WWII Timeline

Timeline created by lumartin
In History
  • Beer Hall Putsch

    Beer Hall Putsch
    Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party led a coalition group in an attempted coup d'état which came to be known as the Beer Hall Putsch. References:Ushmm.org,. 'Beer Hall Putsch (Munich Putsch)'. N.p., 2015. Web. 2 Mar. 2015. More info
  • Mussolini takes over Italy's Government

     Mussolini takes over Italy's Government
    At the end of 1922 Mussolini took control of the Italian government, saying that if they refused their demands he would openly force a coup to occure, that's how Mussolini took power in Italy. Sources:
  • Kellogg-Briand Pact

     Kellogg-Briand Pact
    As a result of Kellogg’s proposal, nearly all the nations of the world eventually subscribed to the Kellogg-Briand Pact, agreeing to renounce war as an instrument of national policy and to settle all international disputes by peaceful means. [Reference:](Encyclopedia Britannica,. 'Kellogg-Briand Pact | France-United States [1928]'. N.p., 2015. Web. 9 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • U.S. Stock Market Crash

    U.S. Stock Market Crash
    In 1929, a stock market crash caused the Dow Jones index -- one of the main indices used to evaluate the health of the American economy -- to lose nearly 12 percent of its value in one day. [Reference:](Clark, Josh. 'Can The Government Control A Stock Market Crash? - Howstuffworks'. HowStuffWorks. N.p., 2015. Web. 9 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Japan Invades Manchuria

    Japan Invades Manchuria
    Hungry for raw materials and pressed by a growing population, Japan initiated the seizure of Manchuria in September 1931 and established ex-Qing emperor Puyi as head of the puppet regime of Manchukuo in 1932. The loss of Manchuria, and its vast potential for industrial development and war industries, was a blow to the Nationalist economy. Sources:
  • Nazi's reach a political majority in Germany

    Nazi's reach a political majority in Germany
    A man like Hitler could have only have succeeded in country that was thoroughly Protestant (or godless) or else he would have been put down and strongly resisted. That was why the nazi's got so high in the polls was because the whole farming community that voted for them were protestants. Sources:
  • Hitler becomes Germany's Chancellor

     Hitler becomes Germany's Chancellor
    Hitler got elected for chancellor shortly after the president was inaugurated in the U.S. Hitler was also a close friend of Roosevelt's and he had known him for a while before he was elected as chancellor. [Reference:](Reformation.org,. 'Roosevelt And Hitler Unmaked At Last!!'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More Info:
  • Japan Withdraws from the League of Nations

    Japan Withdraws from the League of Nations
    Japan was an early flaunter of the League's ideals, conducting numerous military forays into China even though it was one of the league's four original council members. Japan itself would withdraw from the League of Nations in 1935 to pursue its own greater ambitions in the Far East. [Reference:](Beyondbandofbrothers.com,. 'League Of Nations'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • First Anti-Semitic Law is passed in Germany

    First Anti-Semitic Law is passed in Germany
    Soon after coming to power the Nazis enacted their first wave of anti-Jewish legislation which dealt with employment. For example "Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service" was enacted.This law provided for the dismissal of all "non-Aryan" civil servants. Also, on the same day, a law was enacted which denied admission to the bar to lawyers of "non-Aryan descent". Sources:
  • The night of the long knives (Rohm Purge)

    The night of the long knives (Rohm Purge)
    The Night of the Long Knives was a purge that took place in Nazi Germany from June 30 to July 2, 1934, when the Nazi regime carried out a series of political murders. [Reference:](End, Witt's. 'VA Viper: June 30, 1934 Was The Night Of The Long Knives, Hitler's Purge Of Those Standing In His Way'. Vaviper.blogspot.com. N.p., 2014. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Hitler openly announces to his cabinet he will defy the Treaty of Versailles

    Hitler openly announces to his cabinet he will defy the Treaty of Versailles
    Hitler remilitarized Germany in defiance of the Versailles Treaty that ended World War I. He rebuilt the German Navy, including a prohibited submarine fleet, created an air force, the Luftwaffe, and expanded the army well beyond the 100,000-man limit set by the Treaty of Versailles. Hitler reintroduced conscription in 1935, also in violation of the treaty. Sources:
  • Creation of the Nuremberg Laws

