Interactive Whiteboard Research

Timeline created by ianinsheffield
  • Running with Technology: the pedagogic impact of the large-scale introduction of interactive whiteboards in one secondary school

    This was a case study of an extensive IWB initiative in a single school, so might not lend the conclusions to extrapolation. Despite good intentions, the technology appeared underused and underdeveloped. but there was a recognition that “pedagogic change is essential for the efficient and effective use of new technology.” Interesting to note also that the capabilities and attitudes of the staff, appeared to confirm Rogers’ adoption distribution.
    Glover, D., Miller, D., 2001. Running with techno
  • Missioners, tentatives and luddites: leadership challenges for school and classroom posed by the introduction of interactive whiteboards into schools in the UK.

    This conference paper sees the introduction of IWBs as a case study in how to manage technological change in schools. Exploring how IWBs enhance or inhibit teaching in a range of schools and subjects and evolving teacher attitudes to IWBs, the findings classify teachers into the three eponymous groups. Glover, D., Miller, D., 2001. Missioners, tentatives and luddites: leadership challenges for school and classroom posed by the introduction of interactive whiteboards into schools in the UK.,
  • Why Use an Interactive Whiteboard?A Baker’s Dozen Reasons!

    Although an opinion piece rather than peer-reviewed research, this article brings to the fore several aspects of the IWB missing from other research, notably the ways in which ‘touch’ can be exploited and of potential use and as an adjunct with other peripherals. Bell, M.A., 2002. Why Use an Interactive Whiteboard? A Baker’s Dozen Reasons! Teachers.Net Gazette 3.
  • How is the Interactive Whiteboard being used in the primary school and how does this affect teachers and teaching?

    This detailed report (for an Ed D thesis) of a small-scale study was a precursor to many subsequent studies in suggesting teacher practice was unchanged, but interestingly noted that this might ease the process of change involved in assimilating a new technology. It also enabled teachers to retain control of the teaching situation, ensuring they kept within their comfort zone. Cogill, J., 2002. How is the interactive whiteboard being used in the primary school and how does this affect teachers?
  • Learning from the bottom up–the contribution of school basedpractice and research in the effective use of interactive whiteboards for the FE/HE sector

    A discussion paper which proposes that the IWB adoption by schools could largely be classified as ‘infusion’ (on Gibson’s 3-phase scale), with some evidence of ‘integration, but with little evidence of ‘transformation.’ Similarly when addressing learning through IWB use, most is ‘shallow,’ a little ‘deep’ and no evidence of ‘profound.’ This whilst acknowledging that IWB adoption is still very much in its infancy and transition through the aforementioned stages may progress further.
    Burden, K.,
  • Student Engagement, Visual Learning and Technology: Can Interactive Whiteboards Help?

    Action research project in a single school surveying teacher and student attitudes to the use of IWBs which found that they increased student engagement. Beeland, W.D., 2002. Student engagement, visual learning and technology: Can interactive whiteboards help, in: Annual Conference of the Association of Information Technology for Teaching Education
  • The Introduction of Interactive Whiteboards into Schools in the United Kingdom: Leaders, Led, and the Management of Pedagogic and Technological Change

    Following on from their ‘Missioners…” study, this article summarised the leadership elements associated with IWB implementation projects, finding “...the interplay between leadership and classroom teachers is the force that conditions the pace, extent, and impact of change.”
    Glover, D., Miller, D., 2002. The Introduction of Interactive Whiteboards into Schools in the United Kingdom: Leaders, Led, and the Management of Pedagogic and Technological Change, 6 (24). IEJLL
  • Interactive Whiteboards in learning and teaching in two Sheffield schools

    Summary of action research projects carried out across two schools, focussing on teaching from teachers’ perspectives & learning from students’. Early in IWB lifetimes, this study pulls out several general observations on the technical and resource aspects, support and training. Findings specifically related to L&T are tentative, suggestive and early indicators only, mainly attending to factors concerned with student engagement.
    Levy, P., 2002. Interactive Whiteboards in learning and teaching in
  • The educational effects and implications of the interactive whiteboard strategy of Richardson primary school

