Union and rebel flag

Civil War Timeline

  • Period: to

    Civil War and Aftermath

  • Uncle Tom’s Cabin—Date Published

    Uncle Tom’s Cabin—Date Published
    Harriet Beecher Stowe's Book (Uncle Tom's Cabin) is often credited with being one of the driving forces behind the American Civil War. The Southern states often times attempted to ban the book because it showed the terrible conditions many slaves lived in. Many Northerners who read the book finally saw the attrocities of slavery and thus a split between North and South was formed.
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin- Date Published

    Uncle Tom's Cabin- Date Published
    "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Welcome to the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center. Harriet Beecher Stowe Center. Web. 15 Feb. 2012. http://www.harrietbeecherstowecenter.org/utc/. Millner, Elliot. Uncle Tom's Cabin. Digital image. Http://blackbloggers.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/the-reality-of-uncle-toms-cabin-why-reading-is-fundamental/. Blackbloggers-Wordpress. Web. 16 Feb. 2012. http://blackbloggers.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/the-reality-of-uncle-toms-cabin-why-reading-is-fundamental/.
  • Kansas-Nebraska Act

    Kansas-Nebraska Act
    Largely for personal gain, Senator Stephen Douglas introduced this act in the January of 1854. This act called for popular sovereignty over slavery in the Nebraska and Kansas territory (thus removing the issue of Free/Slave from the Federal Government). The act, once passed, caused many Northernerns and Southerners to rush into the territory in order to vote "Free" or "Slave". This act also led to some of the first acts of violence leading up to the war.
  • Kansas- Nebraska Act

    Kansas- Nebraska Act
    Mitchell, Jr, S. Augustus. Antique Maps of Kansas. Digital image. Http://www.philaprintshop.com/kansas.html. Web. 16 Feb. 2012. "Our Documents - Home." Welcome to OurDocuments.gov. Our Documents.gov. Web. 16 Feb. 2012. http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true.
  • Dred Scott decision

    Dred Scott decision
    A landmark court decision that ended in the rjustices of the supreme court decding 7-2 against Dred Scott and his family earning their freedom (despite several laws that should have allowed the family to go free due to their time spent in free states). This case marked the second time the Supreme Court would use judicial review to overturn Federal Law. This decision created immense political tension and contributed further to the division between North and South leading up to the Civil War.
  • Dred Scott decision

    Dred Scott decision
    Konkoly, Toni. Dred Scott. Digital image. Supreme Court Law. PBS. Web. 16 Feb. 2012. <www.pbs.org>. Konkoly, Toni. "The Supreme Court . Law, Power & Personality . Famous Dissents . Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857) | PBS." PBS: Public Broadcasting Service. PBS. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/personality/landmark_dred.html.
  • Election of 1860

    Election of 1860
    The election of 1860 ended with the election of Abraham Lincoln but showed very explicitly the severance between North and South. Although Lincoln won he did so without a SINGLE vote from any Southern (Slave) states. Another factor that contributed to the Republican victory is the division of voters between Democrats who divided their votes between Stephen Douglas and John Breckenridge. This election led to the secession of some Southern States (South Carolina first).
  • Election Of 1860

    Election Of 1860
    Election Of Lincoln. Digital image. Www.MrNussbaum.com. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. "The Election of 1860." Tulane University. Tulane University. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. http://www.tulane.edu/~latner/Background/BackgroundElection.html.
  • Confederate States of America Formed

    Confederate States of America Formed
    Confederate States of America. Digital image. Http://www.pfiwestern.com/pfi/western.wear/itemdetl.html?item=61548P. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. "The Confederate States of America." The American Civil War Home Page. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. http://www.civilwarhome.com/csa.htm.
  • Confederate States of America Formed

    Confederate States of America Formed
    The first (and only) President of the Confederate States of America, Jefferson Davis, was sworn in to office in Montgomery, Georgia, on the 18th of February, 1861. This marked the total severance of the South from the North in the United States. This also marked the start of a long road that would lead a nation through a costly war of "brother against brother" fighting. The new capital of the Confederate States would be Richmond,Virginia,and they would have their own version of the Constitution.
  • Emancipation Proclamation

    Emancipation Proclamation
    After the Union victory at the battle of Antietam, Abraham Lincoln presented a dcree to the Confederate states that basically said if they did not re-join the Union before January 1st then all slaves within those states would be declared free. This did not entirely come true but on the first of the year the Emancipation Proclamation became official: freeing all slaves within Union-controlled states. This did not affect border states because Lincoln still needed their support in the war.
  • Emancipation Proclamation

    Emancipation Proclamation
    Emancipation Proclamation. Digital image. Http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/emancipation-proclamation-1863. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. "The Emancipation Proclamation." PBS.org. PBS. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Gettysburg Address

    Gettysburg Address
    Perhaps one of the most famous speeches Lincoln ever gave, the Gettysburg Address dedicated part of the battlefield as a cemetary to the lives lost there.Besides this, however, the speech presented Lincoln's idea that the nation was still unified in some way.The battle of Gettysburg itself was the major turning point of the Civil War and Lincoln's famous, patriotic lines served to inspire the living by honoring the actions of the many soldiers who had already died for what they believed in.
  • Gettysburg Address

    Gettysburg Address
    Longstreet's Assault. Digital image. Gettysburg-The War Still Rages On. World Nexus Publications. Web. 21 Feb. 2012. <WNP>. "Gettysburg Address Abraham Lincoln Civil War Speech." American Civil War History Timelines Battle Map Pictures. AmericanCivilWar.com. Web. 21 Feb. 2012. http://americancivilwar.com/north/lincoln.html.
  • Freedman’s Bureau Founded

