US History

Timeline created by
  • • Sherman Anti-Trust Act

    •	Sherman Anti-Trust Act
    The Sherman Antitrust Act (Sherman Act, 26 Stat. 209, 15 U.S.C. §§ 1–7) is a landmark federal statute in the history of United States antitrust law (or "competition law") passed by Congress in 1890 under the presidency of Benjamin Harrison
  • Homestead Act

    Homestead Act
    he Homestead Acts were several United States federal laws that gave an applicant ownership of land, typically called a "homestead," at no cost. In all, more than 270 million acres of public land, or nearly 10% of the total area of the U.S., was given away free to 1.6 million homesteaders
  • Transcontinental Railroad Completed (

    On May 10, 1869, a golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, signaling the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in the United States. The transcontinental railroad had long been a dream for people living in the American West.
  • • Industrialization Begins to Boom

    •	Industrialization Begins to Boom
    Ashton held that it occurred roughly between 1760 and 1830. Rapid industrialization first began in Britain, starting with mechanized spinning in the 1780s, with high rates of growth in steam power and iron production occurring after 1800.
  • Boss Tweed rise at Tammany Hall

    Image result for Boss Tweed rise at Tammany Hall
    William Magear Tweed (April 3, 1823 – April 12, 1878)—often erroneously referred to as "William Marcy Tweed" (see below), and widely known as "Boss" Tweed—was an American politician most notable for being the "boss" of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th ...
  • • Telephone Invented

    A telephone, or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly.
  • Gilded Age

    The term for this period came into use in the 1920s and 1930s and was derived from writer Mark Twain's 1873 novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, which satirized an era of serious social problems masked by a thin gold gilding.
  • Reconstruction Ends

    With the compromise, the Republicans had quietly given up their fight for racial equality and blacks' rights in the south. In 1877, Hayes withdrew the last federal troops from the south, and the bayonet-backed Republican governments collapsed, thereby ending
  • Light Bulb Invented

    An incandescent light bulb, incandescent lamp or incandescent light globe is an electric light with a wire filament heated to such a high temperature that it glows with visible light.
  • • 3rd Wave of Immigration

    North Carolina is a new immigrant destination state. The third major wave of immigration has significantly impacted the state's population. Beginning in 1965 and intensifying in 1990, more than 44 million immigrants have arrived in the United States during the current wave.
  • • Chinese Exclusion Act (

    It was the first significant law restricting immigration into the United States. In the spring of 1882, the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed by Congress and signed by President Chester A. Arthur. This act provided an absolute 10-year moratorium on Chinese labor immigration.
  • • Pendleton Act

    The Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act (ch. 27, 22 Stat. 403) is a United States federal law, enacted in 1883, which established that positions within the federal government should be awarded on the basis of merit instead of political affiliation.
  • Dawes Act

    The Dawes Act of 1887, adopted by Congress in 1887, authorized the President of the United States to survey American Indian tribal land and divide it into allotments for individual Indians
  • • Interstate Commerce Act

    The Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 is a United States federal law that was designed to regulate the railroad industry, particularly its monopolistic practices. The Act required that railroad rates be "reasonable and just," but did not empower the government to fix specific rates.
  • • Andrew Carnegie’s Gospel of Wealth

    "Wealth", more commonly known as "The Gospel of Wealth", is an article written by Andrew Carnegie in June of 1889 that describes the responsibility of philanthropy by the new upper class of self-made rich.
  • • Klondike Gold Rush

    The Klondike Gold Rush was a migration by an estimated 100,000 prospectors to the Klondike region of the Yukon in north-western Canada between 1896 and 1899.
  • • Homestead Steel Labor Strike

    The Homestead strike, also known as the Homestead Steel strike, Pinkerton rebellion, or Homestead massacre, was an industrial lockout and strike which began on June 30, 1892, culminating in a battle
  • • Pullman Labor Strike

