US History

Timeline created by Josue Suave
In History
  • Expansionism

    the policy of territorial or economic growth
  • Monroe doctrine

    Monroe doctrine
    United States policy of opposing European colonialism in The Americas beginning in 1823
  • Homestead Act

    Homestead Act
    People where given land in the great plains.
  • 13th Amendment

    13th Amendment
    Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
  • 14th Amendment

    14th Amendment
    The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments.
  • Transcontinental Railroad Completed

    Transcontinental Railroad Completed
    Expanded to the west of the US.
  • Industrialization Begins to Boom

    Industrialization Begins to Boom
    industries develop
  • 15th Amendemnt

    15th Amendemnt
    The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
  • Boss Tweed rise at Tammany Hall

    Boss Tweed rise at Tammany Hall
    Tammany Hall was political machine that ran New York City through a system of political.
  • Telephone Invented

    Telephone Invented
  • Reconstruction Ends

    Reconstruction Ends
  • Jim Crow Laws Start

    Jim Crow Laws Start
    Jim Crow law. Jim Crow law, in U.S. history, any of the laws that enforced racial segregation in the South between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the beginning of the civil rights movement in the 1950s.
  • Light Bulb Invented

    Light Bulb Invented
  • Third Wave of Immigration

    Third Wave of Immigration
    U.S has experienced, the culture and context of life in the United States have changed considerably.
  • Chinese Exclusion Act

    Chinese Exclusion Act
    They didn't like the Chinese do to there work and intelligence.
  • Pendleton Act

    Pendleton Act
    Was past by congress in 1883 to improve upon the civil service system.
  • Dawes Act 1887

    Dawes Act 1887
  • Interstate Commerce Act

    Interstate Commerce Act
    Making the first railroads subject of regulation.
  • Andrew Carnegie’s Gospel of Wealth

    Andrew Carnegie’s Gospel of Wealth
    "The Gospel of Wealth", is an article written by Andrew Carnegie
  • Chicagos full house

    Chicagos full house
    Hull House was a settlement house in the United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr.
  • Klondike Gold Rush

    Klondike Gold Rush
  • Sherman Anti-Trust Act

    Sherman Anti-Trust Act
    The Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 was the first measure passed by the U.S. Congress to prohibit trusts.
  • How the other half lives

    How the other half lives
    Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) was an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis, documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s.
  • Influence of Sea Power Upon History

    Influence of Sea Power Upon History
    The Influence of Sea Power Upon History: 1660–1783 is a history of naval warfare published in 1890 by Alfred Thayer Mahan.
  • Homestead Steel Labor Strike

    Homestead Steel Labor Strike
    Workers went on strike for better work conditions and pay.
    Because the workers argued with Carnegie terms they were locked out.
  • Pullman Labor Strike

    Pullman Labor Strike
    Men were left abandoned on railroad tracks.
  • Plessy v. Ferguson

    Plessy v. Ferguson
    Plessy v. Ferguson, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court, on May 18, 1896, by a seven-to-one majority (one justice did not participate), advanced the controversial “separate but equal” doctrine for assessing the constitutionality of racial segregation laws.
  • Annexation of Hawaii

    Annexation of Hawaii
    The overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii began with an against Queen Liliuokalani.
  • Spanish American War

    Spanish American War
    The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba.
  • Open Door Policy

    Open Door Policy
    The Open Door Policy is a term in foreign affairs initially used to refer to the United States policy established in the late 19th century and the early 20th century, as enunciated in Secretary of State John Hay's Open Door Note, dated September 6, 1899 and dispatched to the major European powers.
  • Open Door policy

    Open Door policy
    The Open Door Policy was an American proposal that aimed to keep Chinese markets open for all and not allow any one country to gain control over the region.
  • Nationalism

    The pride of ones country
  • Nationalism

    The pride of ones country
  • Nationalism

    The pride of a man country
  • Assassination of President McKindley

    Assassination of President McKindley
    On September 6, 1901, William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States, was shot on the grounds of the Pan-American Exposition at the Temple of Music in Buffalo, New York.
  • Wright Brother’s Airplane

    Wright Brother’s Airplane
    Buoyant over the success of their 1902 glider, the Wright brothers were no longer content to merely add to the growing body of aeronautical knowledge; they were going to invent the airplane. Still, they recognized that much hard work lay ahead, especially the creation of a propulsion system.
  • Panama Canal U.S. Construction Begins

    Panama Canal U.S. Construction Begins
    Theodore Roosevelt oversaw the realization of a long-term United States goal—a trans-isthmian canal.
  • The Jungle

    The Jungle
    Sinclair wrote the novel to portray the harsh conditions and exploited lives of immigrants in the United States in Chicago and similar industrialized cities.
  • Pure Food and Drug Act

    Pure Food and Drug Act
    For preventing the sale of poisonous or deleterious foods, drugs, medicines, and liquors.
  • Model-T

    Henry Ford’s revolutionary advancements in assembly-line automobile manufacturing made the Model T the first car to be affordable for a majority of Americans.

    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is a civil rights organization in the United States, formed in 1909 as a bi-racial organization to advance justice for African Americans by W. E. B. Du Bois
  • Taft

    President Taft was more committed to the expansion of U.S. foreign trade than was Roosevelt.
  • Theodore Roosevelt

    Theodore Roosevelt
    Roosevelt won a Nobel Peace Prize for his negotiations to end the Russo-Japanese War and spearheaded the beginning of construction on the Panama Canal.
  • 16th Amendment

    16th Amendment
    The Congress shall have the power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.
  • Federal Reserve Act

    Federal Reserve Act
    The Federal Reserve Act intended to establish a form of economic stability in the United States through the introduction of the Central Bank, which would be in charge of monetary policy.
  • Wilson Woodrow

    Wilson Woodrow
    That irony was soon realized. In 1913, Wilson repudiated his predecessors' Dollar Diplomacy.
  • 17th Amendment

