Lewisandclark

Lewis and Clark Anchor RH

  • starting point st. louis MO

    starting point st. louis MO
    The Commanding officer feels himself mortifyed and disappointed at the disorderly conduct of Reubin Fields, in refusing to mount guard when in the due roteen of duty he was regularly warned; nor is he less surprised at the want of discretion in those who urged his oposition to the faithfull discharge of his duty, particularly Shields, whose sense of propryety he had every reason to believe would have induced him reather to have promoted good order, than to have excited disorder and faction among
  • Period: to

    lewis and clark journey

    Their travels
  • start

    start
    Expedition sets off from Camp Dubois “under a jentle brease,” Clark writes. (Lewis is in St. Louis and joins group a few days later.) Nearly four dozen men involved (the precise number is unknown). Members hail from every corner of the young nation. Reuben and Joseph Field are brothers. George Drouillard, Pierre Cruzatte, François Labiche are sons of French-Canadian fathers and Indian mothers. Besides captains, other diarists are John Ordway, a young soldier from New Hampshire; Patrick Gass, a
  • meriwither lewis

    meriwither lewis
    ... Persons accustomed to the navigation of the Missouri and the Mississippi also below the mouth of this river, uniformly take the precaution to load their vessels heavyest in the bow when they ascend the stream in order to avoid the danger incedent to runing foul of the concealed timber which lyes in great quantitites in the beds of these rivers
  • charles floyd

    charles floyd
    we Set out at 5 oclock after much Feteaged of yesterdays worke ... ouer hunters Killed 4 Bars and 3 Deer Strong water encampt on the N Side opset to antent old villag of Missures Indians but the Saukies beng two trobelsom for them was forst to move and take protections under the Gran ossags as they war Redused Small handsom a prarie as ever eney man saw the river is 3 miles wide hear
  • casualties

    casualties
    Near what is now Sioux City, Iowa, Sergeant Charles Floyd becomes the expedition’s first casualty from what was probably a burst appendix. Capt. Clark said he was vomiting violently and suffering extreme pain. no medication worked.
  • Experience with a Sioux Tribe

    Experience with a Sioux Tribe
    Expedition holds friendly council with Yankton Sioux (near what is now Yankton, South Dakota). According to Yankton oral tradition, when a baby is born, Lewis wraps him in a United States flag and declares him “an American.”
  • A spot where a baby is born

    A spot where a baby is born
    Sacagawea gives birth to a baby boy, Jean Baptiste. Lewis assists in speeding the delivery by giving her a potion made by crushing the rings of a rattlesnake’s rattle into powder.
  • fort mandan

    fort mandan
    Our vessels consisted of six small canoes, and two large perogues. This little fleet altho' not quite so rispectable as those of Columbus or Capt. Cook, were still viewed by us with as much pleasure as those deservedly famed adventurers ever beheld theirs; and I dare say with quite as much anxiety for their safety and preservation. we were now about to penetrate a country at least two thousand miles in width, on which the foot of civilized man had never trodden; the good or evil it h
  • Seaman

    Seaman
    one of the party wounded a beaver, and my dog as usual swam in to catch it; the beaver bit him through the hind leg and cut the artery; it was with great difficulty that I could stop the blood; I fear it will yet prove fatal to him.he did eventually recover.one Indian offered Lewis three beaver pelts for the dog and another Indian tried to steal Seaman. Of course, Lewis could not part with his beloved dog. He uncharacteristically threatened to burn down their village unless the dog was returned.
  • A spot where an animal profoundly affected the expedition

    The shipment sent from Fort Mandan finally arrives in the East. Jefferson will plant the Indian corn in his Monticello garden, hang elk antlers in his foyer, and send the surviving animals – a magpie and the prairie dog – to a natural science museum located in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall. Reading Lewis’s confident letter, he would imagine the expedition having already reached the Pacific. Source of the Missouri
    That same day, Lewis ascends the final ridge toward the Continental Di
  • Experience with the Shoshone Tribe

    Experience with the Shoshone Tribe
    Having discovered a village of Shoshones, Lewis tries to negotiate for the horses he now knows are all-important to cross the daunting mountains. On this day, Clark and the rest of the expedition arrive and Sacagawea is brought in to help translate. Remarkably, the Shoshone chief, Cameahwait, turns out to be her brother. The captains name the spot Camp Fortunate.
  • A spot where the expedition experienced a peaceful trade exchange with a native tribe.

    A spot where the expedition experienced a peaceful trade exchange with a native tribe.
    Having discovered a village of Shoshones, Lewis tries to negotiate for the horses he now knows are all-important to cross the daunting mountains. On this day, Clark and the rest of the expedition arrive and Sacagawea is brought in to help translate. Remarkably, the Shoshone chief, Cameahwait, turns out to be her brother. The captains name the spot Camp Fortunate.
  • experience that occurred in present day Idaho

    experience that occurred in present day Idaho
    Having raced down the Clearwater, then the Snake rivers, they reach the Columbia. The river teems with salmon – Clark estimates 10,000 pounds of salmon drying in one village – but the men want meat to eat, so they buy dogs from the Indians.
  • An experience at Fort Clatsop

    An experience at Fort Clatsop
    An entire continent between them and home, the expedition celebrates Christmas in its new quarters, Fort Clatsop, named for a neighboring Indian tribe. The captains hand out handkerchiefs and the last of the expedition’s tobacco supply as presents.
  • An incident where someone from the expedition killed a person from a native tribe.

    An incident where someone from the expedition killed a person from a native tribe.
    Heading back toward the Missouri, Lewis sees eight Blackfeet warriors. They camp together warily, but the morning of the 27th the explorers catch the Blackfeet trying to steal their horses and guns. In the fight that follows, two Blackfeet are killed – the only act of bloodshed during the entire expedition. Lewis leaves a peace medal around the neck of one of the corpses “that they might be informed who we were.” The explorers gallop away, riding for 24 straight hours, meet the group with the ca