    An in-depth case study of a single Australian school which focused its ICT strategy around IWBs. An observational report rather than a formal academic study.
    Although learning outcomes are broadly unchanged, the rate at which they are realised has increased. Teachers using IWBs report a rapid and dramatic change to their pedagogy, though the report fails to note how teachers arrived at this point. Lee, M., Boyle, M., 2003. The educational effects and implications of the interactive whiteboard s
  • e-Teaching – The Elusive Promise

    In a follow-up to the Richardson study, this conference paper outlines the changes in pedagogical approach (e-Teaching) required to capitalise on the affordances of the technology to amplify teachers’ professional skills. Kent, P., 2004. E-teaching-the elusive promise, in: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference. pp. 1766–1771.
  • Panacea or prop: the role of the interactive whiteboard in improving teaching effectiveness

    A preliminary report on how a group of secondary school maths teachers drawn from 11 schools were utilising resources developed for use with IWBs to enhance their teaching and their students’ learning. The student perspective suggested that the IWBs made lessons more stimulating, but largely where teachers had become adept and confident in their use … however this might have been achieved (degree of exposure, commitment, level of access etc). Glover, D., Miller, D., Averis, D., 2004. Panacea or
  • Collaborative research methodology for investigating teaching and learning the use of interactive whiteboard technology

    Case study approach of four schools in which teachers volunteered to act as co-researchers exploring the affordances of IWBs using lesson video-capture and subsequent analysis.
    Long-term, sustained access to the technology together with training and continued in-service support appear to be crucial elements for ensuring the affordances are fully exploited. Armstrong, V., Barnes, S., Sutherland, R., Curran, S., Mills, S., Thompson, I., 2005. Collaborative research methodology for investigating t
  • From Technology to Professional Development

    The focus here was on the experiences of ITE PGCE students specializing in Maths or MFL using multiple methods. Amongst many findings, it was clear that student teachers’ development with IWBs depends largely on their exposure and the support they receive in partner schools. For a variety of reasons, they receive very little training from their ITE institution. Miller, D., Glover, D., Averis, D., Door, V., 2005. From technology to professional development: How can the use of an IWB
  • Seeing the meaning. The impact of interactive whiteboards on teaching and learning

    This conference paper synthesises findings from small-scale case studies and literature reviews to propose that IWBs have changed the ecology of the classroom, provided the means for ICT to influence whole-class teaching and accommodate different approaches encompassing different theories of learning. Cuthell, J.P., 2005. Seeing the meaning. The impact of interactive whiteboards on teaching and learning, in: Proceedings of WCCE.
  • Interactive whole class teaching and interactive white boards

    This discussion of how interactivity might actually be construed and how IWBs could facilitate that reflects the research to that point, from which it is proposed that teachers and students utilise only the surface features of interaction (associated with pace, motivation, engagement & involvement) and that at this level, it is not clear whether improvements in attainment and learning will be realised. Tanner, H., Jones, S., Kennewell, S., Beauchamp, G., 2005. Interactive whole class teaching a
  • Interactive whiteboards: boon or bandwagon? A critical review of the literature

    This literature review bemoans the dearth of rigorous, academic research undertaken at the time, whilst acknowledging that this technology is still in its infancy. It identifies that usage often reinforces traditional practice and often fails to exploit interactivity, going on to suggest that realising the potential the IWB offers for technical and pedagogic interaction remains to be achieved. Smith, H.J., Higgins, S., Wall, K., Miller, J., 2005. Interactive whiteboards: boon or bandwagon?
  • Primary school students’ perceptions of interactive whiteboards

    A small scale qualitative study involving 12 group interviews with Y6 students. “Problems with IWBs identified by students in the current study may be short-term in nature i.e. ‘teething
    troubles’, and ‘suggest a state of imbalance, a sense of a work still in progress rather than nearing completion.’ ‘...the concept of ‘interactivity’ has not been accurately and perhaps more importantly operationally defined, which in itself must be problematic for teachers’
    Hall, I., Higgins, S., 2005.
  • Investigating the Use of InteractiveWhiteboard Technology in the English Language Classroom through the Lens of a Critical Theory of Technology