    17th Amendment
    The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote.
  • Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdiland

    Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdiland
    The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, occurred on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo when they were mortally wounded by Gavrilo Princip
  • Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns

    Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns
    Chemical warfare first appeared when the Germans used poison gas during a surprise attack in Flanders, Belgium, in 1915. At first, gas was just released from large cylinders and carried by the wind into nearby enemy lines. Later, phosgene and other gases were loaded into artillery shells and shot into enemy trenches.
  • National Parks System

    National Parks System
    On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act creating the National Park Service, a new federal bureau in the Department of the Interior responsible for protecting the 35 national parks and monuments then managed by the department and those yet to be established.
  • 18th Amendment

    18th Amendment
    Band of Alchol
  • 19th Amendment

    19th Amendment
    Womens suffrage
  • President Harding's Return to Normalcy

    President Harding's Return to Normalcy
    Return to normalcy, a return to the way of life before World War I, was United States presidential candidate Warren G. Harding's campaign promise in the election of 1920.
  • Harlem Renaissance

    Harlem Renaissance
    The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s. During the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement", named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke.
  • Red Scare

    Red Scare
    A "Red Scare" is promotion, real and imagined, of widespread fear and government paranoia by a society or state, about a potential rise of communism, anarchism, or radical leftism.
  • Teapot Dome Scandal

    Teapot Dome Scandal
    The Teapot Dome Scandal was a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1921 to 1922, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding.
  • Joseph Stalin Leads USSR

    Joseph Stalin Leads USSR
    Under Stalin, the Soviet Union was transformed from a peasant society into an industrial and military superpower. However, he ruled by terror, and millions of his own citizens died during his brutal reign. Born into poverty, Stalin became involved in revolutionary politics, as well as criminal activities, as a young man.
  • Scopes "Monkey"Trial

    Scopes "Monkey"Trial
    The Scopes Trial, commonly referred to as the Scopes Evolution Trial or the Scopes Monkey trial, began on July 10th, 1925.
  • Mein Kampf published

    Mein Kampf published
    Mein Kampf, which means my struggle, was a two volume book written by Adolf Hitler
  • Charles Lindbergh's Trans-Atlantic Flight

    Charles Lindbergh's Trans-Atlantic Flight
    Yet, when Charles Lindbergh landed safely in Paris less than 34 hours later, becoming the first pilot to solo a nonstop transatlantic flight, he changed public opinion on the value of air travel and laid the foundation for the future development of aviation
  • St. Valentines Day Massacre

    St. Valentines Day Massacre
    The Saint Valentine's Day Massacre is the name given to the 1929 murder in Chicago of seven men of the North Side gang during the Prohibition Era
  • Stock Market Crashes"Black Tuesday"

    Stock Market Crashes"Black Tuesday"
    Black Tuesday was the fourth and last day of the stock market crash of 1929. It took place on October 29, 1929.
  • Hoovervilles

    A "Hooverville" was a shanty town built during the Great Depression by the homeless in the United States of America. They were named after Herbert Hoover, who was President of the United States of America during the onset of the Depression and was widely blamed for it.
  • Smoot-Hawley Tariff

    Smoot-Hawley Tariff
    Hawley–Smoot Tariff, was an act implementing protectionist trade policies sponsored by Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis C. Hawley and signed into law on June 17, 1930. The act raised U.S. tariffs on over 20,000 imported goods.
  • 100, 000 Banks Have Failed

    100, 000 Banks Have Failed
    By 1933, depositors saw $140 billion disappear through bank failures.
  • Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)

    Agriculture Adjustment Administration (AAA)
    Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA), in American history, major New Deal program to restore agricultural prosperity by curtailing farm production, reducing export surpluses, and raising prices.
  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)
    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) was established under the Banking Act of 1933 in response to numerous bank failures during the Great Depression.
  • Public Works Administration

    Public Works Administration
    It was created by the National Industrial Recovery Act in June 1933 in response to the Great Depression. It built large-scale public works such as dams, bridges, hospitals, and schools. Its goals were to spend $3.3 billion in the first year, and $6 billion in all, to provide employment, stabilize purchasing power, and help revive the economy.
  • Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany

    Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany
    On this day in History, Adolf Hitler is named chancellor of Germany on Jan 30, 1933.
  • Dust Bowl

    Dust Bowl
    The Dust Bowl, also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the American and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought
  • Social Security Administration (1935)

    Social Security Administration (1935)
    The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government that administers Social Security, a social insurance program consisting of retirement, disability, and survivors' benefits.
  • Rape of Nanjing

    The Nanking Massacre was an episode of mass murder and mass rape committed by Japanese troops against the residents of Nanjing
  • Kristallnacht

    Kristallnacht: German “Crystal Night” the night of November 9–10, 1938, when German Nazis attacked Jewish persons and property.
  • Hitler invades Poland

    Hitler invades Poland
    Both had been accomplished without igniting hostilities with the major powers, and Hitler hoped that his invasion of Poland would likewise be tolerated.
  • German Blitzkrieg attacks

    German Blitzkrieg attacks
    the Germans unleashed their Blitzkrieg against the Netherlands and Belgium. The attack sent the defending troops reeling.
  • Pearl Harbor

    Pearl Harbor
    In honor of 2,403 victims who were killed in the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.
  • Tuskegee Airmen (1941)

    Tuskegee Airmen (1941)
    The Tuskegee Army Air Field became the vital center for training African Americans to fly fighter and bomber aircraft. In 1941, the U. S. Army Air Corps (predecessor to the modern-day U.S. Air Force) was a segregated part of the military.
  • Navajo Code Talkers (1941)

    Navajo Code Talkers (1941)
    The Marine Corps recruited Navajo Code Talkers in 1941 and 1942. Philip Johnston was a World War I veteran who had heard about the successes of the Choctaw telephone squad.
  • Executive Order 9066 (1942)

    Executive Order 9066 (1942)
    Executive Order 9066 was a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942.
  • Bataan Death March (1942)

