Women's Roles in World War II

Timeline created by alyssa161
In History
  • Seneca Falls Convention

    Seneca Falls Convention
    The Seneca Falls Convention was the first time that women cam together to discuss their rights. During the convention, they discussed the civil, social, and religious state of women's rights. Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the convention. The Convention was held at the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, New York.
  • Women's Right to Vote

    Women's Right to Vote
    On June 4, 1919, the right for women to vote was passed by Congress. But not until August 18, 1920, was the amendment passed. The 19th amendment gave American women the right to vote.
  • World War II Started

    World War II Started
    World War II started after Adolf Hitler and the Nazis made an attack on Poland in 1939.
  • The Bombing of Pearl Harbor

    The Bombing of Pearl Harbor
    At 7:55 in the morning (Hawaii time), a Japanese bomber appeared above Oahu. This plane was followed by 360 other Japanese warplanes. They bombed the United States naval base in Peal Harbor, Oahu. Five of the United States battleships, three destroyers, seven ships were either sunk or damaged, and more than 200 aircrafts were destroyed in the bombing. 2,400 Americans were killed, and 1,200 were wounded. But thankfully, all three U.S. Pacific Fleet Carriers were out at sea.
  • The United States Joins The War

    The United States Joins The War
    The Pearl Harbor attack was a turning point for the United States. The U.S. did not want to join the war, but after their naval base in Oahu was bombed, they knew that they had to fight. The day after the bombing, President Roosevelt went to the Congress and asked for approval to join the war. Congress voted on it. The Senate vote results were 82 to 0. The House of Representatives voted 388 to 1. The United States had approval to join the war.
  • Women Take Over for the Men

    Women Take Over for the Men
    When the United States joined World War II, men had to leave their jobs to go fight in the war. When the men left, the women had to take over. Women became nurses, physicists, engineers, machine operators, maids, runners, drivers, chemists, typists, storage filers, doctors, inspectors, researchers, teachers, veterinarians, craftsmen, and secretaries. Women even came to Washington D.C. to help run the federal government. Women helped determine the outcome in the war.
  • Women Working in Factories

    Women Working in Factories
    Women also worked in many factories during World War II. The major factories were located in Washington State, San Francisco, and Long Beach California.
  • Advertisements and Campaigns Recruited Women Workers

    Advertisements and Campaigns Recruited Women Workers
    When the war started, men had to leave their jobs to go fight in the war. Women had to take over for their jobs. Advertisements and campaigns influenced women to take over for the men's jobs. Rosie the Riveter was a famous women image that influenced women that they could do just as much as men.
  • Women Help the Soldiers

    Women Help the Soldiers
    Women helped the troops and soldiers by raising money for war bonds, having blood drives, rolling bandages, and by hosting troops.
  • Women and the Atomic Bomb

    Women and the Atomic Bomb
    During World War II, scientists created an atomic bomb. The bomb was more powerful than any other weapon that was ever made. Only a small fraction of women worked at Los Alamos, New Mexico as scientists. Some women found themselves isolated from the rest of the world, while their husbands worked on the Manhattan project. Less than a dozen women had jobs that involved the science of the atomic bomb at Los Alamos. After the United States created an atomic bomb, they bombed Japan.
  • Congress Makes the Women's Auxiliary Corps Official

    Congress Makes the Women's Auxiliary Corps Official
    Eleanor Roosevelt and other women's groups urged the idea of a women's service branch in the army. That is part of the reason why the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps was put into action. The Women's Auxiliary Army Corps is an organization that works with the army. The organization provides defense knowledge, skill, and special training for women.
  • Women Accepted For Volunteer Emergency Service

    Women Accepted For Volunteer Emergency Service
    In the Navy, members of Women Accepted For Volunteer Emergency Service, also known as WAVES, held the same status as navy reserves. Also, they provided support nationally.
  • Women Working in Labor Unions