    Adopting the ‘critical theory of technology’ approach which sees technology usage as socially constructed, this qualitative investigation explored IWB usage in HE with EFL students and as such provided a different perspective to other contemporary studies. The degree to which dialogic interaction is crucial in moving beyond replication of old methods formed the main finding (with the exploration of the critical theory approach taking centre stage)
    Schmid, E.C., 2006. Investigating the use of in
  • Reflections on the interactive whiteboard phenomenon: a synthesis of research from the UK

    The findings are consistent in describing little pedagogical change suggesting a lack of targeted professional development. Research to date almost exclusively focuses on whole-class teaching, leaving other aspects of classroom practice using IWBs still in need of exploration, like the act of physically touching the board or students working at the front rather than their seat.
    Kennewell, S., 2006. Reflections on the interactive whiteboard phenomenon: a synthesis of research from the UK
  • The impact of interactive whiteboards on teacher-pupilinteraction in the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies

    This comparative study examined whether differences existed between literacy/numeracy lessons (184 in all) delivered with and without an IWB. The findings suggest that IWBs are having some impact within the classroom (more open questioning, faster pace, greater frequency of response), but that this “technology by itself will not bring about fundamental change in the traditional patterns of whole class teaching”
    Smith, F., Hardman, F., Higgins, S., 2006. The impact of interactive whiteboards on
  • Tools for Transformation: The Impact of Interactive Whiteboards in a range of contexts

    Report from year 1 of a 3 year longitudinal study across 3 countries involving 6 universities, >1500 students, 60 teachers and assorted other interested parties. Emergent findings include increased motivation in staff and students, increases in understanding and implementation of elearning, student attendance has improved.
    Cuthell, J., 2006. Tools for Transformation: The Impact of Interactive Whiteboards in a range of contexts, in: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education Internl
  • Use of the interactive whiteboard in constructivist teaching for higher student achievement

    Comparative study exploring whether the use of IWBs in a constructivist teaching environment effects higher student achievement than in a traditional environment in a school in Brunei. The difference in the pre- & post-test results indicated that students in the constructivist environment outperformed their peers in the traditional environment.
    Dhindsa, H.S., Emran, S.H., 2006. Use of the interactive whiteboard in constructivist teaching for higher student achievement, in: Proceedings of the Sec
  • Evaluation report of the Primary Schools Whiteboard Expansion Project

    An extensive multi-method study of this major national project found that the attainment of primary school children was improved through the use of IWBs (though not for pupils of lower attainment), across core subjects (although to different extents), especially where the IWB became embedded in practice by teachers with sustained usage and personal development. Somekh, B.et al, 2007. Evaluation report of the Primary Schools Whiteboard Expansion Project. MMU.
  • Do whiteboards have a future in the UK classroom?

    This review of the literature suggests that the jury is still out on whether IWBs enjoy universal impact. There are instances where attainment is increased, motivation and engagement are invariably improved, yet there is very little change in pedagogic practice and there are still many challenges to be faced, especially in the area of teacher development. Rudd, T., 2007. Do whiteboards have a future in the UK classroom? Futurelab.
  • Exploring pedagogy with interactive whiteboards

    Exploring how IWBs affect pedagogy, this investigation was conducted as a series of case studies across 6 Australian schools spanning the K - 12 range. Themes emerging from the case studies included how significant school leadership and culture were in providing positive influences, students’ level of motivation and time spent ‘on-task’ increased, however little evidence of new pedagogies was apparent whilst traditional whole-class, teacher-directed approaches were reinforced. [Schuck, S., Kear](www.dec.nsw.gov.au/detresources/pedagogy_sVIYVjvNJH.pdf‎)
  • Interactivity and the digital whiteboard: weaving the fabric of learning

    Based on a case study project involving multi-method, qualitative and quantitative approaches, this journal article focuses on the classroom observations and teacher interviews to contest claims of earlier research that changes in practice are not found. This was enabled by adopting a more expansive interpretation of what constitutes interactivity and a deeper inspection of microlearning events and how they impact the development of tacit knowledge. Haldane, M., 2007. Interactivity and the digi
  • The Interactive Whiteboards, Pedagogy and Pupil Performance Evaluation