    Creation of the Nuremberg Laws
    The Nuremberg Laws of 1935 defined who was a Jew. It classified people with four German grandparents as German. [Reference:](Worldwar2headquarters.com,. 'German WWII Poster - Nuremberg Laws And Classification Of Jews'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Italy invades Ethiopia

     Italy invades Ethiopia
    Italy recognized the independence of Ethiopia but still retained much influence there because of her colonies in neighboring Eritrea and Italian Somaliland. Under Mussolini Italy began again to pressure Ethiopia. The border clash at Wal-Wal brought the struggle for influence there to world attention. [Reference:](Users.dickinson.edu,. 'Ethiopiaspeech'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Rape of Nanking

    Rape of Nanking
    Army officers competed against each other to see who could kill the most Chinese first. Thousands of women were gang-raped to death. All totaled, over 300,000 Chinese were brutally murdered during the first few weeks of the of the Japanese occupation of Nanking. Sources:
  • Germany Annexes Austria

     Germany Annexes Austria
    The Anschluss annexed Austria into Greater Germany. There was no fighting involved, due to a well-timed internal overthrow by the Austrian Nazi Party. Chancellor Kurt Schuschnigg had actually wanted to maintain Austria's independence.The Anschluss violated the Treaty of Versailles, but, thanks in part to the quarrelling between Britain and France, and the failure of The Stresa Front, nothing could be done about it. Sources:
  • Hitler demands the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia

     Hitler demands the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia
    Czechoslovakia "is within the jaws of restless new Germany, which only a few months ago seized the lands and people of neighboring Austria. [Refrence:](Xroads.virginia.edu,. 'Marching Toward War: Czechoslovakia'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Munich Conference

    Munich Conference
    The Munich Agreement was a bargain between Nazi Germany, and its allies, Italy, the Western Powers of France, and the United Kingdom. The bargain, or pact, allowed Germany to take over the borderlands of Czechoslovakia known as the Sudetenland. [Reference:](Munichagreement.erritouni.com,. 'Munich Agreement Of 1938'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Kristallnacht

    Kristallnacht
    On Kristallnacht and in the days which followed, hundreds of men from Würzburg and neighboring communities were imprisoned and tortured by the Gestapo. Some 300 Jewish men were deported to the Buchenwald and Dachau concentration camps. [Reference:](Yadvashem.org,. 'It Came From Within... Exhibition Marking The Events Of Kristallnacht'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Einstein’s letter to FDR, “The Manhattan Project”

    Einstein’s letter to FDR, “The Manhattan Project”
    Einstein was willing to write to the President.As a life-long pacifist,he opposed the making of weapons,but he could not allow the Nazis sole possession of such destructive power.
    His only objection was that Szilard's letter was long and somewhat awkward. He preferred a shorter message stressing the main points. Sources:
  • Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact

    Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact
    The German foreign minister, Joachim von Ribbentrop (third from right), watches his Soviet counterpart Vyacheslav Molotov (seated) sign the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of non-aggression on Aug. 23, 1939. Sources:
  • Nazi invasion of Poland

    Nazi invasion of Poland
    On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland. The Polish army was defeated within weeks of the invasion. From East Prussia and Germany in the north and Silesia and Slovakia in the south, German units, with more than 2,000 tanks and over 1,000 planes, broke through Polish defenses along the border and advanced on Warsaw in a massive encirclement attack. Sources:
  • Evacuation of Dunkirk

    Evacuation of Dunkirk
    On 10 May Hitler had launched his blitzkrieg against the Low Countries and France. By the end of the second week in May the French defences had been broken. [Reference:](Christianstogether.net,. 'Christians Together : The Miracle Of Dunkirk: 70 Years On'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • France Surrenders

    France Surrenders
    Hitler unleashes his blitzkrieg invasion of the Low Countries and France with a fury on May 10, 1940. Within three weeks, a large part of the British force, accompanied by some of the French defenders, is pushed to the English Channel and compelled to abandon the continent at Dunkirk. [Reference:](Invadefrance.us,. 'Invadefrance.US'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Battle of Britain

    Battle of Britain
    Britain’s air defence rested principally on the Royal Air Force. While Bomber Command and Coastal Command would both make a significant contribution to the Battle by attacking the German invasion preparations and airfields across the Channel, and the Army’s anti-aircraft guns would inflict losses on any raiders, only the pilots of Fighter Command, under Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Dowding, could meet the Luftwaffe head on. Sources:
  • The Tripartite Pact

