Dustin Klumb's 2000's Game Industry Event Timeline

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    Dustin Klumb's 2000's Game Industry Event Timeline

  • Redstone sells Midway for $100,000 (Slide 4)

    Redstone sells Midway for $100,000 (Slide 4)
    Image courtesy of videogamer.comReferences:
    Martin, M. (December 1, 2008). Redstone sells Midway for $100,000. Gameindustry.biz. Retrieved on December 7, 2011 from http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/redstone-sells-midway-for-100-000.
    Quinn, J. (December 1, 2008). Sumner Redstone Sells Midway Stake. Retrieved on December 7, 2011 from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/mediatechnologyandtelecoms/3540537/Sumner-Redstone-sells-Midway-stake.html.
  • Redstone sells Midway for $100,000 (Slide 3)

    Redstone sells Midway for $100,000 (Slide 3)
    Image courtesy of Pacific Geek
    Question 3: How would the event affect you as a game designer or developer?
    With all the turmoil regarding Midway, it would be difficult to get a license to publish any Midway characters in my game or use any of their licensed content. Also, if I were a designer at Midway, I would have lost my job that would have affected me more so than just licensing issues obviously.
  • Redstone sells Midway for $100,000 (Slide 2)

    Redstone sells Midway for $100,000 (Slide 2)
    Image courtesy of Midway Games
    Question 2: Why was the event important to the industry?
    Seeing an industry innovator and hero, like Midway, go down in flames is always a wake up call for others in the industry. It shows you that know one is immortal in this industry. Midway brought us great games like Mortal Kombat, Cruis'n USA and Smash TV.
  • Redstone sells Midway for $100,000 (Slide 1)

    Redstone sells Midway for $100,000 (Slide 1)
    Image courtesy of The Telegraph
    Question 1: What are the details of the event?
    "Mr. Redstone sold an 87% stake in Midway, maker of the Mortal Kombat franchise of computer games, for $100,000 in order to help restructure an $1.6bn loan at his National Amusements holding company. for USD 100,000" (Quinn, J. 2008).
  • Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy (Slide 4)

    Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy (Slide 4)
    image courtesy of iTnewsReferences:
    Hall, T. (February 18, 2010). Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy. iTnews. Retrieved on December 7, 2011 from http://www.itnews.com.au/News/167490,nintendo-wins-lawsuit-over-r4-mod-chip-piracy.aspx
  • Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy (Slide 3)

    Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy (Slide 3)
    Image courtesy of news.com.au
    Question 3: How would the event affect you as a game designer or developer?
    Well knowing that there is no longer selling a mod chip that allows users to pirate a game that I have designed would be a huge relief. We saw how pirated music affected the music industry in such a negative way, I wouldn't want that to happen to me.
  • Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy (Slide 2)

    Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy (Slide 2)
    [Image courtesy of Sonic Rapid Board](xhttp://srb.sonicrapidboard.com/ar/t1418.htm)
    Question 2: Why was the event important to the industry?
    This settlement and cease of the R4 mod chip being distributed stopped another attempt of people trying to pirate video games. Companies spend millions of dollars on certain games and designers invest hundreds of hours into creating games just to have people pirate them later. This was a huge win for the gaming industry!
  • Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy (Slide 1)

    Nintendo wins lawsuit over R4 mod chip piracy (Slide 1)
    Image courtesy of iTnews
    Question 1: What are the details of the event?
    An Australian distributor was selling R4 mod chips for the Nintendo DS that allowed players to download pirated copies of games from the internet onto internal flash memory of the chip. Nintendo took this distributor to court and settled out of court. The court still ordered the distributor to pay $100,000 + settlement.
  • White Paper: VBS2 (Slide 1)

    White Paper: VBS2 (Slide 1)
    Image courtesy of B.I.A.
    Question 1: What are the details of the event?
    Bohemia Interactive Australia (BIA) released the software known as Virtual Battle Space 2 (VBS2) which is a "powerful "serious game" platform that is now the worldwide benchmark for desktop-based simulation, particularly in the areas of tactical training and mission rehearsal" (Bohemia Interactive Australia. 2010).
  • White Paper: VBS2 (Slide 2)

