Medieval Music

Timeline created by JDickenson0778
In Music
  • 540

    Pope Gregory the Great (c. 540 – 12 March 604)

    Pope Gregory the Great (c. 540 – 12 March 604)
    Pope Gregory I (Latin: Gregorius I; c. 540 – 12 March 604), commonly known as Saint Gregory the Great,[1] was Pope from 3 September 590 to his death in 604. Gregory is well known for his writings, which were more prolific than those of any of his predecessors as pope. - <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_Gregory_I' target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>
  • Jan 1, 1098

    Hildegard of Bingen (1098 – 17 September 1179)

    Hildegard of Bingen (1098 – 17 September 1179)
    Saint Hildegard of Bingen was a German writer, composer, philosopher, Christian mystic, Benedictine abbess, visionary, and polymath. Elected a magistra by her fellow nuns in 1136, she founded the monasteries of Rupertsberg in 1150 and Eibingen in 1165. One of her works as a composer, the Ordo Virtutum, is an early example of liturgical drama and arguably the oldest surviving morality play. - <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hildegard_of_Bingen' target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>
  • Jan 1, 1150

    Leonius (fl. 1150s — d. ? 1201)

    Leonius (fl. 1150s — d. ? 1201)
    Léonin (also Leoninus, Leonius, Leo) (fl. 1150s — d. ? 1201) was the first known significant composer of polyphonic organum. He was probably French, probably lived and worked in Paris at the Notre Dame Cathedral and was the earliest member of the Notre Dame school of polyphony and the ars antiqua style who is known by name. - <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A9onin' target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>
  • Jan 1, 1300

    Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300 – April 1377)

    Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300 – April 1377)
    Guillaume de Machaut (sometimes spelled Machault) was a medieval French poet and composer. He is one of the earliest composers on whom significant biographical information is available. - <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_de_Machaut' target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>
  • Jan 1, 1343

    Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343 – 25 October 1400)

    Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343 – 25 October 1400)
    Geoffrey Chaucer, known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and was the first poet to have been buried in Poet's Corner of Westminster Abbey. - <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_Chaucer' target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>
  • Aug 5, 1397

    Guillaume Dufay (August 5, c. 1397 – November 27, 1474)

    Guillaume Dufay (August 5, c. 1397 – November 27, 1474)
    Guillaume Dufay (Du Fay, Du Fayt) was a Netherlandish composer of the early Renaissance. As the central figure in the Burgundian School, he was the most famous and influential composer in Europe in the mid-15th century. - <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Dufay' target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>
  • Jan 1, 1400

    Gilles de Binche (ca. 1400 – 20 September 1460)

    Gilles de Binche (ca. 1400 – 20 September 1460)
    Gilles de Binche (called Binchois), also known as Gilles de Bins, was a Netherlandish composer, one of the earliest members of the Burgundian school and one of the three most famous composers of the early 15th century. - <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilles_Binchois' target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>
  • Pérotin (fl. c. 1200)

    Pérotin (fl. c. 1200)
    Pérotin, also called Perotin the Great, was a European composer, believed to be French, who lived around the end of the 12th and beginning of the 13th century. He was the most famous member of the Notre Dame school of polyphony and the ars antiqua style. - <a href='http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C3%A9rotin' target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>