Its initiators called it the Conservative Resurgence while its detractors labeled it the Fundamentalist Takeover. It was launched with the charge that the seminaries and denominational agencies were dominated by liberals.
  • "Trickle Down Economics"

    "Trickle Down Economics"
    Trickle-down economics, also referred to as trickle-down theory, is an economic theory that advocates reducing taxes on businesses and the wealthy in society as a means to stimulate business investment in the short term and benefit society at large in the long term.
  • War on Drugs

    War on Drugs
    War on Drugs is an American term usually applied to the U.S. federal government's campaign of prohibition of drugs, military aid, and military intervention, with the stated aim being to reduce the illegal drug trade.
  • AIDS Epidemic

    AIDS Epidemic
    HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic. As of 2016, approximately 36.7 million people are living with HIV globally. In 2016, approximately half are men and half are women. There were about 1.0 million deaths from AIDS in 2016, down from 1.9 million in 2005. Wikipedia
  • Sandra Day O'Connor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court

    Sandra Day O'Connor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court
    Sandra Day O'Connor (born March 26, 1930) is a retired Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving from her appointment in 1981 by Ronald Reagan to 2006. She was the first woman to serve on the Court.
  • Marines in Lebanon

    Marines in Lebanon
    Facts: October 23, 1983 - 241 US service personnel -- including 220 Marines and 21 other service personnel -- are killed by a truck bomb at a Marine compound in Beirut, Lebanon. Three hundred service members had been living at the four-story building at the airport in Beirut.Oct 18, 2017
  • Iran-Contra Affair

    Iran-Contra Affair
    the Iran–Contra scandal, was a political scandal in the United States that occurred during the second term of the Reagan Administration. Senior administration officials secretly facilitated the sale of arms to Iran, which was the subject of an arms embargo.They hoped, thereby, to fund the Contras in Nicaragua while at the same time negotiating the release of several U.S. hostages.
  • The Oprah Winfrey Show First Airs

    The Oprah Winfrey Show First Airs
    The Oprah Winfrey Show, often referred to simply as Oprah, is an American syndicated talk show that aired nationally for 25 seasons from September 8, 1986 to May 25, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois.
  • "Mr. Gorbachev, Tear Down This Wall!"

    "Mr. Gorbachev, Tear Down This Wall!"
    The "tear down this wall" speech was not the first time Reagan had addressed the issue of the Berlin Wall: in a visit to West Berlin in June 1982, he'd stated "I'd like to ask the Soviet leaders one question [...] Why is the wall there?",[2] and in 1986, 25 years after the construction of the wall, in response to West German newspaper Bild-Zeitung asking when he thought the wall could be "torn down", Reagan said, "I call upon those responsible to dismantle it [today]"
  • End of Cold War

    End of Cold War
    The End of the Cold War. ... The end of the Cold War. When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the reins of power in the Soviet Union in 1985, no one predicted the revolution he would bring. A dedicated reformer, Gorbachev introduced the policies of glasnost and perestroika to the USSR.
  • Berlin Wall Falls

    Berlin Wall Falls
    The Berlin Wall: The Fall of the Wall. On November 9, 1989, as the Cold War began to thaw across Eastern Europe, the spokesman for East Berlin's Communist Party announced a change in his city's relations with the West. Starting at midnight that day, he said, citizens of the GDR were free to cross the country's borders.
  • Germany Reunification

    Germany Reunification
    The German reunification (German: Deutsche Wiedervereinigung) was the process in 1990 in which the German Democratic Republic (GDR (German: DDR)/East Germany) became part of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG (German: BRD)/West Germany) to form the reunited nation of Germany, and when Berlin reunited into a single city, as provided by its then Grundgesetz constitution Article 23.
  • Iraq Invades Kuwait

    Iraq Invades Kuwait
    The Invasion of Kuwait on 2 August 1990 was a 2-day operation conducted by Iraq against the neighboring state of Kuwait, which resulted in the seven-month-long Iraqi occupation of the country.
  • Soviet Union Collapses

    Soviet Union Collapses
    The dissolution of the Soviet Union[a] occurred on December 26, 1991, officially granting self-governing independence to the Republics of the Soviet Union. It was a result of the declaration number 142-Н of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union.[1] The declaration acknowledged the independence of the former Soviet republics and created the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), although five of the signatories ratified it much later or did not do so at all.
  • Operation Dessert Storm

    Operation Dessert Storm
    The Gulf War, codenamed Operation Desert Shield for operations leading to the buildup of troops and defense of Saudi Arabia and Operation Desert Storm in its combat phase, was a war waged by coalition
  • Ms. Adcox Born

    Ms. Adcox Born
    Born in El Paso, Texas. Teacher at Jones Futures Academy
  • Rodney King

    Rodney King
    Rodney Glen King (April 2, 1965 – June 17, 2012) was an African-American taxi driver who became known internationally as the victim of Los Angeles Police Department brutality, after a videotape was released of several police officers beating him during his arrest on March 3, 1991.
  • NAFTA Founded

    NAFTA Founded
    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico, and the United States and entered into force on 1 January 1994 in order to establish a trilateral trade bloc in North America.
  • Contract with America

    Contract with America
    Contract with America. Contract with America, a document signed Sept. 27, 1994, on the Capitol steps in Washington, D.C., by members of the Republican minority before the Republican Party gained control of Congress in 1994.
  • O.J Simpson's "Trial of the Century"

    O.J Simpson's "Trial of the Century"
    The O. J. Simpson murder case was a criminal trial held at the Los Angeles County Superior Court in which former National Football League (NFL) player, broadcaster, and actor Orenthal James "O. J." Simpson was tried on two counts of murder for the June 12, 1994, deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Mezzaluna restaurant waiter Ronald Goldman Simpson was declared not guilty of murder on both counts no additional arrests or convictions related to the murders have been made.
  • Bill Clinton;s Impeachement

    Bill Clinton;s Impeachement
    During his second term, President William Jefferson Clinton was accused of having perjured himself when he denied having a sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky, an intern with the federal government, and of having attempted to suborn the testimony of a witness.
  • USA Patriot Act

    USA Patriot Act
    The USA PATRIOT Act is an Act of Congress that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001. With its ten-letter abbreviation (USA PATRIOT) expanded, the full title is “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001”.
  • War on Terror

    War on Terror
    The War on Terror, also known as the Global War on Terrorism, is an international military campaign that was launched by the U.S. government after the September 11 attacks in the U.S. in 2001.
  • 9/11

    The September 11 attacks were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. Wikipedia
  • Vicky Hernandez

    Vicky Hernandez
    In this day a Hispanic baby was born named Vicky Hernandez. Parents are Vilma Villalta and Daniel Hernandez.
  • NASA Mars Rover Mission Begins

    NASA Mars Rover Mission Begins
    NASA's twin robot geologists, the Mars Exploration Rovers, launched toward Mars on June 10 and July 7, 2003, in search of answers about the history of water on Mars. They landed on Mars January 3 and January 24 PST, 2004 (January 4 and January 25 UTC, 2004).
  • Facebook Launched

    Facebook Launched
    Facebook is a social networking service launched on February 4, 2004. It was founded by Mark Zuckerberg with his college roommate and fellow Harvard University student Eduardo Saverin.
  • Hurricane Katrina

    Hurricane Katrina
    Hurricane Katrina was one of the deadliest hurricanes ever to hit the United States. An estimated 1,833 people died in the hurricane and the flooding that followed in late August 2005, and millions of others were left homeless along the Gulf Coast and in New Orleans.Aug 27, 2015
  • Saddam Hussein Executed

    Saddam Hussein Executed
    The execution of Saddam Hussein took place on Saturday, 30 December 2006. Saddam was sentenced to death by hanging, after being convicted of crimes against humanity by the Iraqi Special Tribunal for the murder of 148 Iraqi Shi'ites in the town of Dujail in 1982, in retaliation for an assassination attempt against him.
  • Iphone Released

    Iphone Released
    iPhone (/ˈaɪfoʊn/ EYE-fohn) is a line of smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. They run Apple's iOS mobile operating system. The first-generation iPhone was released on June 29, 2007, and there have been multiple new hardware iterations with new iOS releases since.
  • American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009
    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Pub.L. 111–5), nicknamed the Recovery Act, was a stimulus package enacted by the 111th U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama in February 2009.
  • Hilary Clinton Appointed U.S Secretary of State

    Hilary Clinton Appointed U.S Secretary of  State
    Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (/ˈrɒdəm/; born October 26, 1947) is an American politician who was the First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, and served as the junior U.S. Senator from New York from 2001 to 2009 and 67th United States Secretary of State from 2009 to 2013. She was the Democratic Party's nominee for President of the United States in the 2016 election.
  • Sonia Sotomayor Appointed to U.S Supreme Court

    Sonia Sotomayor Appointed to U.S Supreme Court
    In May 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Sotomayor to the Supreme Court following the retirement of Justice David Souter. Her nomination was confirmed by the Senate in August 2009 by a vote of 68–31.
  • Arab Spring

    Arab Spring
    The Arab Spring, also referred to as Arab revolutions, was a revolutionary wave of both violent and non-violent demonstrations, protests, riots, coups, foreign interventions, and civil wars in North ... Wikipedia
  • Osama Bin Laden Killed

    Osama Bin  Laden Killed
    Osama bin Laden, the founder and first leader of the Islamist group Al-Qaeda, was killed in Pakistan on May 2, 2011 shortly after 1:00 am PKT by United States Navy SEALs of the U.S. Naval Special Warfare Development Group. Wikipedia
  • Space X Falcon 9

    Space X Falcon 9
    Falcon 9 is a family of two-stage-to-orbit medium lift launch vehicles, named for its use of nine Merlin first-stage engines, designed and manufactured by SpaceX. Variants include the inital v1.0, v1.1, and current "Full Thrust" v1.2. Wikipedia
  • President TRump Elected President

    President TRump Elected President
    Donald Trump. Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017. Before entering politics, he was a businessman and television personality.
  • Period:
    2,001 BCE

    George W, Bush

    n 43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946) Synonyms: Bush, Dubya, Dubyuh, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush Example of: Chief Executive, President, President of the United States, United States President.
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    American Civil War

    Civil War definition. The war fought in the United States between northern (Union) and southern (Confederate) states from 1861 to 1865, in which the Confederacy sought to establish itself as a separate nation. The Civil War is also known as the War for Southern Independence and as the War between the States.
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    Reconstruction definition. The period after the Civil War in which the states formerly part of the Confederacy were brought back into the United States. During Reconstruction, the South was divided into military districts for the supervision of elections to set up new state governments.
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    Gilded age

    The term for this period came into use in the 1920s and 1930s and was derived from writer Mark Twain's 1873 novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, which satirized an era of serious social problems masked by a thin gold gilding.
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    Progressive Era

    The Progressive Era was a period of widespread social activism and political reform across the United States, from the 1890s to the 1920s. The main objectives of the Progressive movement were eliminating problems caused by industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and corruption in government.
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    Theodore Roosevelt

    political party: republican+progressive
    "bull moose" party
    domestic policies: square deal (3's) trust buster, nature conservation
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    William Howard Taft

    political party: republican
    domestic policy: tried 3'Cs :( 16th/17th amendment
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    Woodrow Wilson

    political party: democrat
    domestic policies: Clayton anti-trust act
    national parks service: federal reserve
    act, 18th amendment, 19th amendment
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    World War 1

    World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.
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    Roaring Twenties

    The Roaring Twenties was the period of Western society and Western culture that occurred during and around the 1920s.
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    The Holocaust

    the mass murder of Jews under the German Nazi regime during the period 1941–45. More than 6 million European Jews, as well as members of other persecuted groups, such as gypsies and homosexuals, were murdered at concentration camps such as Auschwitz.
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    The war between the Axis and the Allies, beginning on September 1, 1939, with the German invasion of Poland and ending with the surrender of Germany on May 8, 1945, and of Japan on August 14, 1945.
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    Harry S. Truman

    Truman, Harry S. [( trooh -muhn)] A political leader of the twentieth century. A Democrat, Truman was president from 1945 to 1953. In 1944, after representing Missouri in the Senate, Truman was elected vice president under President Franklin D. Roosevelt and became president when Roosevelt died.
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    Baby Boom

