Civil war

Civil War

  • Missouri Compromise

    Missouri Compromise
    The Missouri Compromise was an effort by Congress to defuse the sectional and political rivalries triggered by the request of Missouri late in 1819 for admission as a state in which slavery would be permitted. At the time, the United States contained twenty-two states, evenly divided between slave and free.
  • Santa Fe Trail

    Santa Fe Trail
    The Santa Fe Trail was a 19th-century transportation route through central North America that connected Franklin, Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. Pioneered in 1821 by William Becknell, it served as a vital commercial highway until the introduction of the railroad to Santa Fe in 1880.
  • Harriet Tubman

    Harriet Tubman
    Harriet Tubman was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and, during the American Civil War, a Union spy.
  • San Felipe De Austin

    San Felipe, also known as San Felipe de Austin, is a town in Austin County, Texas, United States. The town was the social, economic, and political center of the early Stephen F. Austin colony. The population was 747 at the 2010 census.
  • Mexico abolishes Slavery

    Mexico abolishes Slavery
    In 1829 Mexico abolished slavery, but it granted an exception until 1830 to Texas. That year Mexico made the importation of slaves illegal. Anglo-American immigration to the province slowed at this point, with settlers angry about the changing rules.
  • Oregon Trail

    Oregon Trail
    The Oregon Trail is a 2,200-mile (3,500 km) historic east–west large-wheeled wagon route and emigrant trail that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon. The eastern part of the Oregon Trail spanned part of the future state of Kansas and nearly all of what are now the states of Nebraska and Wyoming. The western half of the trail spanned most of the future states of Idaho and Oregon.
  • The Liberator

    The Liberator
    Issac Knapp
  • Nat Turners Rebellion

    Nat Turners Rebellion
    was a slave rebellion that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, during August 1831. Led by Nat Turner, rebel slaves killed anywhere from 55 to 65 people, the highest number of fatalities caused by any slave uprising in the American South.
  • Stephen F. Austin goes to jail

    Stephen F. Austin goes to jail
    Stephen Fuller Austin was a reluctant revolutionary. His father, Moses Austin, won permission from the Mexican government in 1821 to settle 300 Anglo-American families in Texas
  • Texas Revolution

    Texas Revolution
    After a decade of political and cultural clashes between the Mexican government and the increasingly large population of American settlers in Texas, hostilities erupted in October 1835. Texians (English-speaking settlers) disagreed on whether the ultimate goal was independence or a return to the Mexican Constitution of 1824. While delegates at the Consultation (provisional government) debated the war's motives, Texians and a flood of volunteers from the United States defeated the small garrison
  • Manifest Destiny

    Manifest Destiny
    Manifest Destiny is a term for the attitude prevalent during the 19th century period of American expansion that the United States not only could, but was destined to, stretch from coast to coast. This attitude helped fuel western settlement, Native American removal and war with Mexico.
  • Underground Railroad

    Underground Railroad
    was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by 19th-century enslaved people of African descent in the United States in efforts to escape to free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.
  • Texas Enters the U.S

    Texas Enters the U.S
    Six months after the congress of the Republic of Texas accepts U.S. annexation of the territory, Texas is admitted into the United States as the 28th state.
  • Abolition

    Abolition
    the action or an act of abolishing a system, practice, or institution.
  • Mexican American War

    Mexican American War
    In the United States, the conflict lasting from 1846-1848 is termed the Mexican–American War, also known as the Mexican War, the U.S.–Mexican War or the Invasion of Mexico;
  • Treaty of Guadaulpe Hidaalgo

    Treaty of Guadaulpe Hidaalgo
    officially entitled the Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Limits and Settlement between the United States of America and the Mexican Republic, is the peace treaty
  • The North Star

    The North Star
    A star that always points north
  • Compromise of 1850

    Compromise of 1850
    a package of five separate bills passed by the United States Congress in September 1850, which defused a four-year political confrontation between slave and free states regarding the status of territories acquired during the Mexican-American War
  • Fugitive Slave Act

    Fugitive Slave Act
    The Fugitive Slave Acts were a pair of federal laws that allowed for the capture and return of runaway slaves within the territory of the United States.
  • Uncle Toms Cabin

    Uncle Toms Cabin
    Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly, is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Published in 1852, the novel "helped lay the groundwork for the Civil War", according to Will Kaufman.
  • Kansas Nebraska Act

    Kansas Nebraska Act
    opening new lands for settlement, and had the effect of repealing the Missouri Compromise of 1820 by allowing white male settlers in those territories to determine through popular sovereignty whether they would allow slavery
  • Draed Scott v Sandford

    Draed Scott v Sandford
    Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. 393, was a landmark decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court held that African Americans, whether enslaved or free, could not be American citizens
  • Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas Debates

    Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas Debates
    In 1858, as the country moved ever closer to disunion, two politicians from Illinois attracted the attention of a nation. From August 21 until October 15,
  • John browns Raid

    John browns Raid
    John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry was an attempt by the white abolitionist John Brown to start an armed slave revolt in 1859 by seizing a United States arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia.
  • Attack on fort Sumter

    Attack on fort Sumter
    The Battle of Fort Sumter was the bombardment and surrender of Fort Sumter, near Charleston, South Carolina, that started the American Civil War
  • Battle of Bull Run

    Battle of Bull Run
    The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as First Manassas, was fought on July 21, 1861, in Prince William County, Virginia, near the city of Manassas, not far from the city of Washington, D.C
  • Abraham Lincoln becomes Pesident

    Abraham Lincoln becomes Pesident
    Abe lincoln becomes president
  • Formation of the confederacy

    Formation of the confederacy
    The Confederate States of America, commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was a confederation of secessionist American states existing from 1861 to 1865.
  • Battle of Antietam

    Battle of Antietam
    The Battle of Antietam also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South, fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, and Antietam Creek as part of the Maryland
  • Battle at Vicksberg

    Battle at Vicksberg
    The Siege of Vicksburg was the final major military action in the Vicksburg Campaign of the American Civil War.
  • Emancipation Proclomation

    Emancipation Proclomation
    President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free."
  • Conscription

    Conscription
    compulsory enlistment for state service, typically into the armed forces.
  • Income Tax

    An income tax is a government levy (tax) imposed on individuals or entities (taxpayers) that varies with the income or profits (taxable income) of the taxpayer. Details vary widely by jurisdiction. Many jurisdictions refer to income tax on business entities as companies tax or corporate tax.
  • Battle at Gettysberg

    Battle at Gettysberg
    The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.
  • Gettysberg Address

    Gettysberg Address
    The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known in American history.[4] It was delivered by Lincoln during the American Civil War, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Shermans March

    Shermans March
    Sherman's March to the Sea is the name commonly given to the military Savannah Campaign in the American Civil War, conducted through Georgia from November 15 to December 21, 1864 by Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman of the Union Army
  • Surrender at Appotomox Courthouse

    Surrender at Appotomox Courthouse
    Union surrendered
  • Thirteen Admendment

    Thirteen Admendment
    "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
  • Assasanation of Abrham Lincoln

    Assasanation of Abrham Lincoln
    On April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, a famous actor and Confederate sympathizer, fatally shot President Abraham Lincoln at a play at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. The attack came only five days after Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered his massive army at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, effectively ending the American Civil War.