Events Leading up to the Revolution

  • Thesis

    The American Revolution was caused by mounting tension bewtween the American colonists and Britain over conflict of ideas on liberties, behavior, and rights.
  • The French and Indian War

    The French and Indian War
    The French and Indian War was an array of battles between England and France. Tension originally grew over the "upper Ohio Valley." The land was vital to the French because it was what would link their Canadian 'holdings" with the land in the lower Mississippi Valley. The French saw eaerly success, but stood no chance against the strategy of William Pitt. Britain came out victorios. By the end of the French and
    Indian War, colonist began to doubt England's power.
  • Source French and Indian War

    Bailey, Thomas A, David M Kennedy, and Lizabeth Cohen. The American Pageant. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. Print.
  • Albany Plan of Union

    Albany Plan of Union
    The Albany plan of Union was designed to put the all British American colonies under one government.The plan was put into affect by the "Albany Congress," not only for one government, but because the British government wanted to sign a treaty with the nearby Iroquois that showed clear relations between the colonies and Indians. The plan was never executed because many colonial governments rejected the plan or chose not to participate.
  • Source Albany Plan of Union

    "Albany Plan of Union, 1754." U.S. Department of State Diplomacy in Actoin. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Oct. 2009. <http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/cp/
    90611.htm>.
  • Battle of Quebec

    Battle of Quebec
    The Battle of Quebec is significant because when Montreal fell, any French power in North America was gone. Great Britain came out as the leading power in North America, hopeful of being the leading naval power of the world.
  • Source Battle of Quebec

    Danby Pickering, ed. Statutes at Large. Vols. 25 and 30. Cambridge, Mass. J. Bentham, 1762-1867, pp. 336-341, 366-371; 381-390
  • Treaty of Paris

    Treaty of Paris
    The Treaty of Paris ended the French and Indian/ Seven Years' War. Britain obtained Canada, all of French land in Louisiana east of the Mississippi River and Spain's land in Florida. Spain gained New Orleans and French land west of the Mississippi River. This was a blow to the French because they were no longer prevelent in North America
  • Source Treaty of Paris

    Bailey, Thomas A, David M Kennedy, and Lizabeth Cohen. The American Pageant. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. Print.
  • Proclamation of 1763

    Proclamation of 1763
    The Proclamation of 1763 was an effort to please Native Americans after the French and Indian war. The lands west of the Appalachian Mountains were established as a Native American reservation and land titles secured from western native americans were revoked. Britain failed to enforce authority with the new rules, resulting in tension not being relieved between the Indians and colonists. Britain did not want tension to mount so they could avoid sending troops back after the war.
  • Source the Proclamation of 1763

    James, Otis. The Annuals of America, vol. 2, 1755-83,Chicago. Encyclopedia Britannica, 1926-87, pp. 84-86
  • The Sugar Act

    The Sugar Act
    The Sugar Act was a revised version of the Molasses Act of 1733. It reduced the tax on sugar from 6 pence to 3 pence. It also placed a tax on many foreign goods in hopes to reduce the trade with places such as the West Indies. It reduced the markets to where the colonists could sell their products and also reduced the amount of currency available to them to buy British goods. Colonists were outraged for being taxed without representation and oftern smuggled goods to avoid the tax.
  • Source the Sugar Act

    Kindig, Thomas. "The Sugar Act." Ushistory.org. Independace Hall Association, 1999-2009. Web. 26 Oct. 2009.
  • Quartering Act

    Quartering Act
    The Quartering Act was an indirect tax on the colonies in which some people were required to provide housing and supplies for soldiers. The colonists were negative to the act, and really started to become suspicious of Britain's real intent for the recent acts.
  • Source Quartering Act

    Bailey, Thomas A, David M Kennedy, and Lizabeth Cohen. The American Pageant. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. Print.
  • Stamp Act Congress

    Stamp Act Congress
    The Stamp Act Congress met in New York and looked for resolutions to get the Stamp Act repealed and denied that Parliament could tax them. The merchants in New York agreed to boycott British goods, which reduced British imports to pressure Parliament into repealing the Stamp Act.
  • Source Stamp Act Congress

    Purvis, Thomas, and Richard Balkin. Revolutionary America 1763-1800. New York City: Facts on File Inc., n.d. Print.
  • The Stamp Act