    Bataan Death March (1942)
    The Bataan Death March was the forcible transfer by the Imperial Japanese Army of 60,000–80,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war from Saysain Point, Bagac, Bataan and Mariveles to Camp O'Donnell, Capas, Tarlac, via San Fernando, Pampanga, where the prisoners were loaded onto trains.
  • Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) (1944)

    Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) (1944)
    The following major units were landed on D-Day (6 June 1944). A more detailed order of battle for D-Day itself can be found at Normandy landings and List of Allied forces in the Normandy Campaign. British 6th Airborne Division.
  • GI Bill

    GI Bill
    On June 22, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act, better known as the G.I. Bill, in order to help soldiers secure stability as they returned to civilian life. A broadcast aired shortly after the bill was signed describes a nation preparing to welcome World War II veterans.
  • Atomic bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima (1945)

    Atomic bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima (1945)
    During the final stage of World War II, the United States dropped nuclear weapons on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively.
  • Victory over Japan/Pacific (VJ/VP) Day (1945)

    Victory over Japan/Pacific (VJ/VP) Day (1945)
    VP (Victory in the Pacific) Day, also referred to as VJ (Victory over Japan) Day, is celebrated on 15 August. This date commemorates Japan's acceptance of the Allied demand for unconditional surrender 14 August 1945.
  • Liberation of Concentration Camps (1945)

    Liberation of Concentration Camps (1945)
    General Dwight D. Eisenhower and General Troy Middleton, commanding general of the XVIII Corps, Third US Army, tour the newly liberated Ohrdruf concentration camp.
  • Victory in Europe (VE) Day (1945)

    Victory in Europe (VE) Day (1945)
    Victory in Europe Day, generally known as V-E Day, VE Day or simply V Day, was the public holiday celebrated on 8 May 1945 to mark the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces.
  • United Nations (UN)Formed

    United Nations (UN)Formed
    The UN Charter was drafted at a conference between April–June 1945 in San Francisco, and was signed on 26 June 1945 at the conclusion of the conference; this charter took effect 24 October 1945, and the UN began operation. The UN's mission to preserve world peace was complicated in its early decades by the Cold War between the US and Soviet Union and their respective allies.
  • Germany Divided

    Germany Divided
    As a consequence of the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II, Germany was cut between the two global blocs in the East and West, a period known as the division of Germany. Germany was stripped of its war gains and lost territories in the east to Poland and the Soviet Union.
  • United Nations (UN) Formed

    United Nations (UN) Formed
    Roosevelt also sought to convince the public that an international organization was the best means to prevent future wars. The Senate approved the UN Charter on July 28, 1945, by a vote of 89 to 2. The United Nations came into existence on October 24, 1945, after 29 nations had ratified the Charter.
  • Germany Divided

    Germany Divided
    As a consequence of the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II, Germany was cut between the two global blocs in the East and West, a period known as the division of Germany.
  • Nuremberg Trials (1946)

    Nuremberg Trials (1946)
    The Major War Criminals' Trial: 1945-46. The best-known of the Nuremberg trials was the Trial of Major War Criminals, held from November 20, 1945, to October 1, 1946. The format of the trial was a mix of legal tradition.
  • Mao Zedong Established Communist Rule in China

    Mao Zedong Established Communist Rule in China
    Mao adopted Marxism–Leninism while working at Peking University and became a founding member of the Communist Party of China (CPC), leading the Autumn Harvest Uprising in 1927. ... On 1 October 1949, Mao Zedong proclaimed the foundation of the People's Republic of China (PRC), a single-party state controlled by the CPC.
  • 22nd Amendment

    22nd Amendment
    Donald Trump. Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017. Before entering politics, he was a businessman and television personality.
  • Marshall Plan

    Marshall Plan
    The Marshall Plan (officially the European Recovery Program, ERP) was an American initiative to aid Western Europe, in which the United States gave over $13 billion (nearly $140 billion in 2017 dollars) in economic assistance to help rebuild Western European economies after the end of World War II.
  • Berlin Airlift

    Berlin Airlift
    The Berlin Blockade was one of the first major international crises of the Cold War.
  • NATO formed

    NATO formed
    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance between several North American and European countries based on the North Atlantic Treaty that was signed on 4 April 1949.
  • Kim Il-sung invades South Korea

    Kim Il-sung invades South Korea
    In December 1945, the Soviets installed Kim as chairman of the North Korean branch of the Korean Communist Party. ... Prior to Kim's invasion of the South in 1950, which triggered the Korean War, Joseph Stalin equipped the KPA with modern, Soviet-built medium tanks, trucks, artillery, and small arms.
  • UN forces push North Korea to Yalu River- the border with China

    UN forces push North Korea to Yalu River- the border with China
    Chinese Army entered the Korean War in earnest with a violent attack against the American and United Nations forces in North Korea.
  • Chinese forces cross Yalu and enter Korean War

    Chinese forces cross Yalu and enter Korean War
    Chinese troops attacked American and U.N. forces in North Korea. China's intervention in the war came as a surprise to many, and vastly expanded the scope of the conflict.
  • Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution

    Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution
    Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, a married couple convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage in 1951, are put to death in the electric chair.
  • Armistice Signed

    Armistice Signed
    Also known as the Armistice of Compiègne from the place where it was signed, it came into force at 11 a.m. Paris time on 11 November 1918 ("the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month") and marked a victory for the Allies and a complete defeat for Germany, although not formally a surrender.
  • Hernandez v. Texas

    Hernandez v. Texas
    Hernandez v. Texas, 347 U.S. 475 was a landmark case, "the first and only Mexican-American civil-rights case heard and decided by the United States Supreme Court during the post-World War II period.
  • Brown v. Board of Education

    Brown v. Board of Education
    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483, was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional.
  • Ho Chi Minh Established Communist Rule in Vietnam