    Freedman’s Bureau Founded
    Founded in 1865 the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned lands' primary task was to help Southern states make the transition from a slavery-based society to a freedom-based one. The primary thing the Bureau did was help people find jobs and help educate African Americans. Another function of the Bureau was to help end hostilities between Whites and Blacks in the South but due to a lack of political support this goal was never achieved; the Bureau cut all operations in 1872.
  • Freedman's Bureau Founded

    Freedman's Bureau Founded
    Smith Family. Digital image. Www.archives.gov. Government Archives. Web. 21 Feb. 2012. Wormser, Richard. "The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow." PBS. PBS. Web. 21 Feb. 2012. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories_events_freed.html.
  • Appomattox Courthouse Surrender

    	Appomattox Courthouse Surrender
    The signing of surrender papers by Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at the battle of Appomattox Courthouse marked the basic end of the Civil War. General Lee, while attempting to escape Union forces and ressuply his army, wound up surrounded on three sides and was forced to give in to the Union pressure. This broke the back of the South's last major army and forced the Confederacy to submit to the Union unconditionally.
  • Appamattox Courthouse Surrender

    Appamattox Courthouse Surrender
    Signing Surrender Papers. Digital image. Http://civilwarss.com/tag/appomattox-courthouse-civil-war/. CivilWarsS. Web. 22 Feb. 2012. "Civil War Trust." The Battle of Appomattox Court House Summary & Facts. Google & History Channel. Web. 22 Feb. 2012. http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/appomattox-courthouse.html.
  • Lincoln’s Assassination

    Lincoln’s Assassination
    At the Ford Theatre on the night of April 14th, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by actor John Wilkes Booth. Booth came up from behind Lincoln and fired a shot into the back of his head before anyone had time to react or stop him. Booth escaped the theater with a broken leg (which was later treated by Dr. Samuel Mudd) but was later caught by U.S. authorities and shot after being surrounded in a barn ( that was set ablaze).
  • Lincoln's Assassination

    Lincoln's Assassination
    President Lincoln's Assassination. Digital image. Http://www.abrahamlincolnsclassroom.org/Library/newsletter.asp?ID=14&CRLI=91. Library of Congress. Web. 22 Feb. 2012. "President Lincoln's Assassination." Abraham Lincoln's Classroom. The Lehrman Institute. Web. 22 Feb. 2012.
  • 13th Amendment Ratified

    13th Amendment Ratified
    The 13th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America completely and finally abolished slavery in the nation. This amendment also abolished slavery anywhere within the U.S.'s jurisdiction. More than any other document, this document truely marked the end of an era in the South and the movement for equal rights for African Americans. This document also marked a final "end" of the Civil War; more so than the assassination of President Lincoln.
  • 13th Amendment Ratified

    13th Amendment Ratified
    Freedom Week Newsletter. Digital image. Http://freedomweek.wordpress.com/. Wordpress. Web. 22 Feb. 2012. "13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: Abolition of Slavery." America's Historical Documents. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. Web. 22 Feb. 2012. http://www.archives.gov/historical-docs/document.html?doc=9.
  • 14th Amendment Ratified

    14th Amendment Ratified
    The 14th amendment to the Constituition provided three major things to African Americans/ Americans as a whole: equal protection of the law, citizenship, and due process. With this Amendment in place, African Americans were able to make progress towards being equal with their white counterparts despite continued racism. The right of African Americans to hold office and vote would not come until the 15th amendment a few years later.
  • 14th Amendment Ratified

    14th Amendment Ratified
    14th Amendment. Digital image. Http://newspaper.li/14th-amendment/. Web. 22 Feb. 2012. Elbel, Fred. "The 14th Amendment." To the United States Constitution. Elbel Consulting Services, LLC. Web. 23 Feb. 2012. http://www.14thamendment.us/.
  • 15th Amendment-- February 3, 1870.

    15th Amendment-- February 3, 1870.
    The 15th amendment to the Constitution, to many, fufilled all rights that the Civil War had promised to African Americans. This amendment made the provision that all men (regardless of race) had the right to vote. The only flaw in this was that it could hardly be enforced in the South due to White oppression of African Americans and organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan. Still, this amendment was an important step towards equality in America.
  • 15th Amendment Ratified

    15th Amendment Ratified
    15th Amendment. Digital image. Http://www.proprofs.com/flashcards/cardshowall.php?title=amendment-supreme-court-flashcards. ProProfs.com. Web. 22 Feb. 2012. "15th Amendment." Our Documents -. Milestone Documents. Web. 22 Feb. 2012. http://ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true.
  • Election of 1876 (Compromise of 1877)

    Election of 1876 (Compromise of 1877)
    Despite candidate Samuel Tilden having 184 of the 185 electoral votes needed to win the Election of 1876, Rutherford B. Hayes became President. Many believed that a deal had been made to electe Hayes as Tilden also led the popular vote. Haye's victory was mostly dependant on the states of South Carolina, Florida, and Louisiana. The Compromise of 1877 made to elect Hayes involved Federal troop withdrawal from the South. This marked the end of Reconstruction.
  • Election of 1876 (Compromise of 1877)

    Election of 1876 (Compromise of 1877)
    The Election of 1876. Digital image. Xtimeline. Famento, Inc. Web. 23 Feb. 2012. "Digital History." Digital History. Digital History. Web. 23 Feb. 2012. http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=139.