LGBTQIA+ History, a sampling

  • Federal gov't bans gay employees

    Federal gov't bans gay employees
    President Dwight D. Eisenhower signs an executive order that bans homosexuals from working for the federal government, saying they are a security risk.
  • Daughters of Bilitis, 1st org for lesbian visibility

    Daughters of Bilitis, 1st org for lesbian visibility
    Nearly fifteen years before the birth of gay liberation, the Daughters of Bilitis (DOB) was the world’s first organization committed to lesbian visibility and empowerment. Like its predominantly gay male counterpart, the Mattachine Society, DOB was launched in response to the oppressive anti-homosexual climate of the McCarthy era, when lesbian and gay people were arrested, fired from jobs, and had their children taken away simply because of their sexual orientation.
  • Stonewall Riots Begin

    Stonewall Riots Begin
    Police raid the Stonewall Inn in New York City. Protests and demonstrations begin, and it later becomes known as the impetus for the gay civil rights movement in the United States. The riots, which lasted 6 days, fought against police brutality and was largely led by black and brown people.
  • The Advocate founding issue

    The Advocate founding issue
    The "Los Angeles Advocate," founded in 1967, (renamed "The Advocate"). It is considered the oldest continuing LGBTQ publication that began as a newsletter published by the activist group Personal Rights in Defense and Education (PRIDE).
  • First Pride March on the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots

    First Pride March on the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots
    Community members in New York City march through the local streets to recognize the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall riots. This event is named Christopher Street Liberation Day and is now considered the first gay pride parade.
  • Maryland bans gay marraige

    Maryland becomes the first state to statutorily ban same-sex marriage.
  • Renee Richards banned from US Open for being trans

    Renee Richards banned from US Open for being trans
    After undergoing gender reassignment surgery in 1975, ophthalmologist and professional tennis player Renee Richards is banned from competing in the women's US Open because of a "women-born-women" rule. Richards challenges the decision and in 1977, the New York Supreme Court rules in her favor. Richards competes in the 1977 US Open but is defeated in the first round by Virginia Wade.
  • First HIV/AIDS discrimination lawsuit

    First HIV/AIDS discrimination lawsuit
    Lambda Legal wins People v. West 12 Tenants Corp., the first HIV/AIDS discrimination lawsuit. Neighbors attempted to evict Dr. Joseph Sonnabend from the building because he was treating HIV-positive patients.
  • "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" bans gays in the military

    "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" bans gays in the military
    President Bill Clinton signs a military policy directive that prohibits openly gay and lesbian Americans from serving in the military, but also prohibits the harassment of "closeted" homosexuals. The policy is known as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell."
  • Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) federally bans same-sex marriage

    Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) federally bans same-sex marriage
    President Clinton signs the Defense of Marriage Act, banning federal recognition of same-sex marriage and defining marriage as "a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife."
  • Hawaii declares gov't has no right to deny marriage licenses

    Hawaii declares gov't has no right to deny marriage licenses
    Hawaii's Judge Chang rules that the state does not have a legal right to deprive same-sex couples of the right to marry, making Hawaii the first state to recognize that gay and lesbian couples are entitled to the same privileges as heterosexual married couples.
  • "Yup, I'm Gay"

    "Yup, I'm Gay"
    Comedian Ellen DeGeneres comes out as a lesbian on the cover of Time magazine, stating, "Yep, I'm Gay."
  • Coretta Scott King advocates for LGBT rights

    Coretta Scott King advocates for LGBT rights
    Martin Luther King Jr.'s widow, Coretta Scott King, asks the civil rights community to help in the effort to extinguish homophobia.
  • Brutal hate crime shakes America

    Brutal hate crime shakes America
    Matthew Shepard is tied to a fence and beaten near Laramie, Wyoming. He is eventually found by a cyclist, who initially mistakes him for a scarecrow. He later dies due to his injuries sustained in the beating. This brutal murder paved the way for hate crime legislation.
  • SCOTUS strikes down sodomy laws

    SCOTUS strikes down sodomy laws
    The US Supreme Court strikes down the "homosexual conduct" law, which decriminalizes same-sex sexual conduct, with their opinion in Lawrence v. Texas. The decision also reverses Bowers v. Hardwick, a 1986 US Supreme Court ruling that upheld Georgia's sodomy law.
  • First legal gay marriage

    First legal gay marriage
    The first legal same-sex marriage in the United States takes place in Massachusetts.
  • California votes for gay marriage (Prop 8)

    California votes for gay marriage (Prop 8)
    The California legislature becomes the first to pass a bill allowing marriage between same-sex couples. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoes the bill.
  • CA Supreme Court upholds Prop 8

    CA Supreme Court upholds Prop 8
    The California Supreme Court rules that limiting marriage to opposite-sex couples is unconstitutional.
  • "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" repealed, allowing gays in the military

    "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" repealed, allowing gays in the military
    "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" is repealed by congress, ending a ban on gay men and lesbians from serving openly in the military.
  • Dems become first party to stand for LGBT rights

    The Democratic Party becomes the first major US political party in history to publicly support same-sex marriage on a national platform at the Democratic National Convention.
  • Obama becomes first president to support LGBT Rights

    Obama becomes first president to support LGBT Rights
    In an ABC interview, Obama becomes the first sitting US president to publicly support the freedom for LGBTQ couples to marry.
  • SCOTUS federally recognizes same sex marriage

    SCOTUS federally recognizes same sex marriage
    the U.S. Supreme Court struck down all state bans on same-sex marriage, legalized it in all fifty states, and required states to honor out-of-state same-sex marriage licenses in the case Obergefell v. Hodges.
  • Stonewall Inn becomes a national monument

    Stonewall Inn becomes a national monument
    Obama announces the designation of the first national monument to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBTQ) rights. The Stonewall National Monument will encompass Christopher Park, the Stonewall Inn and the surrounding streets and sidewalks that were the sites of the 1969 Stonewall uprising.
  • "Trans Ban" on military lifted, allowing people to serve openly

    Secretary of Defense Carter announces that the Pentagon is lifting the ban on transgender people serving openly in the US military.
  • Trump re-bans trans people from military

    Trump re-bans trans people from military
    The Trump administration announces a new policy that bans most transgender people from serving in military. After several court battles, the Supreme Court allows the ban to go into effect in January 2019.
  • SCOTUS landmark anti-discrimination case

    SCOTUS landmark anti-discrimination case
    The Supreme Court rules that federal law protects LGBTQ workers from discrimination. The landmark ruling extends protections to millions of workers nationwide and is a defeat for the Trump administration, which argued that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act that bars discrimination based on sex did not extend to claims of gender identity and sexual orientation.