    Ho Chi Minh Established Communist Rule in Vietnam
    The Việt Minh Front was supposed to be an umbrella group for all parties fighting for Vietnam's independence, but was dominated by the Communist Party. ... From China, other non-Communist Vietnamese parties also joined the Việt Minh and established armed forces with backing from the Kuomintang.
  • Warsaw Pact Formed

    Warsaw Pact Formed
    The Warsaw Pact, formally the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance, was a collective defence treaty signed in Warsaw, Poland among the Soviet Union and seven Soviet satellite states ...
  • Polio Vaccine

    Polio Vaccine
    There are two types of vaccine that protect against polio: inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). IPV is given as an injection in the leg or arm, depending on the patient's age. Polio vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.
  • Rosa Parks Arrested

    Rosa Parks Arrested
    On 1 December 1955, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. This single act of nonviolent resistance sparked the Montgomery bus boycott, an eleven-month struggle to desegregate the city's buses.
  • Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Montgomery Bus Boycott
    The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a political and social protest campaign against the policy of racial segregation on the public transit system of Montgomery, Alabama. It was a seminal event in the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Interstate Highway Act

    Interstate Highway Act
    The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. It took several years of wrangling, but a new Federal-Aid Highway Act passed in June 1956. The law authorized the construction of a 41,000-mile network of interstate highways that would span the nation. It also allocated $26 billion to pay for them.
  • Elvis Presley First Hit Song

    Elvis Presley First Hit Song
    February 1956. As "Heartbreak Hotel" makes its climb up the charts on its way to #1, "I Forgot to Remember to Forget" b/w "Mystery Train," Elvis' fifth and last single to be released on the Sun label, hits #1 on Billboard's national country singles chart. His first #1 hit on a national chart.
  • Truman Doctrine

    Truman Doctrine
    The Truman Doctrine was an American foreign policy whose stated purpose was to counter Soviet geopolitical expansion during the Cold War. It was first announced to Congress by President Harry S. Truman on March 12, 1947 and further developed on July 12, 1948 when he pledged to contain threats to Greece and Turkey.
  • Sputnik

    Sputnik 1 was the first artificial Earth satellite. The Soviet Union launched it into an elliptical low Earth orbit on 4 October 1957. It was a 58 cm diameter polished metal sphere, with four external radio antennas to broadcast radio pulses.
  • Leave it to Beaver First Airs on TV

    Leave it to Beaver First Airs on TV
    It's been 56 years since a cute little munchkin named Theodore entered our lives as “The Beaver” in an all-American show about suburban family life. The first episode of “Leave It To Beaver” aired on October 4, 1957; the last episode was June 20, 1963.
  • Civil Rights Act of 1957

    Civil Rights Act of 1957
    The result was the Civil Rights Act of 1957, the first civil rights legislation since Reconstruction. The new act established the Civil Rights Section of the Justice Department and empowered federal prosecutors to obtain court injunctions against interference with the right to vote.
  • Little Rock Nine

    Little Rock Nine
    The Little Rock Nine was a group of nine African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957.
  • Kennedy versus Nixon TV Debate

    Kennedy versus Nixon TV Debate
    The United States presidential election of 1960 was the 44th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 1960. In a closely contested election, Democrat John F. Kennedy defeated incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon, the Republican Party nominee.
  • Chicano Mural Movement Begins

    Chicano Mural Movement Begins
    The Chicano Mural Movement began as an artistic renaissance in the U.S. Southwest during the 1960s. Unlike in Mexico, its first murals were not commissioned, promoted or sponsored by the government, companies or individuals; the Chicano artists instead painted on neighborhood buildings, schools, and churches.
  • Bay of Pigs Invasion

    Bay of Pigs Invasion
    On April 17, 1961, 1400 Cuban exiles launched what became a botched invasion at the Bay of Pigs on the south coast of Cuba. In 1959, Fidel Castro came to power in an armed revolt that overthrew Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista.
  • Peace Corps Formed

    Peace Corps Formed
    The Peace Corps is a volunteer program run by the United States government. The stated mission of the Peace Corps includes providing technical assistance, helping people outside the United States
  • Mapp v. Ohio

    Mapp v. Ohio
    Mapp v. Ohio, 367 U.S. 643, was a landmark case in criminal procedure, in which the United States Supreme Court decided that evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment, which protects against
  • Affirmative Action

    Affirmative Action
    Executive Order 10925, signed by President John F. Kennedy on March 6, 1961, required government contractors to "take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed and that employees are treated during employment without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin."
  • Cuban Missile Crisis

    Cuban Missile Crisis
    The Cuban Missile Crisis, also known as the October Crisis, the Caribbean Crisis, or the Missile Scare, was a 13-day confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union concerning American
  • Sam Walton Opens First Walmart

    Sam Walton Opens First Walmart
    On July 2, 1962, Sam Walton opens the first Walmart store in Rogers, Arkansas. The Walton family owns 24 stores, ringing up $12.7 million in sales. The company officially incorporates as Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
  • Kennedy Assassinated in Dallas, Texas

    Kennedy Assassinated in Dallas, Texas
    John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. in Dallas, Texas while riding in a presidential motorcade in Dealey Plaza.
  • Gideon v. Wainwright

    Gideon v. Wainwright
    Gideon v. Wainwright, 372 U.S. 335, is a landmark case in United States Supreme Court history. In it, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that states are required under the Sixth Amendment to the U.S.
  • George Wallace Blocks University of Alabama Entrance

    George Wallace Blocks University of Alabama Entrance
    George Wallace, the Democratic Governor of Alabama, in a symbolic attempt to keep his inaugural promise of "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" and stop the desegregation of schools, stood at the door of the auditorium to try to block the entry of two African American students
  • The Feminine Mystique

    The Feminine Mystique
    The Feminine Mystique is a book written by Betty Friedan which is widely credited with sparking the beginning of second-wave feminism in the United States. It was published on February 19, 1963 by W. W. Norton.
  • March on Washington

    March on Washington
    The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the March on Washington, or The Great March on Washington, was held in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963.
  • The Great Society