    The Tripartite Pact
    Japan invaded the French Indochina Peninsula on September 22, and subsequently concluded the Tripartite Pact on September 27. At an Imperial conference, Foreign Minister Matsuoka, who supported the pact, explained that the alliance was concluded “to avoid further aggression,” and to fight against the United States with a “decisive attitude.” Sources:
  • Lend Lease Act

    Lend Lease Act
    It allowed the formally neutral United States to become, in Roosevelt’s words, the “arsenal of democracy” in the war against Nazi Germany. Hitler cited the act when he declared war on the United States on December 11. Read more: h [Reference:](Iipdigital.usembassy.gov,. 'Lend-Lease: Facts And Numbers | IIP Digital'. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Operation Barbarossa

    Operation Barbarossa
    Operation Barbarossa, beginning 22 June 1941, was the code name for Nazi Germany’s invasion of the Soviet Union during World War II. Over the course of the operation, about four million soldiers of the Axis powers invaded the USSR along a 2,900 km front, the largest invasion in the history of warfare. [Reference:](Matinsalo, Sauli. 'Operation Barbarossa, 1941'. Old Picz. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Bombing of Pearl Harbor

    Bombing of Pearl Harbor
    It’s estimated that around 1,000 veterans of World War II die every day. Some of those passing were on the Hawaiian island Oahu, Dec. 7, 1941. It was around 8 a.m. that Sunday morning when Japanese planes screamed out of the sky, hitting the U.S. airfields and the b [Reference:](Ashlock, Alex. 'Veteran Recalls Pearl Harbor Attack'. hereandnow. N.p., 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Creation of the United Nations

    Creation of the United Nations
    Prior to the formation of the United Nations a number of meetings and events helped set the stage for the creation of the new international organization. Forty-four United Nations and associated nations meeting in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, to discuss monetary stabilization as an aid to post-war trade. The United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference was held in July 1944. Sources:
  • The Wannsee Conference and the “Final Solution”

    The Wannsee Conference and the “Final Solution”
    Wannsee Conference, meeting of Nazi officials on January 20, 1942, in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee to plan the “final solution” to the so-called “Jewish question” . [Reference:](Encyclopedia Britannica,. 'Wannsee Conference | Germany [1942]'. N.p., 2013. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.)< More info:
  • Bataan Death March

    Bataan Death March
    The Bataan Death March was the forcible transfer, by the Imperial Japanese Army, of approximately 75,000 American and Filipino prisoners of war after the four-month Battle of Bataan in the Philippines during World War II. [Reference:](Tragedyofbataan.com,. 'Tragedy Of Bataan'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Doolittle Raid

    Doolittle Raid
    In January 1942, Gen. Henry "Hap" Arnold selected Lt. Col. James Doolittle to lead Special Aviation Project No. 1, the bombing of Japan. Doolittle, who enlisted in the Army in 1917, became a flying cadet and received his commission in 1918. [Reference:](Nationalmuseum.af.mil,. 'Factsheets : Doolittle Raid'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Battle of Midway

    Battle of Midway
    The "boss" and I had the dawn inner air patrol from 0400 until 0900. The engine of my plane didn't turn up properly, so I sat up there on the catapult for about ten minutes until the leads were dried off. I have explained this procedure in the section Launching and recovering the Curtiss "Seagull" SOC-1 Scout Seaplane. Sources:
  • Operation Torch

    Operation Torch
    The information gathered by Rygor’s men and associates proved important to the success of Operation Torch, the landings in North Africa, in November of 1942. [Reference:](Duvall, Robert. 'RYGOR: The Polish Spymaster - Life Through The Lens Of History'. Life through the Lens of History. N.p., 2014. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Island Hopping (date for Buna-Gona Campaign)

    Island Hopping (date for Buna-Gona Campaign)
    The United States began a series of attacks on islands in the South Pacific in an attempt to eliminate the Japanese. America only took out the key islands, before moving onto the next set of critical bases. [Reference:](History 12,. 'Island Hopping'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Battle of Stalingrad

