Martin Luther King Jr. Facts

  • 'Birth of a New Nation' Sermon

    'Birth of a New Nation' Sermon
    On April 4, 1957 King delivered his 'Birth of a New Nation' Sermon. King gave the sermon to his congregation at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. King delivered the sermon after visiting Ghana, a new African Nation. King pointed out that in order to gain freedom for African Americans the nation must work hard together. He also referred to the importance of peaceful protest.
  • 'Give Us the Ballot' Speech

    'Give Us the Ballot' Speech
    King gave his 'Give us the Ballot' Speech on May 17, 1957 at the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom gathering at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.. The idea of the speech was to promote voting rights for African Americans in the United States. King also focused on changes that would happen if African Americans were allowed to vote.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Escapes Assasination

    Martin Luther King Jr. Escapes Assasination
    On September 20, 1958 Izola Ware Curry attempted to kill King at a book signing in Harlem. Curry approached King and asked,"Is this Martin Luther King?" King simply replied,"Yes." After the conformation Curry stabbed King with a letter opener entering near his aorta. Curry was planning on shooting him soon after but she was stopped before she could draw her gun. King was then taken to the hospital. It took the surgeon 3 hours to remove the weapon. If King would have sneezed he would have died.
  • 'Letter from Birmingham Jail'

    'Letter from Birmingham Jail'
    On April 16, 1963 King wrote a letter from Birmigham jail. King was protesting the treatment of blacks in Birmingham, Alabama. The letter was a response to eight southern religious leaders. In the letter he defended peaceful protests of segregation.
  • 'March on Washington'

    'March on Washington'
    The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was held on August 28, 1963. There were roughly 250,000 people in attendence. The event is said to be the largest occupated event in the capital to this day. The event was meant to pressure John F. Kennedy to commence a civil rights bill. Kings famous 'I Have a Dream' Speech took place during this event.
  • 'I Have A Dream' Speech

    'I Have A Dream' Speech
    King gave his most famous speech, 'I Have a Dream' Speech, on August 28, 1963 during the March on Washington. In this speech King promoted ending segregation and gaining economic and civil rights for African Americans. The speech was 17 minutes long. King gave this speech in front of roughly 250,000 spectators.
  • 'Why We Can't Wait' is Published

    'Why We Can't Wait' is Published
    King published his book 'Why We Can't Wait' in 1964. The book focused on gaining civil rights for African Americans using peaceful protests. The book also focuses on 1963's accomplishments such as the Birmingham Campaign. King refers to 1963 as a landmark year in the Civil Rights Movement and the beginning of America's "Negro Revolution."
  • Youngest of His Time to Win a Nobel Peace Prize

    Youngest of His Time to Win a Nobel Peace Prize
    On October 14, 1964 King became the youngest person to win a Nobel Peace Prize. King won the prize due to his methods of peaceful protest while protesting segregation. As of 2014 King is not the youngest person to win a Nobel Peace Prize. It is now Malala Yousafzai (age 17) who won it on December 10, 2014.
  • 'Beyond Vietnam' Speech

    'Beyond Vietnam' Speech
    Kings speech 'Beyond Vietnam,' also referred to as the Riverside Church Speech, was given on April 4, 1967. Many recognize the speech as a time to break silence. The speech was meant to help end the Vietnam War and promote social justice.
  • Assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee

    Assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee
    On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King Jr. was gunned down at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. Just before his death King gave his final speech, the famous 'Mountaintop' Speech. In this speech King 'foretold' his death and talked about how he has been threatened many times.