    The Great Society
    The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65. The main goal was the elimination of poverty and racial injustice.
  • Escobedo v. Illinois

    Escobedo v. Illinois
    Escobedo v. Illinois, 378 U.S. 478, was a United States Supreme Court case holding that criminal suspects have a right to counsel during police interrogations under the Sixth Amendment.
  • Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

    Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
    The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution or the Southeast Asia Resolution, Pub.L. 88–408, 78 Stat. 384, enacted August 10, 1964, was a joint resolution that the United States Congress passed on August 7, 1964, in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident.
  • Civil Rights Act of 1964

    Civil Rights Act of 1964
    The Civil Rights Act of 1964, which ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, is considered one of the crowning legislative achievements of the civil rights movement.
  • 24th Amendment

    24th Amendment
    The Twenty-fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution prohibits both Congress and the states from conditioning the right to vote in federal elections on payment of a poll tax or other types of tax.
  • Israeli-Palestine Conflict Begins

    Israeli-Palestine Conflict Begins
    The 1948 Arab–Israeli War, or the First Arab–Israeli War, was fought between the State of Israel and a military coalition of Arab states over the control of Palestine, forming the second stage of the 1948 Palestine war.
  • Voting Rights Act of 1965

    Voting Rights Act of 1965
    The Voting Rights Act of 1965, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote as guaranteed under the 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
  • Malcom X Assassinated

    Malcom X Assassinated
    Malcolm X was an African-American Muslim minister and human rights activist. To his admirers he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms
  • United Farm Worker’s California Delano Grape Strike

    United Farm Worker’s California Delano Grape Strike
    National Farm Workers Association, to join their strike. Cesar and the leaders of .... The boycott connected middle-class families in big cities with poor farm worker families in the California vineyards.
  • Miranda v. Arizona

    Miranda v. Arizona
    Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436, was a landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court. In a 5–4 majority, the Court held that both inculpatory and exculpatory statements made in response
  • Thurgood Marshall Appointed to Supreme Court

    Thurgood Marshall Appointed to Supreme Court
    In 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed Marshall to United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Four years later, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Marshall as the United States Solicitor General. In 1967, Johnson successfully nominated Marshall to succeed retiring Associate Justice Tom C. Clark.
  • Six Day War

    Six Day War
    The Six-Day War, also known as the June War, 1967 Arab–Israeli War, or Third Arab–Israeli War, was fought between June 5 and 10, 1967 by Israel and the neighboring states of Egypt, Jordan, and Syria
  • Tet Offensive

    Tet Offensive
    The Tet Offensive, or officially called The General Offensive and Uprising of Tet Mau Than 1968 by North Vietnam and the NLF, was one of the largest military campaigns of the Vietnam War
  • My Lai Massacre

    My Lai Massacre
    The Mỹ Lai Massacre was the Vietnam War mass murder of unarmed Vietnamese civilians by U.S. troops in South Vietnam on 16 March 1968.
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Assassinated

    Martin Luther King Jr. Assassinated
    James Earl Ray was born in Alton, Illinois, on March 10, 1928. A confirmed racist and small-time criminal, Ray began plotting the assassination of revered civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. in early 1968. He shot and killed King in Memphis on April 4, 1968, confessing to the crime the following March.
  • Tinker v. Des Moines

    Tinker v. Des Moines
    Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, 393 U.S. 503, was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court that defined the constitutional rights of students in U.S. public schools.
  • Vietnamization

    the US policy of withdrawing its troops and transferring the responsibility and direction of the war effort to the government of South Vietnam.
  • Woodstock Music Festival

    Woodstock Music Festival
    The Woodstock Music & Art Fair—informally, the Woodstock Festival or simply Woodstock— was a music festival in the United States in 1969 which attracted an audience of more than 400,000.
  • Draft Lottery

    Draft Lottery
    366 blue plastic capsules contained the birthdays that would be chosen in the first Vietnam draft lottery drawing on December 1, 1969. The first birth date drawn that night, assigned the lowest number, “001,” was September 14.
  • Manson Family Murders

    Manson Family Murders
    The Manson Family was a commune established in California in the late 1960s, led by Charles Manson. They gained national notoriety after the murder of actress Sharon Tate and four others on August 9, 1969 by Tex Watson and three other members of the Family, acting under the instructions of Charles Manson.
  • Apollo 11

    Apollo 11
    Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two humans on the Moon. Mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilot Buzz Aldrin, both American, landed the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:18 UTC.
  • Invasion of Cambodia

    Invasion of Cambodia
    The Cambodian Campaign was a series of military operations conducted in eastern Cambodia during 1970 by the United States and the Republic of Vietnam as an extension of the Vietnam War and the Cambodian Civil War.
  • Kent State Shootings

    Kent State Shootings
    The Kent State shootings were the shootings on May 4, 1970 of unarmed college students by members of the Ohio National Guard at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio during a mass protest against
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
    Environmental Protection Agency. ... In 1970, in response to the welter of confusing, often ineffective environmental protection laws enacted by states and communities, President Richard Nixon created the EPA to fix national guidelines and to monitor and enforce them.
  • Pentagon Papers

    Pentagon Papers
    Katharine Graham is the first female publisher of a major American newspaper -- The Washington Post. With help from editor Ben Bradlee, Graham races to catch up with The New York Times to expose a massive cover-up of government secrets that spans three decades and four U.S. presidents.
  • 26th Amendment

    26th Amendment
    The Twenty-sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from using age as a reason for denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States who are at least eighteen years old
  • Policy of Détente Begins

    Policy of Détente Begins
    Détente (a French word meaning release from tension) is the name given to a period of improved relations between the United States and the Soviet Union that began tentatively in 1971 and took decisive form when President Richard M. Nixon visited the secretary-general of the Soviet Communist party, Leonid I.
  • Title IX