    Battle of Stalingrad
    Battle of Stalingrad, (July 17, 1942–Feb. 2, 1943), successful Soviet defense of the city of Stalingrad (now Volgograd) in the Russian S.F.S.R. during World War II. Russians consider it to be the greatest battle of their Great Patriotic War, and most historians consider it to be the greatest battle of the entire conflict. Sources:
  • Operation Overlord and D-Day

    Operation Overlord and D-Day
    As the liberation of Europe from the Nazis began, more than 6000 ships carried 130,000 troops across the English Channel to five Normandy beaches. [Reference:](TheAustralian,. 'Our Australian Witnesses To The D-Day Horror'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Operation Valkyrie

    Operation Valkyrie
    July 20 was the closest attempt to assassinate Adolf Hitler inside his Wolf's Lair field headquarters in East Prussia. The plot that came to be known as Operation Valkyrie (originally meaning "chooser of the slain") was the culmination of the efforts of the German Resistance to overthrow the Nazi regime. [Reference:](Beyondbandofbrothers.com,. 'Operation Valkyrie'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Discovery of Majdanek

    Discovery of Majdanek
    July 23 marks one of the most important liberations of World War II. On that day in 1944, troops of the Soviet Second Tank Army liberated the Majdanek death camp near Lublin in Poland. [Reference:](Rt.com,. '​Lessons From The Liberation Of Majdanek'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Battle of the Bulge

     Battle of the Bulge
    “It was the coldest weather ever recorded in this part of Europe that December in Belgium,” Earle recalled. “We couldn’t get out of our foxholes except to treat a wounded soldier. We’d crawl out through the snow and treat the soldier as best we could and crawl back in our foxhole.” [Reference:](War Tales,. 'Medic Looks Back On Epic WWII Battle'. N.p., 2011. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • Hitler’s Suicide

    Hitler’s Suicide
    In 1945, the world was convinced that Adolf Hitler and his mistress Eva Braun had committed suicide in a Berlin bunker, though this theory lacked proper documentation and evidence. It wasn't long until flaws in the theory surfaced. As further historical research was conducted, rumors began to circulate that challenged the suicide theory with claims of Hitler's escape to Argentina - particularly with news of sightings of German U-boats off the Argentinean coast. Sources:
  • V-E Day

    V-E Day
    The war-weary British began to rejoice straight away rather than waiting for the official day of celebration on the 8th. There had been years of austerity and rationing: five inches of water for a bath, few eggs, no bananas and the motto 'make do and mend'. Sources:
  • Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
    The attacks – the only time nuclear weapons have ever been used in world history to date – killed tens of thousands of people and shocked the planet with the scale of their destruction. [Reference:](Ghosh, Palash. 'Were Hiroshima And Nagasaki Racist Acts?'. International Business Times. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • V-J Day

    V-J Day
    On Friday, 15 August 1945 Japan surrendered and the surrender documents were finally signed during a formal ceremony aboard the deck of the American battleship U.S.S. Missouri in Tokyo Bay (below) on the morning of 2 September 1945, officially ending the war. [Reference:](Pdxretro.com,. 'VJ-DAY ON THIS DATE IN 1945 | PDX RETRO'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info:
  • The Nuremberg Trials

    The Nuremberg Trials
    On the 11th March, 1938, Goering made two separate statements to M. Mastny, the Czechoslovak Minister in Berlin, assuring him that the developments then taking place in Austria would in no way have any detrimental influence on the relations between the German Reich and Czechoslovakia, and emphasised the continued earnest endeavour on the part of the Germans to improve those mutual relations. On the 12th March, Goering asked M. Mastny to call on him, and repeated these assurances. Sources:
  • The Japanese War Crime Trials

    The Japanese War Crime Trials
    All Japanese Class A war criminals were tried by the International Military Tribunal for the Far East (IMTFE) in Tokyo. The prosecution team consisted of justices from eleven Allied nations: Australia, Canada, China, France, Great Britain, India, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the Philippines, the Soviet Union and the United States of America. The Tokyo trial lasted from May 1946 to November 1948. Sources:
  • The Beginning of the Cold War

     The Beginning of the Cold War
    The end of World War II set the stage for the Cold War, the struggle between communism and capitalism that pitted East against West and pushed the world to the brink of nuclear war. [Reference:](Cnn.com,. 'The History Of The Cold War - CNN.Com'. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Mar. 2015.) More info: