1st Amendment Project

Timeline created by nealpardiwala
  • Schneck V. United States

    Schneck V. United States
    Charles Schneck produced flyers to resist the draft and was convicted under the Espionage Act of 1917. The Supreme Court then made a verdict that Schneck was in the right and if in conviction would result in a clear violation of his First Amendment rights.
  • Frohwerk v. United States

    Frohwerk v. United States
    Frohwerk spread a German-language newspaper called the Missouri Staats Zeitung, which published articles mocking the US's involvement in World War I. Frohwerk was charged with violating the Espionage Act of 1917
  • Terminiello v. City of Chicago

    Terminiello v. City of Chicago
    Arthur Terminello gave a speech to the Christian Veterans of America in which he condemned various racial and political groups. Shortly after, he was arrested. Justice William O. Douglas said in the decision May 16, 1949, that the “function of free speech … is to invite dispute
  • Barenblatt V. United States

    Barenblatt V. United States
    Barenblatt refused to answer questions about his religious and political beliefs, and Congress found him in contempt for impeding the investigation. The Supreme Court then ruled that his first amendment rights were not violated
  • Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District

    Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District
    Mary Beth Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt wore black armbands to school in protest of the Vietnam War. As a result, the students and their parents sued the school district for violating their First Amendment rights. The Supreme Court ruled in the students’ favor, stating that schools cannot censor students’ rights to freedom of speech and expression.
  • Stanley v. Georgia

    Stanley v. Georgia
    Eli Stanley was convicted of owning pornographic material in his home when Police did a search through his home in suspect of bookmaking. Stanley was convicted for possession of obscene material. Justice Thurgood Marshall then declared that a man can watch or read whatever he may please in the comfort of his own home.
  • Street V. New York

    Street V. New York
    Sidney Street burned a 48-star flag after hearing news of the attempted murder of civil rights leader James Meredith.
  • Red Lion Broadcasting Co. v. Federal Communications Commission

    Red Lion Broadcasting Co. v. Federal Communications Commission
    Red Lion challenged the FCC in its television broadcasting doctrine. The Supreme Court found that challenging the fairness doctrine does not violate the First Amendment.
  • Texas V. Johnson

    Texas V. Johnson
    Greg Johnson burned a U.S flag in front of a building to represent President Reagan's career so far. Johnson was convicted but, the Supreme Court overruled that conviction due to how it would have violated his rights to speech and opinion.
  • Guiles v. Marineau

    Guiles v. Marineau
    A student at a middle school was wearing a shirt that condescended president bush at the time and called him a Chicken in chief and also accused bush of drug usage. the student was forced to remove the shirt by the school as it was inappropriate. The court decided that making him remove the shirt was a clear violation of his First and Fourteenth Amendment rights.