Lg activism

NOTEWORTHY EVENTS FROM THE “ERA OF ACTIVISM” 1960 - 1975 Alleda

By roseb3
  • Publication of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring

    Publication of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring
    Is a book written by Rachel Carson and published by Houghton Mifflin on 27 September 1962. The book is widely credited with helping launch the environmental movement.
  • Publication of Betty Friedan’s Feminine Mystique

    Publication of Betty Friedan’s Feminine Mystique
    The Feminine Mystique is often credited with sparking the "second wave" of American feminism in the twentieth century.
  • Publication of Ralph Nader’s Unsafe at Any Speed

    Publication of Ralph Nader’s Unsafe at Any Speed
    Published in 1965, is a book detailing resistance by car manufacturers to the introduction of safety features, like seat belts, and their general reluctance to spend money on improving safety. It was a pioneering work, openly polemical but containing substantial references and material from industry insiders. It made Nader a household name.
  • Congress passes the Clean Air Act

    Congress passes the Clean Air Act
    This act dealt with reducing air pollution by setting emissions standards for stationary sources such as power plants and steel mills. It did not take into account mobile sources of air pollution which had become the largest source of many dangerous pollutants. Once these standards were set, the government also needed to determine deadlines for companies to comply with them. Amendments to the Clean Air Act were passed in 1965, 1966, 1967, and 1969. These amendments authorized the Secretary of He
  • NOW is founded

    NOW is founded
    Is the largest feminist organization in the United States. It was founded in 1966 and has a membership of 500,000 contributing members. The organization consists of 550 chapters in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.
  • UFW’s Nationwide Boycott of grapes picked on nonunion farms

    UFW’s Nationwide Boycott of grapes picked on nonunion farms
    The UFW's first target was the grape growers of California. Chávez, like Martin Luther King, Jr., believed in nonviolent action. In 1967, when growers refused to grant more pay, better working conditions, and union recognition, Chávez organized a successful nationwide consumer boycott of grapes picked on nonunion farms. Later boycotts of lettuce and other crops also won consumer support across the country
  • Woodstock

    Woodstock
    Was a music festival, billed as "An Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music". It was held at Max Yasgur's 600-acre (2.4 km²; 240 ha, 0.94 mi²) dairy farm near the hamlet of White Lake in the town of Bethel, New York, from August 15 to August 18, 1969. Bethel, in Sullivan County, is 43 miles (69 km) southwest of the town of Woodstock, New York, in adjoining Ulster County.
  • First Earth Day Celebration

    First Earth Day Celebration
    Is a day that is intended to inspire awareness and appreciation for the Earth's natural environment.
  • The EPA is established

    The EPA is established
    The official birthday of EPA is December 2, 1970. Like any other birth, EPA's needed progenitors, and a family tree stretching back for years. Surely no factor was more pivotal in the birth of EPA than decades of rampant and highly visible pollution. But pollution alone does not an agency make. Ideas are needed--better yet a whole world view--and many environmental ideas first crystallized in 1962.
  • Supreme Court rules to legalize abortion in the Roe v. Wade case

    Supreme Court rules to legalize abortion in the Roe v. Wade case
    The Court decided that a right to privacy under the due process clause in the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution extends to a woman's decision to have an abortion, but that right must be balanced against the state's two legitimate interests for regulating abortions: protecting prenatal life and protecting the mother's health.
  • Protesters from the AIM take over the reservation at Wounded Knee

    Protesters from the AIM take over the reservation at Wounded Knee
    On Feb. 27, 1973, traditional members of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux) tribe and activists from the American Indian Movement (AIM) occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota, a protest designed to draw attention to the deplorable living conditions on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and the corrupt rule of Richard Wilson, head of the tribal council. The site of a terrible massacre of Lakota Indians in 1890, Wounded Knee was chosen for its symbolic importance and because the activists hoped the