    The Pullman Strike was a nationwide railroad strike in the United States on May 11, 1894, and a turning point for US labor law. It pitted the American Railway Union (ARU) against the Pullman Company, the main railroads, and the federal government of the United States under President Grover Cleveland
  • w• Model-T

    w•	Model-T
    The Ford Model T is an automobile produced by Ford Motor Company from October 1, 1908, to May 26, 1927. It is generally regarded as the first affordable automobile, the car that opened travel to the common middle-class American; some of this was because of Ford's efficient fabrication, including assembly line production ...
  • Timespan World war

    Timespan World war
    World War I (WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.
  • Assissination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

    Assissination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
    The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, occurred on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo when they were mortally wounded by Gavrilo Princip.
  • • Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns

    •	Trench Warfare, Poison Gas, and Machine Guns
    Chemical warfare first appeared when the Germans used poison gas during a surprise attack in Flanders, Belgium, in 1915. At first, gas was just released from large cylinders and carried by the wind into nearby enemy lines. Later, phosgene and other gases were loaded into artillery shells and shot into enemy trenches.
  • • Sinking of the Lusitania

    •	Sinking of the Lusitania
    The sinking of the Cunard ocean liner RMS Lusitania occurred on Friday, 7 May 1915 during the First World War, as Germany waged submarine warfare against the United Kingdom which had implemented a naval blockade of Germany. The ship was identified and torpedoed by the German U-boat U-20 and sank in 18 minutes.
  • • Zimmerman Telegram

    •	Zimmerman Telegram
    The Zimmermann Telegram (or Zimmermann Note or Zimmerman Cable) was a secret diplomatic communication issued from the German Foreign Office in January 1917 that proposed a military alliance between Germany and Mexico in the prior event of the United States entering World War I against Germany.
  • • Russian Revolution

    •	Russian Revolution
    The Russian Revolution was a pair of revolutions in Russia in 1917 which dismantled the Tsarist autocracy and led to the rise of the Soviet Union.
  • • U.S. entry into WWI

    •	U.S. entry into WWI
    U.S. Entry into World War I, 1917. On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson went before a joint session of Congress to request a declaration of war against Germany. ... The United States later declared war on German ally Austria-Hungary on December 7, 1917
  • • Battle of Argonne Forest

    •	Battle of Argonne Forest
    The Meuse-Argonne Offensive, also known as the Maas-Argonne Offensive and the Battle of the Argonne Forest, was a major part of the final Allied offensive of World War I that stretched along the entire Western Front. It was fought from 26 September 1918 until the Armistice of 11 November 1918, a total of 47 days. The Meuse-Argonne Offensive w…
  • Roaring Twenties

    The Roaring Twenties was the period of Western society and Western culture that occurred during and around the
  • • President Harding’s Return to Normalcy

    Return to normalcy, a return to the way of life before World War I, was United States presidential candidate Warren G. Harding's campaign slogan for the election of 1920.
  • • Harlem Renaissance

    The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanning the 1920s. During the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement", named after the 1925 anthology
  • Mein Kamni

    Mein Kamni
    In the 1920s, Adolf Hitler began writing about Lebensraum, but he changed the meaning of the term. In his book Mein Kampf, Hitler wrote that Lebensraum was not simply about getting land but also about exterminating inferior races and guaranteeing the rise of the German master race. In 1926, a popular novel
  • Scopes monkey

    The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in July 1925 in which a substitute high ..
  • Great Depression

    Great Depression
    The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, originating in the United States
  • • Hoovervilles

    A "Hooverville" was a shanty town built during the Great Depression by the homeless in the United States of America. They were named after Herbert Hoover, who was President of the United States of America during the onset of the Depression and was widely blamed for it.
  • • Smoot-Hawley Tariff

    –Hawley Tariff or Hawley–Smoot Tariff, was an act implementing protectionist trade policies sponsored by Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis C. Hawley and signed into law on June 17, 1930. The act raised U.S. tariffs on over 20,000 imported goods.
  • • 100, 000 Banks Have Failed

    As the economic depression deepened in the early 30s, and as farmers had less and less money to spend in town, banks began to fail at alarming rates. During the 20s, there ... But others have looked at fundamental economic factors and regional histories and argued that banks failed as a result of the economic collapse.
  • The Holocaust