    Title IX
    On June 23, 1972, the President signed Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. §1681 et seq., into law. Title IX is a comprehensive federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity.
  • Nixon Visits China

    Nixon Visits China
    In an amazing turn of events, President Richard Nixon takes a dramatic first step toward normalizing relations with the communist People's Republic of China (PRC) by traveling to Beijing for a week of talks. Nixon's historic visit began the slow process of the re-establishing diplomatic relations
  • Watergate Scandal

    Watergate Scandal
    The Watergate scandal was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States during the early 1970s, following a break-in by five men at the Democratic National Committee headquarters
  • War Powers Resolution

    War Powers Resolution
    The War Powers Resolution (also known as the War Powers Resolution of 1973 or the War Powers Act) (50 U.S.C. 1541–1548) is a federal law intended to check the president's power to commit the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of the U.S. Congress
  • Roe v. Wade

    Roe v. Wade
    Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), is a landmark decision issued in 1973 by the United States Supreme Court on the issue of the constitutionality of laws that criminalized or restricted access to abortions.
  • Engaged Species Act

    Engaged Species Act
    The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was signed on December 28, 1973, and provides for the conservation of species that are endangered or threatened throughout all or a significant portion of their range, and the conservation of the ecosystems on which they depend
  • OPEC Oil Embargo

    OPEC Oil Embargo
    Oil Embargo, 1973–1974. During the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, Arab members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) imposed an embargo against the United States in retaliation for the U.S. decision to re-supply the Israeli military and to gain leverage in the post-war peace negotiations.
  • First Cell-Phones

    First Cell-Phones
    Motorola was the first company to produce a handheld mobile phone. On April 3, 1973, Martin Cooper, a Motorola researcher and executive, made the first mobile telephone call from handheld subscriber equipment, placing a call to Dr. Joel S. Engel of Bell Labs, his rival.
  • United States v. Nixon

    United States v. Nixon
    United States v. Nixon, 418 U.S. 683 (1974), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case which resulted in a unanimous decision against President Richard Nixon, ordering him to deliver tape recordings and other subpoenaed materials to a federal district court.
  • Ford Pardons Nixon

    Ford Pardons Nixon
    On this day in 1974, President Gerald Ford, who assumed office on the heels of President Richard M. Nixon’s resignation, pardons his predecessor for his involvement in the Watergate scandal. Congress had accused Nixon of obstruction of justice during the investigation
  • Fall of Saigon

    Fall of Saigon
    The Fall of Saigon was the capture of Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, by the People's Army of Vietnam and the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam on 30 April 1975.
  • Bill Gates Starts Microsoft

    Bill Gates Starts Microsoft
    Microsoft was founded on April 4, 1975, by Bill Gates and Paul Allen in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
  • National Rifle Associate (NRA) Lobbying Begins

    National Rifle Associate (NRA) Lobbying Begins
    The Institute for Legislative Action (NRA-ILA), the lobbying branch of the NRA, was established in 1975. According to political scientists John M. Bruce and Clyde Wilcox, the NRA shifted its focus in the late 1970s to incorporate political advocacy, and started seeing its members
  • Steve Jobs Starts Apple

    Steve Jobs Starts Apple
    In 1975, the 20-year-old Jobs and Wozniak set up shop in Jobs' parents' garage, dubbed the venture Apple, and began working on the prototype of the Apple I. To generate the $1,350 in capital they used to start Apple, Steve Jobs sold his Volkswagen microbus, and Steve Wozniak sold his Hewlett-Packard calculator.
  • Community Reinvestment Act of 1977

    Community Reinvestment Act of 1977
    The Community Reinvestment Act is intended to encourage depository institutions to help meet the credit needs of the communities in which they operate, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, consistent with safe and sound operations. ... Comments will be taken into consideration during the next CRA examination.
  • Camp David Accords

    Camp David Accords
    The Camp David Accords were signed by Egyptian President Anwar El Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin on 17 September 1978, following twelve days of secret negotiations at Camp David.
  • Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty

    Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty
    The Egypt–Israel Peace Treaty was signed in Washington, D.C., United States on 26 March 1979, following the 1978 Camp David Accords. The Egypt–Israel treaty was signed by Egyptian president Anwar Sadat and Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin, and witnessed by United States president Jimmy Carter.
  • Conservative Resurgence

    Conservative Resurgence
    Its initiators called it the Conservative Resurgence while its detractors labeled it the Fundamentalist Takeover. It was launched with the charge that the seminaries and denominational agencies were dominated by liberals.
  • “Trickle Down Economics”

    “Trickle Down Economics”
    Trickle-down economics, also referred to as trickle-down theory, is an economic theory that advocates reducing taxes on businesses and the wealthy in society as a means to stimulate business investment in the short term and benefit society at large in the long term.
  • War on Drugs

    War on Drugs
    The video traces the drug war from President Nixon to the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws to the emerging aboveground marijuana market that is poised to make legal ... Soon after Ronald Reagan took office in 1981, his wife, Nancy Reagan, began a highly-publicized anti-drug campaign
  • AIDS Epidemic

    AIDS Epidemic
    HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic. As of 2016, approximately 36.7 million people are living with HIV globally. In 2016, approximately half are men and half are women. There were about 1.0 million deaths from AIDS in 2016, down from 1.9 million in 2005
  • Sandra Day O’Connor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court

    Sandra Day O’Connor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court
    Sandra Day O'Connor (born March 26, 1930) is a retired Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving from her appointment in 1981 by Ronald Reagan to 2006. She was the first woman to serve on the Court.
  • Marines in Lebanon

    Marines in Lebanon
    Facts: October 23, 1983 - 241 US service personnel -- including 220 Marines and 21 other service personnel -- are killed by a truck bomb at a Marine compound in Beirut, Lebanon. Three hundred service members had been living at the four-story building at the airport in Beirut.
  • Iran-Contra Affair

    Iran-Contra Affair
    The Iran–Contra affair, also referred to as Irangate, Contragate or the Iran–Contra scandal, was a political scandal in the United States that occurred during the second term of the Reagan Administration.
  • The Oprah Winfrey Show First Airs

    The Oprah Winfrey Show First Airs
    The Oprah Winfrey Show, often referred to simply as Oprah, is an American syndicated talk show that aired nationally for 25 seasons from September 8, 1986 to May 25, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois.
  • “Mr. Gorbachev, Tear Down This Wall!”