    In a wide-ranging, mixed methods analysis of an extensive IWB implementation project across London, the data were far from conclusive in many regards, but were unequivocal in finding no link between increased number of IWBs and improved pupil attainment (in the 3 core subjects). There was no evidence of wide-scale change in pedagogy, beyond those individuals with a high degree of commitment. The capacity to fit existing practices could be viewed as both a benefit and a hindrance. Moss, G., Jewi
  • Pedagogical strategies for using the interactive whiteboard to foster learner participation in school science

    Exploring development of pedagogy, this case study investigated the approaches of experienced science teachers in 4 schools using a mixed methods approach. “Teachers maintained control of the content, pace and structure of the lesson at all times. … existing pedagogical approaches and thinking appeared to shape IWB use. Practice was developed by extensively ‘tweaking’ existing lesson plans to incorporate a wider range of more exciting and interactive media-rich content” Hennessy, S., Deaney, R.
  • Pedagogy and Interactive Whiteboards: Using an Activity Theory Approach to Understand Tensions in Practice

    A subset of a broader study into the use of ICTs to support mathematical learning, the IWB findings were drawn from 5 classrooms across two Australian middle schools. An analysis of ‘productive pedagogy’ found “the use of IWBs actually reduces the quality of mathematical learning opportunities, provides fewer opportunities for connecting to the world beyond schools, and offers little autonomous/independent learning opportunities for students.”
    Zevenbergen, R., Lerman, S., 2007.
  • Reviewing the literature on interactive whiteboards

    “...although the IWB may alter the way that learning takes place, and that the motivation of teachers and pupils may be increased, yet this may have no significant or measurable impact on achievement.” Higgins, S., Beauchamp, G., Miller, D., 2007. Reviewing the literature on interactive whiteboards. Learning, Media and technology 32, 213–225.
  • A ‘learning revolution’? Investigating pedagogic practice around interactive whiteboards in British primary classrooms

    Case study drawing on observational and interview data from four teachers in UK primary schools. The distinction between technical interactivity (facilitating speedy, smooth multimodal activity and transitions (e.g. cf earlier mechanisms for annotating or commenting on video) and pedagogic interactivity (“Teachers may use the IWB’s technical affordances effectively yet to support an established, conventional style of teaching.”) is made.
    [Gillen J.et al. 2007. A “learning revolution”? Investigati](www.educ.cam.ac.uk/research/projects/iwb/AERA2006.pdf‎)
  • Teaching and learning with an interactive whiteboard: a teacher's journey

    This self-study discovered that the IWB technology needed to be ‘tamed’ before the eacher could move forward and further exploit its potential. Early in the study, the IWB had a negative impact on her teaching as she found it moved her into a pedagogical approach which was in conflict with her philosophy of teaching. The increase in engagement could also be considered ‘enslavement’ leaving students increasingly less able to exercise self-actuation.
    Hodge, S., Anderson, B., 2007. Teaching and lea
  • Active Learning with IWBs

    One of few studies exploring IWB use with older students (from a US College in this case), but a small-scale study of a particular learning activity with freshman classes. The findings echo other studies, reporting increased student motivation and attention, together with improved affective learning, indicated by heightened emotions and general playfulness.
    Schroeder, R., 2007. Active learning with interactive whiteboards: A literature review and a case study for college freshmen.
  • Learner Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards in EFL Classrooms

    Students from several language centers in different parts of the world were asked about their opinion of learning in a class where an IWB is used.
    The results show a general appreciation of the introduction of new technology but suggest there is little in the way of an improved pedagogy being implemented that might immediately justify the investment.
    Orr, M., 2008. Learner Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards in EFL Classrooms. CALL-EJ Online 9.
  • Analysing the use of interactive technology to implement interactive teaching

    Discussion of the part played by IWBs in the pedagogical approach termed interactive teaching, followed by a case study of a single lesson. Focus is on the analytical and evaluative process more than the use of IWB technology so no surprise then that the findings suggest that the pedagogical interactivity is of more significance than technical interactivity in stimulating higher-order learning. Kennewell, S., Tanner, H., Jones, S., Beauchamp, G., 2008. Analysing the use of interactive technolo
  • Enabling enhanced mathematics teaching with interactive whiteboards

    A researcher-practitioner co-operative research study using literature searches and video capture and analysis. Teacher usage tended to be at lower levels on Blooms, teachers need continual PD to ensure their skills and competency improve, piecemeal introduction of IWBs affects outcomes and impact, lack of appropriate software and poor or insufficiently accommodating environments in which IWBs are used. Miller, D., Glover, D., Averis, D., 2008. Enabling enhanced mathematics teaching with intera
  • Interactive whiteboards: Real beauty or just ‘‘lipstick”?

