ENGLISH LITERATURE

  • 731

    The Venerable Bede

    The Venerable Bede
    He is known as a writer and scholar, his most famous work being the Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (Ecclesiastical History of the People of the Angles), which earned him the title of "Father of English History". Beda wrote about many other topics, from music to religion. In fact, on occasion, he is considered a Father of the Church more.
  • 800

    Beowulf

    Beowulf
    is an anonymous Anglo-Saxon epic poem that was written in Old English in alliterative verse. It has 3182 verses, also Beowulf, is the first great work of Germanic literature, mingles the legends of Scandinavia with the experience in England of Angles and Saxons
  • 950

    The material of the Eddas

    The material of the Eddas
    The material of the Eddas, which takes shape in Iceland, is derived from earlier sources in Norway, Great Britain and Burgundy.
    The Edda are compilations of stories related to Norse mythology.
    They are fragmentary parts of an ancient skaldic tradition of oral narration (currently lost) that was compiled and written by scholars who preserved a part of these stories.
  • 1300

    Juan Duns Scoto

    Juan Duns Scoto
    Duns Scotus, known as the Subtle Doctor in medieval times, later gives the humanists the name of Dunsman or dunce
    He was a Scottish theologian belonging to scholasticism. He entered the Franciscan order and studied in Cambridge, Oxford and Paris; He was a professor in these last two universities. The subtlety of his analysis earned him the nickname of "Doctor Subtle".
  • 1340

    Ockham's Razor

    Ockham's Razor
    it is a methodological and philosophical principle attributed to the Franciscan friar, philosopher and scholastic logician Guillermo de Ockham , according to which: Under equal conditions, the simplest explanation is usually the most probable. This implies that, when two theories in equal conditions have the same consequences, the simplest theory is more likely to be correct than the complex one. William of Ockham advocates reducing arguments to essentials, a focus later known as Ockham's Razor
  • 1367

    William Langland (Narrator)

    William Langland (Narrator)
    A narrator who calls himself Will, and whose name may be Langland, begins the epic poem by Piers Plowman.
    Pedro the Labrador or Pedro the Labriego is a medieval allegorical poem written by William Langland in alliterative verses without rhyme. The poem of the account of the visions that the protagonist has when he falls asleep and falls into a deep sleep near the hills of Malvern. Wikipedia
  • 1375

    Poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

    Poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
    The courtly poem Sir Gawain and the green knight speak of a mysterious visitor at the round table of King Arthur.
    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a metrical romance of the late fourteenth century written in a single manuscript, which also contains three other works more Christian orientation. The four poems are linked by the use of a common dialect, the dialectal variety of Northwest Midlands of Middle English.
  • 1385

    Chaucer completes his long poem

    Chaucer completes his  long poem
    Chaucer completes Troilus and Criseyde, his long poem about a legendary romance in ancient Troy.
     In this poem he tells us how in the Middle English the tragic story of the lovers Troilus and Criseyde is given in a war context during the siege of Troy. It was composed using rime royale and probably completed in the mid-1380s
  • 1387

    100 Canterbury Tales By Chaucer

    100 Canterbury Tales By Chaucer
    Chaucer begins an ambitious plan for 100 Canterbury Tales, of which he only turns 24 by the time of his death.
  • 1469

    Morte d'Arthur By Thomas Malory

    Morte d'Arthur By Thomas Malory
    Thomas Malory, in prison somewhere in England, compiles Morte d'Arthur, an account in English of the French tales of King Arthur, it is also said that the book The Death of Arthur is the version of Sir Thomas Malory on history of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, based on several English and French legends.
  • 1510

    Christian humanism

    Christian humanism
    Erasmus and Thomas More take the Northern Renaissance in the direction of Christian humanism.
  • 1524

    The bible in English By Tyndale

    The bible in English By Tyndale
    William Tyndale studies in the university at Wittenberg and plans to translate the Bible into English
  • 1549

    The first English prayer book

    The first  English prayer book
    The first version of the English prayer book, or Book of Common Prayer, is published with text by Thomas Cranmer
  • 1564

    Born of Marlowe and Shakespeare

    Born of Marlowe and Shakespeare
    Marlowe and Shakespeare are born in the same year, with Marlowe the older by two months
  • 1567

    The Book of Common Prayer and the New Testament

    The Book of Common Prayer and the New Testament
    El Libro de Oración Común y el Nuevo Testamento se publican en galés, para ser seguidos por la Biblia completa en 1588.
  • Tamburlaine the Great

    Tamburlaine the Great
    Marlowe's first work, Tamburlaine the Great, presents the shocking blank verse of the Elizabethan and Jacobean drama.
    Based vaguely on the life of the famous emperor Timur the lame, it was written between 1587 or 1588, representing a cornerstone of the Elizabethan drama and departing from the clumsy language and unclear argumentation of the dramatists of the Tudor era. The language is vivid and fresh, the action is spectacular and the intellectual complexity adds interest
  • Richard III By Shakespeare

    Richard III By Shakespeare
    After tentative beginnings in the three parts of Henry VI, Shakespeare achieves his first masterpiece on stage with Richard III which is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, the last work of his tetralogy on the history of England. After Hamlet, it is the longest piece of the playwright. The entire tetralogy was composed at the beginning of Shakespeare's career
  • Hamlet

    Hamlet
    The central character of Shakespeare in Hamlet expresses both the ideals of the Renaissance and the disappointment of a less confident era
  • Authorized version of the Bible

     Authorized version of the Bible
    Santiago (I) commissions the authorized version of the Bible, which is completed by forty-seven academics in seven years.
  • William Shakespeare as an actor

    William Shakespeare as an actor
    William Shakespeare's name appears among the actors in a list of the King's Men
  • The Masque of Blackness

    The Masque of Blackness
    Ben Jonson writes The Masque of Blackness, the first of his many masques for the court of James I.
    The Masque of Blackness was an early Jacobean era masque, first performed at the Stuart Court in the Banqueting Hall of Whitehall Palace on Twelfth Night, 6 January 1605
  • Volpone By Ben Jonson

    Volpone By Ben Jonson
    The satirical voice of English playwright Ben Jonson has a powerful effect on Volpone
  • A Description of New England By John smith

    A Description of New England By John smith
    John Smith publishes A Description of New England, a review of his exploration of the region in 1614,It was published in 1616 as a piece of propaganda announcing the fertile land, the abundant resources and the general fullness that was found in the New World
  • Begins a journal of the Pilgrims' experience

    Begins a journal of the Pilgrims' experience
    William Bradford begins a journal of the experience of the pilgrims in New England, published later (in 1856) as History of Plymouth Plantation.
  • John Donne

    John Donne
    John Donne, the main metaphysical poet of England, becomes dean of Saint Paul
  • FIRST FOLIO