    “Mr. Gorbachev, Tear Down This Wall!”
    "Tear down this wall!" is a line from a speech made by US President Ronald Reagan in West Berlin on June 12, 1987, calling for the leader of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, to open up the barrier
  • End of Cold War

    End of Cold War
    During 1989 and 1990, the Berlin Wall came down, borders opened, and free elections ousted Communist regimes everywhere in eastern Europe. In late 1991 the Soviet Union itself dissolved into its component republics. With stunning speed, the Iron Curtain was lifted and the Cold War came to an end.
  • Berlin Wall Falls

    Berlin Wall Falls
    The Berlin Wall: The Fall of the Wall. On November 9, 1989, as the Cold War began to thaw across Eastern Europe, the spokesman for East Berlin's Communist Party announced a change in his city's relations with the West. Starting at midnight that day, he said, citizens of the GDR were free to cross the country's borders.
  • Germany Reunification

    Germany Reunification
    Accordingly, on Unification Day, 3 October 1990, the German Democratic Republic ceased to exist, and five new Federal States on its former territory joined the Federal Republic of Germany. East and West Berlin were reunited and joined the Federal Republic as a full-fledged Federal City-State.
  • Iraq Invades Kuwait

    Iraq Invades Kuwait
    The Invasion of Kuwait on 2 August 1990 was a 2-day operation conducted by Iraq against the neighboring state of Kuwait, which resulted in the seven-month-long Iraqi occupation of the country.
  • Soviet Union Collapses

    Soviet Union Collapses
    On December 25, 1991, the Soviet hammer and sickle flag lowered for the last time over the Kremlin, thereafter replaced by the Russian tricolor. Earlier in the day, Mikhail Gorbachev resigned his post as president of the Soviet Union, leaving Boris Yeltsin as president of the newly independent Russian state.
  • Operation Desert Storm

    Operation Desert Storm
    The Gulf War, codenamed Operation Desert Shield for operations leading to the buildup of troops and defense of Saudi Arabia and Operation Desert Storm in its combat phase, was a war waged by a coalition.
  • Rodney King

    Rodney King
    Rodney Glen King was an African-American taxi driver who became known internationally as the victim of Los Angeles Police Department brutality, after a videotape was released of several police officers beating him during his arrest on March 3, 1991.
  • Ms. Adcox Born

  • NAFTA Founded

    NAFTA Founded
    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico, and the United States and entered into force on 1 January 1994 in order to establish a trilateral trade bloc in North America.
  • Contract with America

    Contract with America
    Contract with America. Contract with America, a document signed Sept. 27, 1994, on the Capitol steps in Washington, D.C., by members of the Republican minority before the Republican Party gained control of Congress in 1994.
  • O.J. Simpson’s “Trial of the Century”

    O.J. Simpson’s “Trial of the Century”
    The O. J. Simpson murder case was a criminal trial held at the Los Angeles County Superior Court in which former National Football League (NFL) player, broadcaster, and actor Orenthal James "O. J." Simpson was tried on two counts of murder for the June 12, 1994, deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson.
  • Bill Clinton’s Impeachment

    Bill Clinton’s Impeachment
    The impeachment process of Bill Clinton was initiated by the House of Representatives on December 19, 1998, against Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, on two charges, one of perjury and one of obstruction of justice.
  • USA Patriot Act

    USA Patriot Act
    The USA PATRIOT Act is an Act of Congress that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001. With its ten-letter abbreviation (USA PATRIOT) expanded, the full title is “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001”.
  • War on Terror

    War on Terror
    The War on Terror, also known as the Global War on Terrorism, is an international military campaign that was launched by the U.S. government after the September 11 attacks in the U.S. in 2001.
  • Josue Lindsey (Rico Suave)

  • 9/11

    The September 11 attacks were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001.
  • NASA Mars Rover Mission Begins

    NASA Mars Rover Mission Begins
    NASA's twin robot geologists, the Mars Exploration Rovers, launched toward Mars on June 10 and July 7, 2003, in search of answers about the history of water on Mars. They landed on Mars January 3 and January 24 PST, 2004 (January 4 and January 25 UTC, 2004).
  • Facebook Launched

    Facebook Launched
    February 2004, Cambridge, MA
  • Hurricane Katrina

    Hurricane Katrina
    Hurricane Katrina was an extremely destructive and deadly tropical cyclone that is tied with Hurricane Harvey of 2017 as the costliest tropical cyclone on record.
  • Saddam Hussein Executed

    Saddam Hussein Executed
    The execution of Saddam Hussein took place on Saturday, 30 December 2006. Saddam was sentenced to death by hanging, after being convicted of crimes against humanity by the Iraqi Special Tribunal for the murder of 148 Iraqi Shi'ites in the town of Dujail in 1982, in retaliation for an assassination attempt against him.
  • Iphone Released

    Iphone Released
    On January 2, 2007, Steve Jobs announced iPhone at the Macworld convention, receiving substantial media attention. Jobs announced that the first iPhone would be released later that year. On June 29, 2007, the first iPhone was released.
  • American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009
    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Pub.L. 111–5), nicknamed the Recovery Act, was a stimulus package enacted by the 111th U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama in February 2009.
  • Hilary Clinton Appointed U.S. Secretary of State

    Hilary Clinton Appointed U.S. Secretary of State
    Hillary Clinton served as the 67th United States Secretary of State, under President Barack Obama, from 2009 to 2013, overseeing the department that conducted the Foreign policy of Barack Obama. She was preceded in office by Condoleezza Rice, and succeeded by John Kerry
  • Sonia Sotomayor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court