    A feasibility study of one particular IWB technology on the potential for introducing pen technologies more widely in South Africa. The main benefits were from the large screen display, rather than interactive aspects, though teachers in this study were being required to make a large pedagogical ‘jump’ and the findings suggested evolution of their practice would be more wise. Slay, H., Siebörger, I., Hodgkinson-Williams, C., 2008. Interactive whiteboards: Real beauty or just “lipstick”? Compute
  • PowerPoint, interactive whiteboards, and the visual culture of technology in schools

    Arising from a wider ethnographic study of ICT use in one UK secondary school, this exploration considered IWBs as one element of presentation technologies. It found that visual technologies (PPT, IWB, projector & laptop) become conflated in the minds of students & teachers and the nuances of the individual tools become lost Reedy, G.B., 2008. PowerPoint, interactive whiteboards, and the visual culture of technology in schools. Technology, Pedagogy and Education 17, 143–162.
  • Embedding interactive whiteboards in teaching and learning: The process of change in pedagogic practice

    Mixed-methods case study over two years to evaluate impact of the Primary Schools Whiteboard Project. In addition to improved ICT skills in teachers and improved test scores in core subjects (over two years of IWB use), it was noted that only 2 of the 3 stages of pedagogic development were achieved. Lewin, C., Somekh, B., Steadman, S., 2008. Embedding interactive whiteboards in teaching and learning: The process of change in pedagogic practice. Education and Information Technologies 13, 291–303
  • Improving Student Engagement: Use of the Interactive Whiteboard as an Instructional Tool to Improve Engagement and Behavior in the Junior High School Classroom

    Study submitted as a doctoral thesis exploring student engagement across a population of >200 students in two US high schools. Results indicate that use of the interactive whiteboard as an instructional tool has a beneficial effect on student engagement in classroom lessons and leads to improved student behavior.
    This study was only during a 3 month period however Morgan, G.L., 2008. Improving Student Engagement: Use of the Interactive Whiteboard as an Instructional Tool to Improve Engagement a
  • Evaluation Study of the Effects of Promethean ActivClassroom on Student Achievement

    Quantitative comparative analysis using pretest and posttest data showing that student achievement is affected positively through the use of ActivClassroom and that this is most pronounced when the teacher is experienced (in teaching terms and with the technology), is a regular user of the technology and is a confident user. [Marzano, R.J., Haystead, M.W., 2009. Evaluation Study of the Effects of Promethean ActivClassroom on Student Achievement. Final Report. Marzano Research Laboratory.](Marzano, R.J., Haystead, M.W., 2009. Evaluation Study of the Effects of Promethean ActivClassroom on Student Achievement. Final Report. Marzano Research Laboratory.)
  • The effects of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) on student performance and learning: A literature review

    The findings from this review led the authors to propose a simple framework with which to consider the context and the outcomes of IWB usage. The framework explores the contextual factors within which IWBs are introduced (school culture, teacher training etc), how they influence level of interaction and pedagogical development to effect outcomes (socio-emotional, perception, learning & achievement).
    Digregorio, P., Sobel-Lojeski, K., 2009. The effects of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) on student
  • Using interactive whiteboards to orchestrate classroom dialogue

    A small-scale study of dialogic interactions of 3 teachers in UK K-12 settings.
    “It is clear from our study that the IWB allows a flexibility in the marshalling of resources that enables teachers to create interesting multimodal stimuli for wholeclass dialogue much more easily than do other technologies.”
    Mercer, N., Hennessy, S., Warwick, P., 2010. Using interactive whiteboards to orchestrate classroom dialogue. Technology, Pedagogy and Education 19, 195–209.
  • Effects of the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) in the Classroom