    FIRST FOLIO
    John Heminge and Henry Condell publish thirty-six works of Shakespeare on the first folio
  • The Temple By George Hebert

    The Temple By George Hebert
    The only volume of poems by George Herbert, The Temple, is published posthumously; His metaphysical poems of deep religiosity give off an attitude of modesty. His poetry was published under the title of The Temple.
  • Lycidas By Milton

    Lycidas By Milton
    is a poem by John Milton, written in 1637 as a pastoral elegy. It first appeared in a 1638 collection of elegies, entitled Justa Edouardo King Naufrago, dedicated to the memory of Edward King, friend of Milton's at Cambridge who drowned when his ship sank in the Irish Sea off the coast of Wales in August 1637. The poem is 193 lines in length, and is irregularly rhymed. While many of the other poems in the compilation are in Greek and Latin, "Lycidas" is one of the poems written in English.
  • The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America

    The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America
    The poems of the author of Massachusetts Anne Bradstreet are published in London with the title The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America
    It was Bradstreet's only work published in his life. Published allegedly without the knowledge of Bradstreet, Bradstreet wrote to his editor acknowledging that he knew about the publication. She was forced to pretend that she did not know about the publication until later, or she would have risked being criticized.
  • The Compleat Angler By Izaak Walton

    The Compleat Angler By Izaak Walton
    Devoted fisherman Izaak Walton publishes the classic work on the subject, The Compleat Angler
    It is a fishing project that, despite the years, continues to enjoy great acceptance by readers.
     The dialogue, which has fishing as its pretext, reaches almost poetic levels, in the form of reflections on art and its charms
  • Samuel Pepys finishes his diary

     Samuel Pepys finishes his diary
    Samuel Pepys finishes his diary, after only writing it for nine years.
    Samuel Pepys, a naval officer, politician and celebrated British diarist, is best known for the detailed private diary he kept between 1660 and 1669, published more than a hundred years after his death.
  • Part I of The Pilgrim's Progress

    Part I of The Pilgrim's Progress
    Part I of The Pilgrim's Progress, written during John Bunyan's two spells in Bedford Gaol, is published and is immediately popular
  • Oroonoko By Aprha Bens

    Oroonoko By Aprha Bens
    The novel by Aphra Behn, Oroonoko, makes an early protest against the inhumanity of the slave trade in Africa.
    The work, whose protagonist is an enslaved African and taken to Suriname during the 1660s, has a loving relationship that, apparently, was inspired by the trips that the author herself made to the South American colonies.
  • John Locke publishes Human Understanding

    John Locke publishes Human Understanding
    John Locke publishes his Essay on Human Understanding, arguing that all knowledge is based on experience
  • The Age of Augustus

     The Age of Augustus
    begins in English literature, claiming comparison with the flowering equivalent under Augustus Caesar ,It is a time that saw the rapid development of the novel, an explosion of satire, the evolution of theater from political satire to melodrama, and an evolution towards poetry of personal exploration. In philosophy, it was an era dominated by empiricism, while the writings of political economy marked the evolution of mercantilism in a scientific sense.
  • A New style of journalism

    A New style of journalism
    The Tatler launches a new style of journalism in the cafeterias of Great Britain, followed two years later by the Spectator.
  • Dispute between George Berkeley and Locke

    Dispute between George Berkeley and Locke
    25-year-old George Berkeley attacks Locke in his Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge
  • Alexander Pope's Rape of the Lock

     Alexander Pope's Rape of the Lock
    Alexander Pope's Rape of the Lock presents a delicate simulacrum-heroic vein in English poetry. The poem satirizes a small dispute by comparing it with the epic world of the gods. It is based on an incident told by Pope's friend, John Caryll
  • The first English novel

    The first English novel
    Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, with its detailed realism, can be considered as the first English novel.
    It is a fictional autobiography of the protagonist, an English castaway who spends 28 years on a remote desert island. Probably the story was inspired by real events that occurred to Alexander Selkirk, from where he would construct, with a simple and authentic plot, a symbol of colonialism, of the perfect man and of the supreme morality.
  • The New England Courant

    The New England Courant
    16-year-old Benjamin Franklin contributes the 'Dogood Papers', essays on moral topics, to a Boston journal, The New England Courant
  • Gulliver's Travels.

    Gulliver's Travels.
    Jonathan Swift sends his hero to a series of terribly satirical trips in Gulliver's Travels.
    Gulliver's Travels is a satire in prose by Irish writer and cleric Jonathan Swift, which is both a satire on human nature and the literary subgenre of "travel stories." It is Swift's best-known long-story work, and a classic of English literature.
  • David Hume publishes his Treatise of Human Nature

    David Hume publishes his Treatise of Human Nature
    The Treatise is a classic statement of philosophical empiricism, skepticism, and naturalism. In the introduction Hume presents the idea of placing all science and philosophy on a novel foundation: namely, an empirical investigation into human nature. Impressed by Isaac Newton's achievements in the physical sciences, Hume sought to introduce the same experimental method of reasoning into the study of human psychology, with the aim of discovering the "extent and force of human understanding
  • Clarissa by Samuel Richardson

    Clarissa by Samuel Richardson
    begins the correspondence that becomes the longest novel in the English language
    Clarissa or the story of a young lady is an epistolary novel written by Samuel Richardson and published for the first time in 1748. Although the book is generally known simply by Clarissa, sometimes the title is Clarissa Harlowe; or the History of a Young Lady
  • Thomas Gray publishes his Elegy written in a Country Church Yard

    Thomas Gray publishes his Elegy written in a Country Church Yard
    The poem's origins are unknown, but it was partly inspired by Gray's thoughts following the death of the poet Richard West in 1742. Originally titled Stanzas Wrote in a Country Church-Yard, the poem was completed when Gray was living near St Giles' parish church at Stoke Poges. It was sent to his friend Horace Walpole, who popularised the poem among London literary circles
  • Samuel Johnson publishes his magisterial Dictionary of the English Language

    Samuel Johnson publishes his magisterial Dictionary of the English Language
    A dictionary of the English language, sometimes published as the Johnson Dictionary, is one of the most influential dictionaries in the history of the English language.
  • Publishes the first two volumes of Tristram Shandy

    Publishes the first two volumes of Tristram Shandy
    The life and opinions of the gentleman Tristram Shandy, usually abbreviated as Tristram Shandy, is the most singular and famous of the works of the Irish writer Laurence Sterne. It was published in nine volumes, the first two in December 1759 and the next seven over the next eight years.
  • James Boswell meets Samuel Johnson for the first time

    James Boswell meets Samuel Johnson for the first time
    James Boswell meets Samuel Johnson for the first time, in the London bookshop of Thomas Davies
  • Fall of the Roman Empire By Edward Gibbon