    White Paper: VBS2 (Slide 2)
    image courtesy of B.I.A.
    Question 2: Why was the event important to the industry?
    VBS2 brings new technology to the video game industry. VBS2 can produce real moon phases that influences visibility at night, infrared chemical lightsticks for vehicle identification, Earth curvature and high dynamic range rendering that produces simulated pupil reactions based upon light intensity. This type of technology would be most beneficial for primarily first-person shooters like Battlefield 3 or Call of Duty.
  • White Paper:VBS2 (Slide 4)

    References:
    Bohemia Interactive Australia. (2010). White Paper: VBS2. Retrieved on December 6, 2011 from Bohemia Interactive Australia - VBS2 Bohemia Interactibe Australia. (2010). Content Library. VBS2. Retrieved on December 6, 2011 from http://armory.bisimulations.com/products/vbs2/overview?qt-vbs2_sidebar=10#block-menu-menu-use-cases.
  • White Paper: VBS2 (Slide 3)

    White Paper: VBS2 (Slide 3)
    Image courtesy of B.I.A.
    Question 3: How would the event affect you as a game designer or developer?
    VBS2 provides us technology that, previously wasn't available to us, we can incorporate into our games to improve the players experience and more realistic. This technology could also improve our current game mechanics in order to help teach the skills required to play that certain game.
  • Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional' (Slide 4)

    Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional' (Slide 4)
    Image courtesy of Conservativebyte.com
    References:
    Guardian. (June 27, 2011). Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional'. Retrieved on December 7, 2011 from http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/27/violent-video-game-ban-unconstitutional.
    Conservative byte. (June 27, 2011). Supreme Court Upholds Violent Video Games Sales to Kids. Retrieved on December 7, 2011 from http://conservativebyte.com/2011/06/supreme-court-upholds-violent-video-games-sales-to-kids/.
  • Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional (Slide 3)

    Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional (Slide 3)
    Image courtesy of conservativebyte.com
    Question 3: How would the event affect you as a game designer or developer?
    This rejection of a ban would possibly put my game in more players hands. This could create a larger fanbase for my video game, which in turn would lead to a better possibility of success.
  • Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional (Slide 2)

    Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional (Slide 2)
    Image courtesy of Teach-ICT.com
    Question 2: Why was the event important to the industry?
    By preventing a law that bans retailers from selling a mature game to minors, the gaming industry has gained the possibility of more video game sales. The court is leaving the choice in the parents hands if their kids can have the game or not, not the retailer. Thus, creating more revenue.
  • Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional (Slide 1)

    Violent video game ban for children 'unconstitutional (Slide 1)
    Image courtesy of The Guardian
    Question 1: What are the details of the event?
    "The US supreme court has ruled the state of California cannot ban the rental or sale of violent video games to children" (Guardian. 2011). The supreme court threw out a ban of the sale or rental of a mature video game to anyone under 18, stating that the ban violated the minors civil rights (Conservativebyte. 2011).
  • Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers (Slide 4)

    Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers (Slide 4)
    References:
    Orland, K. (July 12, 2011) Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers. Gamasutra. Retreived on December 7, 2011 from http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/35822/Touchscreen_Keyboard_Maker_Swype_Teases_Expansion_Into_Controllers.php Needleman, R. (September 9, 2008). Move over T9, here comes Swype. CNET. Retrieved on December 7, 2011 from http://news.cnet.com/8301-17939_109-10037202-2.html
  • Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers (Slide 3)

    Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers (Slide 3)
    Image courtesy of Rafe Needleman from CNET
    Question 3: How would the event affect you as a game designer or developer?
    I don't believe it would affect me as a game designer. I think the Swype technology would improve current forms of communication via gaming devices. This technology performs best when it is embedded at the operating system level (Needleman, R.). So game designers shouldn't be affected by this improvement.
  • Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers (Slide 2)

    Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers (Slide 2)
    Image courtesy of Chris from MobileTopSoft
    Question 2: Why was the event important to the industry?
    The video game industry doesn't need this technology but it could be very handy. How many times have you chose pre-generated names in games because you didn't want to take the time to create your own. I believe that this technology would allow users to quickly make changes and personalize their gaming experience.
  • Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers (Slide 1)

    Touchscreen Keyboard Maker Swype Teases Expansion Into Controllers (Slide 1)
    Image courtesy of Gamasutra
    Question 1: What are the details of the event?
    Swype announced that they have plans to integrate their Swype technology into video game controllers in the future. Swype technology allows users to slide their fingers across the touch keyboard to create words, instead of touching each letter individually.