    Small-scale quantitative experimental study to explore whether IWBs enhance learning in an Italian primary school. Although this is simply a conference paper rather than the full study, it’s hard to verify the claim that the use of the IWB had positive effect on learning and retention, since the full picture was not available. Campregher, S., 2011. Effects of the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) in the Classroom, Experimental Research in Primary School. Free University of Bolzano (Italy), Retrieved
  • Using the Interactive Whiteboard in Teaching and Learning – An Evaluation of the SMART CLASSROOM Pilot Project

    Following a mixed methods approach, this extensive study of IWB implementation across 6 middle and 6 secondary schools in Israel largely confirmed findings from other studies i.e. that IWBs improve student motivation and engagement and that teacher development hadn’t moved beyond the technical skill acquisition phase into pedagogical development
    Manny-Ikan, E., Tikochinski, T.B., Zorman, R., Dagan, O., 2011. Using the Interactive White Board in Teaching and Learning - An Evaluation of the SMART
  • Bored or Board?

    Though only preliminary findings yet to be validated, this study confirms what others have found regarding teacher initial usage being at a low level, reinforcing traditional practice and closed forms of dialogue. Only when opportunities are provided for reflection and development of practice, can untapped potential begin to be released. Egeberg, G., Hatlevik, O.E., Wølner, T.A., Dalaaker, D., Pettersen, G.O., 2011. "Bored or Board? Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy 6, 102–113.
  • The Interactive Whiteboard And Foreign Language Learning: A Case Study

    This small-scale study of a single learning sequence in a Spanish primary school offered the IWB (with Internet connectivity through a PC/laptop) as an excellent resource bank which allows easy improvisation. Whilst the IWB saves time in lessons, preparation does take longer than it normally would. The IWB however appeared to magnify differences in student attentivity - if they were inattentive normally, this was even worse with the IWB.
    Duran, A., Cruz, M., 2011. The Interactive Whiteboard And
  • Competency Levels of Teachers in Using Interactive Whiteboards

    Study investigating Turkish primary school teachers’ perceptions and self-reported competencies towards IWB use in teaching. Teachers in this setting report lower levels of confidence and capability with IWBs than they have with other ICT tools, indicating the need for both awareness raising and appropriate training. Celik, S., 2012. Competency Levels of Teachers in Using Interactive Whiteboards. Contemporary Educational Technology 3, 115–129.
  • Teachers' Belief and Use of Interactive Whiteboards for Teaching and Learning.

    Following an extensive literature review, this study received responses from 174 teacher IWB-users in K6-12 schools in Turkey to an attitudinal questionnaire. Their impressions indicate successful integration of IWBs is possible provided they receive effective training on appropriate instructional strategies, they are able to collaborate with peers and they are able to enjoy frequent IWB access to develop competency. Türel, Y.K., Johnson, T.E., 2012. Teachers’ Belief and Use of IWBs
  • Reasons for using or not using interactive whiteboards:Perspectives of Taiwanese elementary mathematics andscience teachers

    Quantitative study to explore the reasons teachers in Taiwanese elementary schools do or don't use IWBs, using a framework drawn from the findings of earlier research. The most common reasons teachers give for adopting IWB use is in capturing student attention and deploying multi-modal resources. Jang, S.-J., Tsai, M.-F., 2012. Reasons for using or not using interactive whiteboards: Perspectives of Taiwanese elementary mathematics and science teachers. AJET 28, 1451–1465.
  • Using the interactive whiteboard to scaffold a metalanguage : teaching higher order thinking skills in preservice teacher education

    Case study of how preservice primary school teachers adapted their capability in teaching higher-order thinking skills, using the IWB as a support or scaffold. Echoing earlier studies, as the teachers’ comptency with the IWB improved, the likelihood of them adapting their pedagogy increased. Improved pupil (and teacher) motivation and engagement were in evidence and the IWB software helped structure and guide lesson preparation and delivery.
    Harrison, N., 2013. Using the interactive whiteboard t
  • Interactive Whiteboard factor in Education: Student’s points of view and their problems

    Small-scale descriptive study (2 schools, 8 classes) which repeats the findings of many earlier studies that IWBs increase motivation. In addition technical problems still abound which affect pace and continuity of learning. Aytaç, T., 2013. Interactive Whiteboard factor in Education: Student’s points of view and their problems. Educational Research and Reviews 8, 1907–1915.