    Fall of the Roman Empire By Edward Gibbon
    English historian Edward Gibbon, sitting among ruins in Rome, conceives the idea of Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.
    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is a historical work written by the Englishman Edward Gibbon, which addresses the decline and fall of the Roman Empire
  • Castle of Otranto

     Castle of Otranto
    English author Horace Walpole provides an early taste of Gothic thrills in his novel Castle of Otranto.
    It is considered the inaugural text of the Gothic terror literature, initiating a literary genre that became extremely popular in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica

    Encyclopaedia Britannica
    The Britannica articles are aimed at adult readers, and are written by a pool of 100 full-time editors and nearly 4,000 expert contributors, which have included 110 Nobel Prize winners and five United States presidents. These articles are generally considered accurate, reliable and well written. It is widely recognized as the most scholarly encyclopedia of all edited in English.
  • She Stoops to Conquer

     She Stoops to Conquer
    Oliver Goldsmith's work She Stoops to Conquer is produced at the Covent Garden Theater in London
  • The first modern book of economics

     The first modern book of economics
    An investigation on the nature and causes of the wealth of the nations, or simply the wealth of the nations, is the most famous work of Adam Smith. Published in 1776, it is considered the first modern book of economics
  • Spelling Book for American children

    Spelling Book for American children
    US lexicographer Noah Webster publishes a Spelling Book for American children that eventually will sell more than 60 million copies.
    Considered to be the third-best selling book of all time in America. With its distinctive blue cover, it earned the nickname "the blue-backed speller" and was used over the span of nearly a century.
  • Songs of Innocence

     Songs of Innocence
    William Blake publishes Songs of Innocence, a volume of his poems with every page etched and illustrated by himself.
    A few first copies were printed and illuminated by William Blake himself in 1789; five years later he bound these poems with a set of new poems in a volume titled Songs of Innocence and of Experience Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul.
  • Reflections on the Revolution in France By Edmund Burke

    Reflections on the Revolution in France By Edmund Burke
    is a political pamphlet written by the Irish statesman Edmund Burke and published in November 1790. ... Thanks to its thoroughness, rhetorical skill, and literary power, it has become one of the most widely known of Burke's writings and a classic text in political theory.
  • Publishes the first part of The Rights of Man

     Publishes the first part of The Rights of Man
    Thomas Paine publishes the first part of The Rights of Man, his reply to Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France.
    including 31 articles, posits that popular political revolution is permissible when a government does not safeguard the natural rights of its people. Using these points as a base it defends the French Revolution against Edmund Burke's attack in Reflections on the Revolution in France
  • A Vindication of the Rights of Woman By Mary Wollstonecraft

    A Vindication of the Rights of Woman By  Mary Wollstonecraft
    In it, Wollstonecraft rejects the position held by the political and educational theorists of the eighteenth century that women should not have access to education. Wollstonecraft argues that women should receive an education according to their position in society because, according to the writer, they are essential for the nation because they are the ones who educate the children and because they could be considered not only mere wives, but also peers. their husbands.
  • Age of reason By Thomas Paine

    Age of reason By Thomas Paine
    is a work by English and American political activist Thomas Paine, arguing for the philosophical position of Deism. It follows in the tradition of eighteenth-century British deism, and challenges institutionalized religion and the legitimacy of the Bible. It was published in three parts in 1794, 1795, and 1807.
    It was a best-seller in the United States was a attack on conventional Christianity
  • Wordsworth and Coleridge

    Wordsworth and Coleridge
    English poets Wordsworth and Coleridge jointly publish Lyrical Ballads, a milestone in the Romantic movement
  • The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' is published in Lyrical Ballads

    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' is published in Lyrical Ballads
    Lyrical Ballads, with a Few Other Poems is a collection of poems by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, first published in 1798 and generally considered to have marked the beginning of the English Romantic movement in literature.[1] The immediate effect on critics was modest, but it became and remains a landmark, changing the course of English literature and poetry.
  • Walter Scott publishes The Lay of the Last Minstrel

    Walter Scott publishes The Lay of the Last Minstrel
    Is the long romantic poem that first brings him fame.
    Ruth Eller states that The Lay of the Last Minstrel "is a good example of Scott's particular handling of basic Romantic themes."Donald Davie suggests that the plot is used as a vehicle to describe the historical milieu in which the action takes place.
    The poem is concerned with loyalty to one’s homeland, but also with the manner in which the poet draws his art from his connection to his country and traditions.
  • The first publication of Jane Austen

    The first publication of Jane Austen
    English author Jane Austen publishes her first work in print, Sense and Sensibility, at her own expense.
    It was the first of Austen's novels to be published, under the pseudonym "A Lady" (a lady). It has been adapted for film and television numerous times, highlighting the version of Ang Lee in 1995.
  • The first two songs are published

    The first two songs are published
    The first two cantos are published of Byron's largely autobiographical poem Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, bringing him immediate fame.
    The poem describes the travels and reflections of a world-weary young man who, disillusioned with a life of pleasure and revelry, looks for distraction in foreign lands. In a wider sense, it is an expression of the melancholy and disillusionment felt by a generation weary of the wars of the post-Revolutionary and Napoleonic eras.
  • The Pride and Prejudice publication By Jane Austine

     The Pride and Prejudice publication By Jane Austine
    Is based on a 1797 youth work called First Impressions, is the second Jane Austen novel to be published. It charts the emotional development of the protagonist Elizabeth Bennet, who learns the error of making hasty judgments and comes to appreciate the difference between the superficial and the essential. The comedy of the writing lies in the depiction of manners, education, marriage and money during the Regency era in Britain.
  • The death of Jane Austen and her legacy

    The death of Jane Austen and her legacy
    Two of Jane Austen's novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, are published in the year after her death
  • Ozymandias By Percy Shelly

    Ozymandias By Percy Shelly
    Ozymandias is a sonnet by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published on January 11, 1818, and is probably the most famous poem by the romantic poet, and perhaps one of the clearest examples of political philosophy that underlies his literary movement.
  • Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus By mary Shelley

     Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus By mary Shelley
    It is a literary work of the English writer Mary Shelley. Published on March 11, 1818 and framed in the tradition of the Gothic novel, the text talks about issues such as scientific morality, the creation and destruction of life and the audacity of humanity in its relationship with God. Hence, the subtitle of the work: the protagonist tries to rival in power with God, as a sort of modern Prometheus that snatches the sacred fire of life to the deity. It belongs to the science fiction genre.
  • Don Juan By Byron begins

     Don Juan By Byron begins
    Don Juan is a satirical poem created by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan, Byron portrays Don Juan not as a womanizer, but as someone easily seduced by women. It is a variant of the epic form. Byron himself called "satire".
  • Ivanhoe By Walter Scott

    Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
    Walter Scott publishes Ivanhoe, a tale of love, tournaments and sieges at the time of the crusades,Written in 1820 and set in medieval England, more precisely during the twelfth century.
  • Ode to the West Wind By Percy Shelly

    Ode to the West Wind By Percy Shelly
    es una oda, escrita por Percy Bysshe Shelley en 1819 cerca de Florencia, Italia. Fue publicado originalmente en 1820 por Charles en Londres como parte de la colección Prometheus Unbound, A Lyrical Drama in Four Acts, With Other Poems, con otros poemas.
  • Confessions of an English Opium-Eater By Thomas De Quincey

    Confessions of an English Opium-Eater By Thomas De Quincey
    Of solitary, bohemian, adventurous and, sometimes, tragic life, THOMAS DE QUINCE collaborated in several magazines of the time. The enormous success of these deliveries facilitated its publication in the form of a book a year later . The work reflects the ambivalent attitude of the writer towards the inexorable chain opium, key of paradise, a substance that he began to use in 1804 in order to alleviate some severe pain and whose effects he would never be able to do without completely.
  • Pickwick Papers

    Pickwick Papers
    24-year-old Charles Dickens begins monthly publication of his first work of fiction, Pickwick Papers (published in book form in 1837).
    It was the first novel published by the British writer Charles Dickens. It is considered one of the masterpieces of English literature
  • Charles Dickens' first novel, Oliver Twist

    Charles Dickens' first novel, Oliver Twist
    is the second novel by English author Charles Dickens. It was originally published as a serial novel of monthly appearance (approximately 2) in the magazine Bentley's Miscellany, directed by Dickens himself, between February 1837 and April 1839. Initially, the author intended it to be part of a more extensive work, The Mudfog Papers. Dickens published it in three volumes in November 1838, before the finished version of the magazine was published.
  • Lays of Ancient Rome By Thomas Babington

    Lays of Ancient Rome By Thomas Babington
    English author Thomas Babington Macaulay publishes a collection of stirring ballads, Lays of Ancient Rome is a collection of narrative, or secular, poems by Thomas Babington Macaulay. Four of them relate heroic episodes of early Roman history with strong dramatic and tragic themes, giving name to the collection.
  • Two nations by benjamin disraeli

    Two nations by benjamin disraeli
    Published in the same year as Friedrich Engels's The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844, Sybil traces the plight of the working classes of England. Disraeli was interested in dealing with the horrific conditions in which the majority of England's working classes lived — or, what is generally called the Condition of England question.
  • The Condition of the Working Class in England By Friedrich Engels

    The Condition of the Working Class in England By Friedrich Engels
    Friedrich Engels, after running a textile factory in Manchester, publishes The Condition of the Working Class in England
    The situation of the working class in England is one of the best-known books of Friedrich Engels. Originally written in German, it is a study of the living conditions of workers in Victorian England.
  • Vanity Fair By William Makepeace Thackeray

    Vanity Fair By  William Makepeace Thackeray
    English author William Makepeace Thackeray begins publication of his novel Vanity Fair in monthly parts (book form 1848).
    The vanity fair refers to a stop in the progress of the pilgrim: an endless fair in a city called Vanity, which pretend to represent the sinful attraction of man for worldly things.The novel is currently considered a classic, and has inspired several film adaptations, the most recent being the 2004 film starring Reese Witherspoon.
  • the first of the Brontë sisters to have a novel published — Jane Eyre

    the first of the Brontë sisters to have a novel published — Jane Eyre
    Charlotte becomes the first of the Brontë to have a novel published.
    The novel was initially titled Jane Eyre: an autobiography and published under the pseudonym of Currer Bell. It had an immediate success, both for readers and critics. One of its most staunch defenders was the writer William Makepeace Thackeray, to whom many attributed the work, because the author remained anonymous until a time after its publication. As a thank you, Charlotte dedicated the second edition of his novel to him.
  • In Memoriam A.H.H By Alfred Tennyson

     In Memoriam A.H.H By Alfred Tennyson
    Charles Dickens begins the publication in monthly numbers of David Copperfield, his own favourite among his novels
    Alfred Tennyson's elegy for a friend, In Memoriam, captures perfectly the Victorian mood of heightened sensibilityIn Memoriam A.H.H. is a long elegiac poem written by Alfred Tennyson in commemoration of his friend Arthur Henry Hallam, died in 1833. The poem is published in 1850 and is in one of the best works of Tennyson
  • Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases By Peter Mark Roget

     Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases By  Peter Mark Roget
    London physician Peter Mark Roget publishes his dictionary of synonyms, the Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases
    The Roget Thesaurus is a widely used thesaurus in English language, created in 1805 by Peter Mark Roget, British physician, natural theologian and lexicographer. It was released to the public on April 29, 1852. The original edition had 15,000 words and each new edition has been larger
  • Tom Brown's Schooldays By Thomas Hughes

    Tom Brown's Schooldays  By Thomas Hughes
    Thomas Hughes depicts the often brutal aspects of an English public school
    The novel was originally published as being by an Old Boy of Rugby, and much of it is based on the author's experiences. Tom Brown is largely based on the author's brother George Hughes. George Arthur, another of the book's main characters, is generally believed to be based on Arthur Penrhyn Stanley. The fictional Tom's life also resembles the author's in that the culminating event of his school career was a cricket match
  • On the Origin of Species By Charles Darwin

    On the Origin of Species By Charles Darwin
    considered one of the precursors of the scientific literature and the foundation of the theory of evolutionary biology.Darwin included the evidence he gathered in his expedition on the voyage of the Beagle in the 1830s and his subsequent discoveries through research, correspondence and experimentation.
    Charles Darwin puts forward the theory of evolution in On the Origin of Species, the result of 20 years' research
  • A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens

     A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
    Charles Dickens publishes his French Revolution novel, A Tale of Two Cities
    The story takes place in two countries: England and France, and in the cities of London and Paris at the time of the dawn of the French Revolution. The first city would symbolize in some way peace and tranquility, the simple and orderly life; while the second would represent agitation, challenge and chaos, the conflict between two worlds at a time when drastic social changes are announced.
  • East Lynne By Mrs Henry Wood

    East Lynne By Mrs Henry Wood
    Mrs Henry Wood publishes her first novel, East Lynne, which becomes the basis of the most popular of all Victorian melodramasA Victorian best-seller, it is remembered chiefly for its elaborate and implausible plot, centring on infidelity and double identities.There have been numerous stage and film adaptations.
    The much-quoted line "Gone! And never called me mother!" (variant: "Dead! Dead! And never called me mother!") does not appear in the book; both variants come from later stage adaptations.
  • The Water-Babies By Charles Kingsley