    Women Working in Labor Unions
    In 1943, over three million women worked in labor unions. In 1939, 800,000 women worked in the labor unions. There was a huge increase in women working in the labor unions from 1939 to 1943.
  • Women's Auxiliary Army Corps is Updated into the Women's Army Corps

    Women's Auxiliary Army Corps is Updated into the Women's Army Corps
    The Women's Auxiliary Army Corps is updated into the Women's Army Corps. Which has full military status. The members of the Women's Army Corps were known as WAC's. WAC's worked in more than 200 civilian jobs statewide. They also worked everywhere where World War II was taking place. The first director of the WAC's was a women from Texas that went by the name of Oveta Culp Hoppy. In the army, the women's branch was the Women's Army Corps.
  • Women in the United States Aircraft Industry

    Women in the United States Aircraft Industry
    More than 310,000 women worked in the United States Aircraft Industry. This was 65% of the industry's total workforce. In the previous wars, that number was just 1%.
  • Newspapers about Working Women

    Newspapers about Working Women
    In 1943, 20 stories were released in the Saturday Evening Post newspaper that featured women doing their work. Advertisements were also released to influence women to go to work.
  • Women Engaging in Work

    Women Engaging in Work
    By September, 1943, 46% of women between the age of 14 and 59, and 90% of healthy, single women between the age of 18 and 40, were involved in some type of work.
  • Companies Are Asked to Stop Recruiting Women Workers

    Companies Are Asked to Stop Recruiting Women Workers
    The government and industries started telling campaigns and advertisement companies that they need to stop influencing women to get a job. They asked them to stop recruiting women for jobs.
  • Working Wives

    Working Wives
    The number of wives working doubled during World War II. About one out of every four married women worked outside their home.
  • Women in the United States Armed Forces

    Women in the United States Armed Forces
    In World War II, 350,000 women served in the United States armed forces at home and internationally.
  • World War II Ends

    World War II Ends
    Before the war ended, the United States bombed the Japanese city of Hiroshima with an atomic bomb. But, Japan did not surrender. So, the United States bombed the city of Nagasaki. After that bombing, Japan surrendered. World War II ends after the United States bombed Japan a second time.
  • Women Fired From Their Jobs

    Women Fired From Their Jobs
    81% of the women working at the Springfield Arsenal, in Springfield, Massachusetts, said in a survey that they wanted to keep working after the war ended. But, a week after the war ended, all the women had been fired. Another survey in Detroit showed that 72% of women workers who had been fired, wanted to work, but could not find a job.
  • Jobs That Are Available For Women

    Jobs That Are Available For Women
    There were still some jobs that were available for women. But, it was very minimal. The jobs that were available after the war were low paying, and low status. Also, there was not a very big chance for advancing in those jobs.
  • Women's Revolution

    Women's Revolution
    The Women's Revolution was part of the Civil Rights Movement. The World War II women workers and their daughters were the women that helped the movement. Women have been fighting for their rights for a long time. Equal pay for women, better jobs, better teaching, and more women's rights all came out of the Women's Revolution. The Women's Revolution also influenced women to speak up for their rights. But, even after the revolution, women were not treated equally.
  • Equal Pay Act

    Equal Pay Act
    President John F. Kennedy ratified the Equal Pay Act. This act includes minimum wage laws, and equal men and women wages.
  • Women's Airforce Service Pilots

    Women's Airforce Service Pilots
    Women's airforce service pilots were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal.
  • Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Act

    Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Act
    President Obama signs the Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Act. The act states that if a company wants money from the government, then they have to show the government their information from the past three years. If the information shows that they are treating men and women equally, and their working conditions are safe, then the company will receive the money. But, if they do not treat their employees right, they will not receive the money.
  • President Donald Trump Revokes the Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Act

    President Donald Trump Revokes the Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Act
    Trump signs a executive order that revokes the Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Act. Trump's reasoning for revoking the act was that it costs the government money and it takes time to look through the company's paperwork and information. Trump is promising that he will "remove every job-killing regulations we can find."
  • Period: to

    The Number of Employed Women Increases

    In 1940-1944, the number of employed women increased from 12 million to 18.2 million.