Timelines

  • Treaty of Versailles

    Terms of the Treaty The Treaty of Versailles was the peace settlement signed after World War I had ended in 1918 and in the shadow of the Russian Revolution and other events in Russia. The treaty was signed at the vast Versailles Palace near Paris.
  • Roaring 20s

    Economically, the era saw the large-scale diffusion and use of automobiles, telephones, motion pictures, and electricity, unprecedented industrial growth, accelerated consumer demand and aspirations, and significant changes in lifestyle and culture. Finally the Wall Street Crash of 1929 ended the era, as the Great Depression set in worldwide, bringing years of worldwide gloom and hardship.
  • Hyperinflation

    The German inflation of 1914–1923 had an inconspicuous beginning, a creeping rate of one to two percent. On the first day of the war, the German Reichsbank, like the other central banks of the belligerent powers, suspended redeemability of its notes in order to prevent a run on its gold reserves. Germany 87.63 17.92
  • Wall Street Crash

    The Wall Street Crash of 1929, also known as the Great Crash and the Stock Market Crash of 1929, began in late October 1929 and was the most devastating stock market crash in the history of the United States and did not end in the United States until the onset of American mobilization for World War II at the end of 1941.
  • Great Depression

    The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression in the decade preceding World War II. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations, but in most countries it started in 1930 and lasted until the late 1930s or middle 1940s.
    The depression originated in the U.S., after the fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday).
  • The Holocaust

    The Holocaust refers to the period from January 30, 1933, when Hitler became chancellor of Germany, to May 8, 1945 when the war in Europe ended. During this time, Jews in Europe were subjected to progressively harsh persecution that ultimately led to the murder of 6,000,000 Jews (1.5 million of these being children) and the destruction of 5,000 Jewish communities.
  • Pearl Harbour

    It was a surprise military strike conducted by the Imperial Japanese Navy against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on the morning of December 7, 1941 (December 8 in Japan).
    The base was attacked by 353 Japanese fighters, bombers and torpedo planes in two waves, launched from six aircraft carriers.
    The following day (December 8), the United States declared war on Japan.
  • Atomic Bombs of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Were conducted by the United States during the final stages of World War II in 1945. These two events represent the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date. The bomb dropped on Hiroshima was known as "Little Boy". The bomb dropped on Nagasaki three days later was significantly larger and was known as "Fat Boy".