    The Water-Babies By Charles Kingsley
    English author Charles Kingsley publishes an improving fantasy for young children, The Water-Babies.
    Children of the Water is a children's novel written by the Reverend Charles Kingsley. It was written between 1862-1863 as a serial for Macmillan's Magazine, and was first published in its entirety in 1863. It was written in part as a satire in support of Charles Darwin's The Origin of Species.
  • Alice's Adventures in Wonderland By Lewis Carril

     Alice's Adventures in Wonderland By Lewis Carril
    Lewis Carroll publishes Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, a development of the story he had told Alice Liddell three years earlier
    The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland, commonly abbreviated as Alice in Wonderland, is a fantasy novel written by British mathematician, logician, photographer and writer Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, published in 1865
  • Culture and Anarchy By Mattew Arnold

     Culture and Anarchy By Mattew Arnold
    publishes Culture and Anarchy, an influential collection of essays about contemporary society
    The Victorian mirror of history has shown us a series of authors whose shoulders seemed to rest the task of recovering the legacy of the Humanities for their own time. «Scholars» such as Thomas Carlyle or John Ruskin or Matthew Arnold elaborated, with different inspiration, a body of thoughts in which essay writing would become an expression of moral non-conformism and the idea of ​​perfection.
  • Middlemarch By George Eliot

    Middlemarch By George Eliot
    George Eliot publishes Middlemarch, in which Dorothea makes a disastrous marriage to the pedantic Edward CasaubonA study of life in the provinces is a novel by George Eliot, the pseudonym of Mary Anne Evans, later called Marian Evans. It is his seventh novel, begun in 1869 although it was interrupted for a time by the illness of Thornton Lewes, the son of his partner George Henry Lewes.
  • Through the Looking Glass By Lewis Carroll

    Through the Looking Glass By Lewis Carroll
    Lewis Carroll publishes Through the Looking Glass, a second story of Alice's adventure. It is the continuation of The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland. Many things that happen in the book seem, metaphorically, reflected in a mirror
  • Treasure Island By Robert Louis Stevenson's ,Long John Silver and Ben Gunn

    Treasure Island By  Robert Louis Stevenson's ,Long John Silver and Ben Gunn
    Robert Louis Stevenson's adventure story, Treasure Island, features Long John Silver and Ben Gunn.
    The Treasure Island is an adventure novel written by the Scot Robert Louis Stevenson, published in a book in London in 1883. This work has been a source of inspiration in film, television, literature, comics and even video games .
  • The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde By Robert Louis Stevenson

    The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde By Robert Louis Stevenson
    Robert Louis Stevenson introduces a dual personality in his novel The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.
    sometimes simply titled Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, is a nouvelle written by Robert Louis Stevenson and published for the first time in English in 1886, which deals with a lawyer, Gabriel John Utterson, who investigates the strange relationship between his old friend , Dr. Henry Jekyll, and the misanthropic Edward Hyde
  • Study in scarlet By Arthur Conan Doyle

     Study in scarlet By Arthur Conan Doyle
    Sherlock Holmes features in Conan Doyle's first novel, A Study in Scarlet.
    Study in the scarlet is a mystery novel written by Arthur Conan Doyle and published in the annual Christmas magazine of Beeton's November 1887, with illustrations by David Henry Friston. This is the first edition of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.
  • Essays in Socialisman edited by Bernard Shaw

     Essays in Socialisman edited by Bernard Shaw
    This collection of essays by the so-called “Fabian Socialists” (who advocated socialism by means of gradual political and economic reform instead of by revolution as preferred by the Marxists) prompted a vigorous defense of laissez-faire economic policies by leading English classical liberals in the early 1890s. Two volumes of these rebuttals of Fabian socialism were edited by Thomas Mackay. The 3 volumes together make interesting reading
  • The Golden Bough By James Frazer

    The Golden Bough By James Frazer
    Scottish anthropologist James Frazer publishes The Golden Bough, a massive compilation of contemporary knowledge about ritual and religious custom.
    a study on magic and religion is a work of comparative study of mythology and religion of great magnitude, written by Scottish anthropologist James George Frazer
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde

    The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
    is a novel written by the Irish author Oscar Wilde. Originally published on June 20, 1890, as a story in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, a monthly American literary magazine, Wilde would review the work, make several modifications and add new chapters for later publication as a novel, his only work published as a novel. The modified version was published by Ward Lock & Co in April 1891.
  • The Diary of a Nobody By George and Weedon Grossmith

    The Diary of a Nobody By George and Weedon Grossmith
    The newspaper recounts the adventures of Charles Potter, a London civil servant of lower middle class with striking social aspirations living in Upper Holloway. Other characters in this work are his wife Carrie, his son Lupine, his friends Mr. Cummings and Mr. Gowing, and the very inappropriate fiancee of Lupine, Daisy Mutlar. The humorous situations originate from the constant blunders of Pooter and his efforts to pretend.
  • The jungle Book By Rudyard Kipling's

    The jungle Book By Rudyard Kipling's
    The Jungle Book surrounds the child Mowgli with a collection of vivid animal guardians.
    The story, which was initially published in magazines between 1893 and 1894 and which in some cases had illustrations of Rudyard's father, John Lockwood Kipling, is based on stories that raise moral reflections and that are played by children (one of them with capacity of talking to animals), as well as animals (mostly from the Indian jungle) with the anthropomorphic capacities to reason and speak.
  • The Time Machine By H. G. Wells

    The Time Machine By H. G. Wells
    H.G. Wells publishes The Time Machine, a story about a Time Traveller whose first stop on his journey is the year 802701.
    The Time Machine is a fictional novel by British writer Herbert George Wells, first published in London in 1895 by William Heinemann. It consists of sixteen chapters and an epilogue
  • Dracula By Bram Stroker

    Dracula  By Bram Stroker
    Dracula is a novel published in 1897 by the Irish Bram Stoker, who has turned his antagonist into the most famous vampire. It is said that the writer relied on the conversations he had with a Hungarian scholar named Arminius Vámbéry, who told him about Vlad Drăculea
  • The War of the Worlds By H.G Wells

    The War of the Worlds By H.G Wells
    H.G. Wells publishes his science-fiction novel The War of the Worlds, in which Martians arrive in a rocket to invade earthis a science fiction novel written by Herbert George Wells and published for the first time in 1898, which describes a Martian invasion of Earth. It is the first known description of an alien invasion of the Earth, and has had an undoubted influence on subsequent and abundant revisions of this same idea. Wells' novel has been adapted to different media: movies radioshows,etc.
  • The Tale of Peter Rabbit By Beatrix Potter