    The Stamp Act
    The Stamp Act was made to raise revenue to pay the costs of protection of the colonies. It also banned the use of colonial currency for the payment of imported British government. This angered colonists because it showed that the British believed they had the power to tax the colonies with no representation.
  • Source The Stamp Act

    Otis, James. The Annuals of America, vol.2, 1755-83,Chicago. Encyclopedia Britannica, 1926-87, pp 84-86
  • Repeal of the Stamp Act

    Repeal of the Stamp Act
    Parliament was forced to repeal the Stamp Act after the Americans boycotted British Goods. It was important in the path to the Revolution because it proved the colonists were not powerless . The colonists were victorious in the debate around the Stamp Act.
  • Declatory Act

    Declatory Act
    The Declatory Act was made to secure the colonists' dependance on Britain. It said that the colonies would subordinate unto, and dependent on Britain and that Britain had the right and power to make laws for the people of America. This is important in the revolution because it shows that the struggle for independance by the colonists has affected England.
  • Source Declatory Act

    Kindig, Thomas. "Declatory Act." ushistory.org. Independance Hall Association, 1999-2009. Web. 26 Oct.2009 <http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/ related/declaratory.htm>.
  • Source Repeal of Stamp Act

    Rosenfeld, Susan. ".." Enclyclopedia of American Historical Documents. Vol. 1. New York City: Facts on File, 2004. Print.
  • Townshend Act

    Townshend Act
    The act was passed by Parliament which placed a duty on things like glass,white lead, paper, paint, and tea. It was an "indirect custom duty payable at American ports." This continued the issue with the angry colonists that they should not be taxed without representation.
  • Source Townshend Acts

    Bailey, Thomas A, David M Kennedy, and Lizabeth Cohen. The American Pageant. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. Print.
  • Boston Massacre

    Boston Massacre
    The Boston Massacre was a result of the accumulated tensions of the military and colonists since the British troops were there due to the Townshend Act. Eleven citizens were killed of wounded. This was the first physical act of violence between the British and colonists.
  • Source Boston Massacre

    Bailey, Thomas A, David M Kennedy, and Lizabeth Cohen. The Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. Print.
  • The Boston Tea Party

    The Boston Tea Party
    When the British East India Company was in possession of too much unsold tea, the ministry tried to help by giving it a monopoly over the American tea business. Although prices were reduced, Americans remained unhappy. Even though the tax was cheaper, it was still taz, and therefore unacceptable. To retaliate, colonists dressed as Indians dumped 342 chests of tea into the Boston Harbor.
  • Source Boston Tea Party

    Bailey, Thomas A, David M Kennedy, and Lizabeth Cohen. The American Pageant. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. Print.
  • The Intolerable Acts

    The Intolerable Acts
    The Boston Tea Party was not taken lightly by Parliament. It passed "Repressive Acts" to affect Boston especially. Further punishment included the Boston Port Act which closed the harbor until damages were paid for. Many colonists saw the acts as a violation of their rights.
  • Quebec Act

    Quebec Act
    The Quebec Act granted greater rights to the French that were conquered during the war. It was significant because it wasn't a direct punishment on Massachusetts, but a brought about a different vibe over the country.
  • Source Quebec Act

    Danby Pickering, ed. Statues at Large. Vols. 25 and 30. Cambridge, Mass.J.Bentham, 1762-1867.pp 336-341, 366-371, 381-390.
  • First Continental Congress

    First Continental Congress
    The Congress figured out procedures for eliminating commerce between the 13 American colonies and the rest of British empire. It lead to the Revolution because the Congress started working on separating themselves from Britain.
  • Source First Continental Congress

    Rosenfeld, Susan. ".." Enclyclopedia of American Historical Documents. Vol. 1. New York City: Facts on File, 2004. Print.
  • Battle of Lexington and Concord

    Battle of Lexington and Concord
    This was the first battle of the American Revolutionary War. The first shots were fired at Lexington and Americans lost badly, and the British moved on to Concord. At Concord, the British were forced to retreat. The Americans emerged as a serious threat to Britain.
  • Source Battle of Lexington and Concord

    Bailey, Thomas A, David M Kennedy, and Lizabeth Cohen. The American Pageant. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. Print.