    Baby boomers are the demographic cohort following the Silent Generation. There are no precise dates for when this cohort starts or ends; demographers and researchers typically use starting birth years
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    Korean War

    A war, also called the Korean conflict, fought in the early 1950s between the United Nations, supported by the United States, and the communist Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea). The war began in 1950, when North Korea invaded South Korea.
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    1950s Prosperity

    The Decade of Prosperity. The economy overall grew by 37% during the 1950s. ... Inflation, which had wreaked havoc on the economy immediately after World War II, was minimal, in part because of Eisenhower's persistent efforts to balance the federal budget.
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    Dwight D. Eisenhower

    n United States general who supervised the invasion of Normandy and the defeat of Nazi Germany; 34th President of the United States (1890-1961) Synonyms: Dwight David Eisenhower, Dwight Eisenhower, Eisenhower, Ike, President Eisenhower Example of: full general, general. a general officer of the highest rank
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    Warren Court

    The Warren Court was the period in the history of the Supreme Court of the United States during which Earl Warren served as Chief Justice. Warren replaced the deceased Fred M. Vinson as Chief Justice in 1953, and Warren remained in office until he retired in 1969.
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    Vietnam War

    The Vietnam War (1955–75) was a Cold War conflict pitting the U.S. and the remnants of the French colonial government in South Vietnam against the indigenous but communist Vietnamese independence movement, the Viet Minh, following the latter's expulsion of the French in 1954.
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    John F. Kennedy

    Kennedy, John F. ( JFK) A Democratic party political leader of the twentieth century; he was president from 1961 to 1963. His election began a period of great optimism in the United States.
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    Lyndon B. Johnson

    Lyndon Baines Johnson, often referred to by his initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after having served ..
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    Richard Nixon

    n vice president under Eisenhower and 37th President of the United States; resigned after the Watergate scandal in 1974 (1913-1994) Synonyms: Nixon, President Nixon, Richard M.
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    Jimmy Carter

    James Earl "Jimmy" Carter Jr. (born October 1, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States from 1977 to 1981. ... Carter has remained active in public life during his post-presidency, and in 2002 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work in co-founding the Carter Center.
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    Gerald Ford

    Ford, Gerald definition. A political leader of the twentieth century who served as president from 1974 to 1977. A prominent Republican in Congress, Ford was named vice president in 1973, after the resignation of Spiro Agnew. He succeeded to the presidency in 1974, when President Richard Nixon was forced to resign.
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    Iran Hostage Crisis

    The Iran hostage crisis was a diplomatic standoff between Iran and the United States. Fifty-two American diplomats and citizens were held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979, to January 20, 1981
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    Persian Gulf War

    The Gulf War, codenamed Operation Desert Shield for operations leading to the buildup of troops and defense of Saudi Arabia and Operation Desert Storm in its combat phase, was a war waged by coalition ... Wikipedia
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    Cold War

    a state of political hostility between countries characterized by threats, propaganda, and other measures short of open warfare, in particular.
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    Bill Clinton

    Contending that his statement that "there's nothing going on between us" had been truthful because he had no ongoing relationship with Lewinsky at the time he was questioned, Clinton said, "It depends upon what the meaning of the word 'is' is.
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    War of Afghanistan

    S. War in Afghanistan, code named Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan (2001–2014) and Operation Freedom's Sentinel (2015–present).
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    Iraq War

    The Iraq War was a protracted armed conflict that began in 2003 with the invasion of Iraq by a United States-led coalition that overthrew the government of Saddam Hussein. An estimated 151,000 to 600,000 or more Iraqis were killed in the first 3–4 years of conflict.The invasion occurred as part of a declared war against international terrorism and its sponsors under the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush following the September 11 terrorist attacks.
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    Barack Obama

    Barack Hussein Obama II (/bəˈrɑːk huːˈseɪn oʊˈbɑːmə/ (About this sound listen);[1] born August 4, 1961) is an American politician who served as the 44th President of the United States from 2009 to 2017. The first African American to assume the presidency, he was previously the junior United States Senator from Illinois from 2005 to 2008. He served in the Illinois State Senate from 1997 until 2004.