    The Tale of Peter Rabbit By Beatrix Potter
    The Tale of Peter Rabbit is a children's book written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter in which the protagonist, the young, mischievous and disobedient Peter Rabbit, is persecuted in the garden of Mr. McGregor. Peter flees and returns to his mother's house, who lays him down after serving him an infusion of chamomile.
  • Stories for Little Children By Rudyard Kipling

    Stories for Little Children By  Rudyard Kipling
    Rudyard Kipling publishes his Just So Stories for Little Children on a collection of short stories written by Rudyard Kipling and published in 1902. They have a fantastic character, and are one of the author's most famous works
  • The Riddle of the Sands By Robert Erskine Childers

     The Riddle of the Sands By Robert Erskine Childers
    When Carruthers, bored of the London summer and the monotony of his work in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, accepts an invitation from his friend Davis to participate in a cruise on the Baltic, he does not know that he has started an adventure as dangerous as extraordinary .
  • The Golden Bowl By Henry James

    The Golden Bowl By Henry James
    Henry James publishes his last completed novel, The Golden Bowl
    The golden cup is a novel by the American writer Henry James published in 1904; It tells the story of an American millionaire and his daughter, who has become lovers before marrying them, and who become again afterwards.
  • Ann Veronica By H.G.Wells

    Ann Veronica By H.G.Wells
    The heroine of H.G. Wells' novel Ann Veronica is a determined example of the New Woman
    It is about the life of Ann Veronica Stanley, twenty-one, who rebels against the restrictions of her authoritarian father. The novel questions the patriarchal system of the time, showing the difficult situation of women.
  • Principia Mathematica By Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell

    Principia Mathematica By Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell
    is a set of three books with the bases of mathematics written by Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead published between 1910 and 1913. This work is an attempt to derive most of the mathematical knowledge of the time from a set of principles or axioms. The main motivation for this work came from Gottlob Frege's previous work in logic that contained inconsistencies (in particular Russell's paradox). These were avoided in the Principia by building an elaborate theory of types.
  • Ragged Trousered Philanthropists By Robert Tressell

    Ragged Trousered Philanthropists  By  Robert Tressell
    Robert Tressell's Ragged Trousered Philanthropists is published posthumously in an abbreviated version
    is a semi-autobiographical novel by the Irish writer Robert Tressell, published after his death by tuberculosis in 1911, about the efforts of a house painter to find work in the fictional town of Mugsborough to avoid his work. his daughter.
  • Over the Brazier By Robert Graves

     Over the Brazier By Robert Graves
    Robert Graves publishes his first book of poems, Over the Brazier
  • Eminent Victorians By Lytton Strachey

    Eminent Victorians By Lytton Strachey
    is a book by Lytton Strachey (one of the older members of the Bloomsbury Group), first published in 1918 and consisting of biographies of four leading figures from the Victorian era. Its fame rests on the irreverence and wit Strachey brought to bear on three men and a woman who had until then been regarded as heroes: Cardinal Manning, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Arnold, and General Gordon (although Nightingale is actually praised and her reputation was enhanced).
  • The Return of the Soldier By Rebecca West

     The Return of the Soldier By Rebecca West
    is the novel of debut of the English novelist Rebecca West, published for the first time in 1918. The novel recounts the return of Captain Chris Baldry from the trenches of the First World War from the perspective of his cousin Jenny.
  • Tractatus Logico Philosophicus By Ludwig Wittgenstein

    Result of his notes and of correspondence maintained with Bertrand Russell, George Edward Moore and Keynes), written between 1914-16 while serving as lieutenant of the Austro-Hungarian army and later as a prisoner of war in Italy during the First World War, the text evolved as a continuation and a reaction to Russell and Frege's conceptions of logic and language. Along with his philosophical research, this text is one of the major works of Wittgenstein's philosophy.
  • Mrs Dalloway By Virginia Wolf

    Mrs Dalloway By Virginia Wolf
    It details a day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway, in England after the First World War. The novel follows Clarissa Dalloway through a single day in England after the Great War in a narrative-style flow of consciousness. Constructed through two small stories that Woolf had previously written ("Mrs. Dalloway on Bond Street" and her unfinished "The Prime Minister") the story of the novel are Clarissa's preparations for a party she will offer that night.
  • The hotel By Elizabeth Bowen

    The hotel By Elizabeth Bowen
    Anglo-Irish author Elizabeth Bowen publishes her first novel, The Hotel.
    These were the balmy days of the 1920s. The Hotel was a comfortable hotel on the Italian Riviera, run for prosperous English visitors. It was a closed world of wealth and a setting for the inexhaustable comedy of casual personal relationships among a variety of "nice" people.
  • Decline and Fall By Evelyn Waugh

    Decline and Fall By Evelyn Waugh
    Evelyn Waugh succeeds with a comic first novel, Decline and Fall Decline and Fall is based, in part, on Waugh's schooldays at Lancing College, undergraduate years at Hertford College, Oxford, and his experience as a teacher at Arnold House in north Wales. It is a social satire that employs the author's characteristic black humour in lampooning various features of British society in the 1920s.
  • Conquistador By Archibald Macleish

    Conquistador By  Archibald Macleish
    describes the Conquest of Mexico by putting the story in the mouth of Bernal Diaz del Castillo, the rude and ignorant soldier who wrote a masterpiece of flat and vigorous prose, True Story of the Conquest of New Spain. In Conquistador, an old Bernal, sick and invalid, recounts the vicissitudes of the conquest as he saw them and lived them. And these facts and anecdotes are told with heroic realism and naturalness. Conquistador is considered one of the most beautiful poems of American literature.
  • Brave new world by Aldous Huxley

    Brave new world by Aldous Huxley
    A Happy World is the most famous novel by the British writer Aldous Huxley, first published in 1932. The novel is a dystopia that anticipates the development of reproductive technology, human cultures and hypnopedia, managing emotions through drugs that, combined , radically change society
  • The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money By John Maynard Keynes

    The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money By John Maynard Keynes
    The general theory of employment, interest and money is considered the most outstanding work of the British economist John Maynard Keynes. To a large extent, he created the terminology of modern macroeconomics. It was published in February 1936, at a time marked by the Great Depression
  • The Happy Return By Horatio Hornblower

     The Happy Return By Horatio Hornblower
    was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. It appeared in 1937. The American name is derived from the expression "beat to quarters", which was the signal to prepare for combat. This book is sixth by internal chronology of the series (including the unfinished Hornblower and the Crisis). Hornblower's past history as narrated in the book does not entirely accord with his history as revealed in the books of the series written later but Forester never revised the book
  • In Homage to Catalonia By George Orwell

