Burgunder EDU 493 Timeline Project

Timeline created by facebooker_2922763454402892
  • 1000

    Salemo Founded

    Founded in the 10th century, Salemo was the earliest university (at least among those listed in our texts).
  • 1167

    Oxford University founded

    Oxford University founded
    Located in Oxford, United Kingdom, Oxford University was one of the first nine institutions founded.
  • 1209

    Cambridge University Founded

    Cambridge University Founded
  • 1231

    Parens Scientarium Issued

    Parens Scientarium Issued
    Pope Gregory IX issued the Parens Scientarium, which safeguarded the University of Paris' independence and self-governance.
  • 1413

    St. Andrews Founded

    St. Andrews Founded
    Another of the original nine institutions, St. Andrews is located in Scotland. Fun fact: in modern times, it's famous for being Prince William and Kate Middleton's alma mater!
  • College of William and Mary Chartered

    College of William and Mary Chartered
    A land grant provided the means for the College of William and Mary to be established in 1693. It's primary purpose was to educate members of the clergy and prepare them to serve in the colonies' Anglican churches.
  • College of Philadelphia founded

    College of Philadelphia founded
    The College of Philadelphia is founded. It would go on to become the University of Pennsylvania.
  • College of New Jersey Founded

    College of New Jersey Founded
    A Presbyterian-affiliated institution, the College of New Jersey was founded in 1746. It would go on to become Princeton University.
  • King's College Founded

    King's College Founded
    King's College was an Anglican institution founded in 1754. It would become known as Columbia University.
  • First Native Americans Enrolled

    In 1769, the first Native Americans enrolled as students at Dartmouth. By the end of the 1700s, there were more than 4 dozen enrolled (Cohen & Kisker, p. 22)
  • 25 Colleges

    25 Colleges
    By this point in American history, there were 25 institutions of higher education operating in the United States.
  • 52 Colleges

    52 Colleges
    By 1820, the number of institutions had grown from 25 to 52.
  • Yale Report

    Yale Report
    The Yale Report discussed the importance of liberal arts education while also pressing for the ancient Greek and Latin languages and texts to be preserved in collegiate curricula.
  • Morrill Act

    Morrill Act
    The Morrill Land Grant Act established a system in which parcels of land could be designated for colleges and universities which met certain criteria. Institutions like Cornell were established via the land grant and are still operating today.
  • College Entrance Examination Board Founded

    College Entrance Examination Board Founded
    The College Entrance Examination Board was the earliest iteration of a "College Board"/ SAT type organization. They were responsible for developing, administering, and overseeing formal admissions testing for Higher Education.
  • American Association of Universities Founded

    American Association of Universities Founded
    A small group of elite research universities were founding members of the AAU. The number has now grown to 65.
  • 5% of 18-20 year-olds attended college

    5% of 18-20 year-olds attended college
    According to Thelin, less than 5% of students between the ages of eighteen and twenty pursued higher education (p. 174).
  • Admissions Growth

    Admissions Growth
    By 1937, the number of students between the ages of eighteen and twenty at colleges and universities had grown from less than 5% to 15% (Thelin, p. 205).
  • End of World War II

    End of World War II
    The end of World War II signaled both a return to "normalcy" in higher education (the return of the soldiers and support personnel that had served in the war) but also a time of tremendous change (passage of the GI bill and new pushes for women to have access to education).
  • Cold War begins

    Cold War begins
    A period of military tension between the US and the Soviet Union, the Cold War led to an arms race.
  • Brown v. Board of Ed

    Brown v. Board of Ed
    Brown v. Board of Ed is the case everyone remembers when it comes to the end of "separate but equal" and the start of racial integration in education.
  • Higher Education Act Passed

    Higher Education Act Passed
    President Lyndon Johnson's Higher Education Act provided additional resources for institutions of higher education and also established greater opportunities for student financial aid.
  • Conflicts at Kent State University and Jackson State University

    Conflicts at Kent State University and Jackson State University
    Conflict between student protesters and police/National Guard personnel resulted in casualties at both institutions.
  • Title IX passed

    Title IX passed
    Title IX was groundbreaking legislation that prevented discrimination based on sex. Though commonly considered to have played the greatest role in collegiate athletics, it is becoming increasingly important in combating the issue of sexual assault on college campuses.
  • FERPA passed

    FERPA passed
    The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act established parameters for who had access to a student's educational information, including grades, financial information, conduct reports, etc.
  • Supreme Court Rules on Affirmative Action

    Supreme Court Rules on Affirmative Action
    Supreme Court prohibits quotas but allows colleges to afford special privileges to underrepresented students in the admissions process.
  • Michigan Tuition Savings Program Established

    Michigan Tuition Savings Program Established
    Michigan began the first "statewide prepaid-tuition plan, allowing parents to start saving for college when their children are still in diapers" ("Timeline: 50 Years of Higher Education", 2016). Timeline: 50 Years of Higher Education. (2016, November 6). Retrieved December 8, 2019, from https://www.chronicle.com/article/Timeline-50-Years-of-Higher/238267.
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) passed

    Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) passed
    The ADA was another piece of influential legislation. It established national protections for people with disabilities, including accessibility, accommodations, employment, and building requirements among others.
  • Period: to

    Civil War

    The Civil War threw the nation (and subsequently higher education) into turmoil.
  • Period: to

    Problematic Admissions Strategies

    During this time period, college admissions strategies "lacked coherent planning" (Thelin, p. 174)