    Sonia Sotomayor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court
    In May 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Sotomayor to the Supreme Court following the retirement of Justice David Souter. Her nomination was confirmed by the Senate in August 2009 by a vote of 68–31.
  • Arab Spring

    Arab Spring
    The Arab Spring, also referred to as Arab revolutions, was a revolutionary wave of both violent and non-violent demonstrations, protests, riots, coups, foreign interventions, and civil wars in North .
  • Osama Bin Laden Killed

    Osama Bin Laden Killed
    Osama bin Laden, the founder and first leader of the Islamist group Al-Qaeda, was killed in Pakistan on May 2, 2011 shortly after 1:00 am PKT by United States Navy SEALs of the U.S. Naval Special Warfare Development Group.
  • Space X Falcon 9

    Space X Falcon 9
    Falcon 9 is a family of two-stage-to-orbit medium lift launch vehicles, named for its use of nine Merlin first-stage engines, designed and manufactured by SpaceX. Variants include the initial v1.0, v1.1, and current "Full Thrust" v1.2.
  • Donald Trump Elected President

    Donald Trump Elected President
    Donald Trump. Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017. Before entering politics, he was a businessman and television personality.
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    American Civil War

    The American Civil War was a civil war that was fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. As a result of the long-standing controversy over slavery, war broke out in April 1861
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    The Reconstruction era was the period from 1863 or 1865 to 1877. In the context of the history of the United States, the term has two applications: the first applies to the complete history
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    Gilded Age

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    Progressive Era

    A period of widespread social activism and political reform across the United States.
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    a policy of extending a country's power and influence through diplomacy or military force.
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    Theodore Roosevelt

    The Square Deal
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    William Howard Taft

    Dollar Diplomacy
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    Woodrow Wilson

    Moral Diplomacy
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    World War I

    World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe
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    Roaring Twenties

    The Roaring Twenties was the period of Western society and Western culture that occurred during and around the 1920s
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    Great Depression

    The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, originating in the United States.
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    Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt, commonly known as FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.
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    New Deal Programs

    The New Deal was a sweeping package of public works projects, federal regulations, and financial system reforms enacted by the U.S. federal government in an effort to help the nation survive and recover from the Great Depression of the 1930s.
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    The Holocaust

    The Holocaust, also referred to as the Shoah, was a genocide during World War II in which Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany, aided by its collaborators, systematically murdered some six million European Jews, around two-thirds of the Jewish population of Europe. From 1941 to 1945, Germany targeted European Jewry for extermination as part of a larger event that included the persecution and murder of other groups.
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    World War II

    World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although related conflicts began earlier. It involved the vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis.
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    Harry S. Truman

    Harry S. Truman was an American statesman who served as the 33rd President of the United States, taking the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt.
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    Baby Boom

    The term "baby boom" most often refers to the post–World War II baby boom (1946–1964) when the number of annual births exceeded 2 per 100 women (or approximately 1% of the total population size). There are an estimated 78.3 million Americans who were born during this period.
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    The Cold War

    The Cold War split the temporary wartime alliance against Nazi Germany, leaving the Soviet Union and the United States as two superpowers with profound economic and political differences.
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    Korean War

    The Korean War was a war between North Korea and South Korea. The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following a series of clashes along the border
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    1950s Prosperity

    “America at this moment,” said the former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1945, “stands at the summit of the world.” During the 1950s, it was easy to see what Churchill meant. The United States was the world's strongest military power. Its economy was booming, and the fruits of this prosperity
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    Dwight D. Eisenhower

    Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower was an American Army general and statesman who served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961.
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    Warren Court

    The Warren Court was the period in the history of the Supreme Court of the United States during which Earl Warren served as Chief Justice.
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    Vietnam War

    The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia
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    John F. Kennedy

    John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy, commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963
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    Lyndon B. Johnson

    Lyndon Baines Johnson, often referred to by his initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after having served
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    Richard Nixon

    Richard Milhous Nixon was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 until 1974, when he resigned from office, the only U.S. president to do so.
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    Jimmy Carter

    James Earl Carter Jr. is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States from 1977 to 1981. He previously was the 76th governor of Georgia from 1971 to 1975, after two terms in the Georgia State Senate from 1963 to 1967.
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    Gerald Ford

    Gerald Rudolph Ford Jr. was an American politician who served as the 38th President of the United States from August 1974 to January 1977.
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    Iran Hostage Crisis

    The Iran hostage crisis was a diplomatic standoff between Iran and the United States. Fifty-two American diplomats and citizens were held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979, to January 20, 1981
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    Ronald Reagan

    Ronald Wilson Reagan was an American politician and actor who served as the 40th President of the United States from 1981 to 1989.
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    George H. W. Bush

    George Herbert Walker Bush is an American politician who served as the 41st president of the United States from 1989 to 1993. Prior to assuming the presidency, Bush was the 43rd Vice President of the United States from 1981 to 1989.
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    Persian Gulf War

    The Gulf War, codenamed Operation Desert Shield for operations leading to the buildup of troops and defense of Saudi Arabia and Operation Desert Storm in its combat phase, was a war waged by coalition
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    Bill Clinton

    William Jefferson Clinton is an American politician who served as the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Prior to the presidency, he was the Governor of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981, and again from 1983 to 1992.
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    George W. Bush

    George Walker Bush is an American politician who served as the 43rd president of the United States from 2001 to 2009. He was also the 46th governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000. Bush was born on July 6, 1946, in New Haven, Connecticut.
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    War in Afghanistan

    S. War in Afghanistan, code named Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan (2001–2014) and Operation Freedom's Sentinel (2015–present)
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    Iraq War

    The Iraq War was a protracted armed conflict that began in 2003 with the invasion of Iraq by a United States-led coalition that overthrew the government of Saddam Hussein.
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    Barack Obama

    Barack Hussein Obama II is an American politician who served as the 44th President of the United States from 2009 to 2017.