    In Homage to Catalonia By George Orwell
    s George Orwell's personal account of his experiences and observations fighting for the Republican army during the Spanish Civil War. The war was one of the shaping events on his political outlook and a significant part of what led him to write, in 1946, "Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism and for Democratic Socialism, as I understand it."
  • The Third Policema By Flann O'Brien's

    The Third Policema By Flann O'Brien's
    Flann O'Brien's The Third Policeman is rejected by numerous publishers before becoming, decades later, his best-known novel
  • Black Lamb and Grey Falcon By Rebecca West

    Black Lamb and Grey Falcon By Rebecca West
    British author Rebecca West publishes an account of Yugoslavia, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon.
    A trip through Yugoslavia is a travel book written by Dame Rebecca West, published in 1941 in two volumes by Macmillan in the United Kingdom and by The Viking Press in the United States.
  • Five on a Treasure Island By Enid Blyton

     Five on a Treasure Island By Enid Blyton
    English children's author Enid Blyton introduces the Famous Five in Five on a Treasure Island.
    is a popular children's book by Enid Blyton. It is the first book in The Famous Five series. The first edition of the book was illustrated by Eileen Soper.
  • The Pursuit of Love By Nancy Mitford

    The Pursuit of Love By  Nancy Mitford
    is a novel by Nancy Mitford, first published in 1945. It is the first in a trilogy about an upper-class English family in the interwar period. Although a comedy, the story has tragic overtones. English author Nancy Mitford has her first success with the novel The Pursuit of Love
  • Animal Farm By George Orwell's

    Animal Farm By  George Orwell's
    is a satirical novel by the British writer George Orwell. Published in 1945, the work is a fable about the Soviet regime of Stalin corrupts socialism.
    In George Orwell's fable Animal Farm a ruthless pig, Napoleon, controls the farmyard using the techniques of Stalin
  • The Lady's Not For Burning By Christopher Fry's

     The Lady's Not For Burning By Christopher Fry's
    A romantic comedy in three acts, in verse, it is set in the Middle Ages ("1400, either more or less exactly"). It reflects the world's "exhaustion and despair" following World War II, with a war-weary soldier who wants to die, and an accused witch who wants to live. In form, it resembles Shakespeare's pastoral comedies. Christopher Fry's verse drama The Lady's Not For Burning engages in high-spirited poetic word play
  • Narnia in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe By C.S. Lewis

    Narnia in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe By C.S. Lewis
    is a fantastic children's novel published by C. S. Lewis in 1950. It is the best-known book in the series of seven books called The Chronicles of Narnia. Although in order of publication it was the first book of the series written by the author, it is actually the second according to the internal chronology, after The nephew of the magician. C.S. Lewis gives the first glimpse of Narnia in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
  • The Grass Is Singing By Doris Lessing

    The Grass Is Singing By Doris Lessing
    is the first novel, published in 1950, by British Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing. It takes place in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), in southern Africa, during the 1940s and deals with the racial politics between whites and blacks in that country (which was then a British Colony). The novel created a sensation when it was first published and became an instant success in Europe and the United States.
  • The Go-Between By L.P. Hartley

    The Go-Between By L.P. Hartley
    His best-known work, it has been adapted several times for stage and screen. The book gives a critical view of society at the end of the Victorian era through the eyes of a naïve schoolboy outsider.
    English author L.P. Hartley sets his novel The Go-Between in the summer of 1900
  • James Bond Casino Royale By Ian Fleming

    James Bond Casino Royale By Ian Fleming
    James Bond, agent 007, has a licence to kill in Ian Fleming's first novel, Casino Royale.Published in 1953
    The story concerns the British secret agent James Bond, gambling at the casino in Royale-les-Eaux to bankrupt Le Chiffre, the treasurer of a French union and a member of the Russian secret service. Bond is supported in his endeavours by Vesper Lynd, a member of his own service ...
  • The Second World War By Winston Churchill

    The Second World War By Winston Churchill
    Churchill wrote the book, with a team of assistants, using both his own notes and privileged access to official documents while still working as a politician; the text was vetted by the Cabinet Secretary. Churchill was largely fair in his treatment, but wrote the history from his personal point of view. He was unable to reveal all the facts, as some, such as the use of Ultra electronic intelligence, had to remain secret.
  • The Quiet American By Graham Greene

    The Quiet American By Graham Greene
    is a novel published in 1955 by the British writer Graham Greene.
    The novel has been taken to the cinema in two occasions: first, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz in 1958, and the second, in 2002, directed by Phillip Noyce and carried out by Michael Caine and Brendan Fraser. Released on November 22, 2002 in the United States and March 14 of the same year in Spain.
  • The Lord of the Rings By J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Lord of the Rings By  J.R.R. Tolkien
    British philologist J.R.R. Tolkien publishes the third and final volume of his epic fantasy The Lord of the Rings The return of the King is the third volume of the heroic fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings, by the British writer J. R. R. Tolkien. The two towers is the volume immediately before this volume, and the first in the series is The Ring Community.
  • Saturday Night and Sunday Morning By

    Saturday Night and Sunday Morning By
    Is the first novel by British author Alan Sillitoe and won the Author's Club First Novel Award.It was adapted by Sillitoe into a 1960 film starring Albert Finney, directed by Karel Reisz, and in 1964 was adapted by David Brett as a play for the Nottingham Playhouse, with Ian McKellen playing one of his first leading roles. Sillitoe later wrote two further parts to the Seatons' story, Key to the Door and The Open Door (1989).
  • Summoned by Bells By John Betjeman

    Summoned by Bells By John Betjeman
    English poet John Betjeman publishes his long autobiographical poem Summoned by Bells.
    John Betjeman's blank verse autobiography describes his life from his earliest memories of a middle-class home in Edwardian Hampstead, London, until his early departure from Magdalen College, Oxford.
  • James and the Giant Peach By Roald Dahl

    James and the Giant Peach By Roald Dahl
    is a novel for children by the British writer Roald Dahl, first published in 1961 in Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.
    It is about a boy named James Henry Trotter, who lived with his parents in a small house on the seashore. One day, when he was 4 years old, they went to London. But while they were walking, a rhinoceros escaped from a zoo and devoured their parents
  • The Glden Notebook By Doris Lessing

    The Glden Notebook By Doris Lessing
    This book, as well as the couple who followed it, enters the realm of what Margaret Drabble in The Oxford Companion to English Literature has called "interior space fiction" by Lessing, his work that explores the mental and social rupture. The book also contains a powerful anti-war and anti-Stalinist message, a broad analysis of Communism and the Communist Party in England from the 1930s to the 1950s, and a famous examination of the feminist and sexual movements.
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory By Roald Dahl

    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory By Roald Dahl
    harlie and the Chocolate Factory was first published in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. in 1964 and in the United Kingdom by George Allen & Unwin, 11 months later. The book has been adapted into two major motion pictures: Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory in 1971, and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory in 2005. The book's sequel, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, was written by Roald Dahl in 1971 and published in 1972.
  • A Day in the Death of Joe Egg By Peter Nichols

    A Day in the Death of Joe Egg By Peter Nichols
    is a 1967 play by the English playwright Peter Nichols, first staged at the Citizens Theatre in Glasgow, Scotland, before transferring to the Comedy Theatre in London's West End.
  • The French Lieutenant's WomanThe French Lieutenant's Woman By John Fowles

    The French Lieutenant's WomanThe French Lieutenant's Woman By John Fowles
    is a 1969 postmodern historical fiction novel by John Fowles. It was his third published novel, after The Collector (1963) and The Magus (1965). The novel explores the fraught relationship of gentleman and amateur naturalist Charles Smithson and Sarah Woodruff, the former governess and independent woman with whom he falls in love. The novel builds on Fowles' authority in Victorian literature, both following and critiquing many of the conventions of period novels
  • Small is Beautiful By Ernst Friedrich Schumacher

    Small is Beautiful By Ernst Friedrich Schumacher
    British economist Ernst Friedrich Schumacher publishes an influential economic tract, Small is Beautiful.
    The book is divided into four parts: "The modern world", "Resources", "The Third World", and "Organization and property".
    is a collection of essays by the German economist E. F. Schumacher. The phrase "Small Is Beautiful" came from a phrase of his teacher Leopold Kohr.
  • The Cement Garden By Ian McEwan.

    The Cement Garden By Ian McEwan.
    British author Ian McEwan publishes his first novel, The Cement Garden
    is a 1978 novel by Ian McEwan. It was adapted into a 1993 film of the same name by Andrew Birkin, starring Charlotte Gainsbourg and Andrew Robertson.
  • True West By Sam Shepard

    True West By Sam Shepard
    Some critics consider it the third of a Family Trilogy which includes Curse of the Starving Class (1976) and Buried Child (1979).Others consider it part of a quintet which includes Fool for Love (1983) and A Lie of the Mind (1985).
    True West was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1983.
  • The Economic Consequences of Mrs Thatcher By Nicholas Kaldor

    The Economic Consequences of Mrs Thatcher By Nicholas Kaldor
    British economist Nicholas Kaldor attacks monetarism in The Economic Consequences of Mrs Thatcher
  • Translation The Inferno of Dante

     Translation The Inferno of Dante
    US poet Robert Pinsky publishes an acclaimed verse translation, The Inferno of Dante.is the first part of Italian writer Dante Alighieri's 14th-century epic poem Divine Comedy. It is followed by Purgatorio and Paradiso. The Inferno tells the journey of Dante through Hell, guided by the ancient Roman poet Virgil.
  • The Dread Affair By Benjamin Zephaniah

    The Dread Affair By  Benjamin Zephaniah
    British Rasta poet Benjamin Zephaniah publishes his second collection as The Dread Affair
  • The Bonfire of the Vanities By Tom Wolfe

     The Bonfire of the Vanities By Tom Wolfe
    is a 1987 satirical novel by Tom Wolfe. The story is a drama about ambition, racism, social class, politics, and greed in 1980s New York City and centers on three main characters: WASP bond trader Sherman McCoy, Jewish assistant district attorney Larry Kramer, and British expatriate journalist Peter Fallow.
  • Regeneration By Pat Barker's

    Regeneration By Pat Barker's
    Is a historical and anti-war novel by Pat Barker, first published in 1991. The novel was a Booker Prize nominee and was described by the New York Times Book Review as one of the four best novels of the year in its year of publication. It is the first of three novels in the Regeneration Trilogy of novels on the First World War, the other two being The Eye in the Door and The Ghost Road, which won the Booker Prize in 1995.
  • Angels in America By Tony Kushnner

    Angels in America By Tony Kushnner
    is a two-part play by American playwright Tony Kushner. The work won numerous awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the Tony Award for Best Play, and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Play. Part one of the play premiered in 1991 and its Broadway opening was in 1993.
  • Trainspotting By Irvine Welsh

    Trainspotting By Irvine Welsh
    First published in 1993. It takes the form of a collection of short stories, written in either Scots, Scottish English or British English, revolving around various residents of Leith, Edinburgh who either use heroin, are friends of the core group of heroin users, or engage in destructive activities that are implicitly portrayed as addictions that serve the same function as heroin addiction.
  • Captain Corelli's Mandolin By Louis De Bernières

    Captain Corelli's Mandolin By Louis De Bernières
    Louis de Bernières publishes Captain Corelli's Mandolin, a love story set in Italian-occupied Cephalonia
    A mandolin by Captain Corelli, launched simultaneously in the United States as Corelli's mandolin, is a 1994 novel by British writer Louis de Bernières, set on the Greek island of Kefalonia during the Italian and German occupation of World War II.
  • The Simple Truth By David Baldacci

    The Simple Truth By 	David Baldacci
    US poet Philip Levine wins a Pulitzer Prize with his volume of poems Simple Truth
    The Simple Truth is a crime novel written by David Baldacci. The book was initially published on November 18, 1998 by Grand Central Publishing.[1][2]
  • Birthday Letters By Ted Hughes

     Birthday Letters By  Ted Hughes
    The birthday cards of Ted Hughes are directed, except two, to Sylvia Plath, the mythical North American poet with whom she was married and with whom she had two children. They were written over a period of more than twenty-five years, the first shortly after her death, and constitute the only version he gave of their relationship and the dramatic circumstances in which both were submerged and that would lead to Plath to write his best poems and finally to death.
  • Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone By J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone By J.K. Rowling
    The first novel in Rowling's debut novel, it follows Harry Potter, a young wizard who discovers his magical heritage on his eleventh birthday, when he receives a letter of acceptance to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Harry makes close friends and a few enemies during his first year at the school, and with the help of his friends, Harry faces an attempted comeback by the dark wizard Lord Voldemort, who killed Harry's parents, but failed to kill Harry when he was just 15 months old.
  • The God of Small Things By Arundhati Roy

     The God of Small Things By Arundhati Roy
    The god of small things is a novel written in English by the Indian writer Arundhati Roy, born in 1961, who tells the experiences of the childhood of two twin brothers in the Indian state of Kerala, during the year 1969
  • His Dark Materials By Philip Pullman

    His Dark Materials By  Philip Pullman
    is a trilogy of fantastic novels written by the British Philip Pullman. It includes the books Lights of the North (Northern Lights, published in the United States as The Golden Compass), The dagger (The Subtle Knife) and The lacquered spyglass (The Amber Spyglass). This trilogy is complemented by other minor works by Pullman, Lyra's Oxford and Once Upon a Time in the North, as well as The book of Dust