    The Holocaust
    The Holocaust, also referred to as the Shoah, was a genocide during World War II in which Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany, aided by its collaborators, systematically murdered some six million European Jews,
  • hitler appoined chancellor of germany

    On this day in 1933, President Paul von Hindenburg names Adolf Hitler, leader or fÜhrer of the National Socialist German Workers Party (or Nazi Party), as chancellor of Germany.
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt, commonly known as FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.
  • New Deal Programs

    1933 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) ...
    1933 Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) ...
    1933 Public Works Administration (PWA) ...
    1933 Civil Works Administration (CWA) ...
    1935 Works Progress Administration (WPA) ...
    1935 National Youth Administration (NYA) ...
    1933 Emergency Banking Relief Act (EBRA) ...
    1933 Glass-Steagall Act.
  • • Agriculture Adjustment Administration

    The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) was a United States federal law of the New Deal era designed to boost agricultural prices by reducing surpluses. The Government bought livestock for slaughter and paid farmers subsidies not to plant part of their land.
  • • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is a United States government corporation providing deposit insurance to depositors in US banks
  • • Public Works Administration

    Public Works Administration, part of the New Deal of 1933 was a large-scale public works construction agency in the United States headed by Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes
  • Dust bowl

    Dust bowl
    The Dust Bowl, also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the American and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought
  • • Social Security Administration

    is a U.S. government agency created in 1935 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the SSA administers the social insurance programs in the United States. The agency covers a wide range of social security services, such as disability, retirement and survivors' benefits.
  • rape of nanjing

    rape of nanjing
    The Nanking Massacre was an episode of mass murder and mass rape committed by Japanese troops against the residents of Nanjing, then the capital of the Republic of China, during the Second Sino-Japanese War.
  • kristallinach

    Kristallnacht or Reichskristallnacht, also referred to as the Night of Broken Glass, Reichspogromnacht or simply Pogromnacht, and Novemberpogrome, was a pogrom against Jews throughout Nazi Germany
  • World War 2

    World War 2
    World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although related conflicts began earlier.
  • hitler invades poland

    hitler invades poland
    Hitler had already issued orders to prepare for a possible "solution of the Polish problem by military means" through the Case White scenario. In May 1939, in a statement to his generals while they were in the midst of planning the invasion of Poland,
  • World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although related conflicts began earlier.

    World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although related conflicts began earlier.
    World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although related conflicts began earlier.
  • pearl habor

    pearl habor
    The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory, on the morning
  • Tuskegee Airmen

    Tuskegee Airmen
    is the popular name of a group of African-American military pilots who fought in World War II. Formally, they formed the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group of the United States Army Air Forces
  • Navajo Code Talkers

    Navajo Code Talkers
    are people in the 20th century who used obscure languages as a means of secret communication during wartime. The term is now usually associated with the United States soldiers during the world wars who used their knowledge of Native American languages as a basis to transmit coded messages
  • Executive Order 9066

    Executive Order 9066
    is a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by the United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942, authorizing the Secretary of War to prescribe certain areas as military zones. Eventually, EO 9066 cleared the way for the deportation of Japanese Americans, Italian Americans, and German Americans to internment camps
  • Bataan death march

    Bataan death march
    The Bataan Memorial Death March is a challenging march through the high desert terrain of White Sands Missile Range, conducted in honor of the heroic service members who defended the Philippine Islands during World War II, sacrificing their freedom, health and, in many cases, their very lives
  • invasion of normandy

    invasion of normandy
    The Invasion of Normandy was the invasion by and establishment of Western Allied forces in Normandy, during Operation Overlord in 1944 during World War II; the largest amphibious invasion to ever take place. D-Day, the day of the initial assaults, was Tuesday 6 June 1944.
  • Harry's truman

    Harry's truman
    was an American politician who served as the 33rd President of the United States (1945–53), assuming the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt during the waning months of World War II.
  • atomic bombing of nagasaki and hiroshima

    atomic bombing of nagasaki and hiroshima
    The bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. On August 6, 1945 the US dropped an atomic bomb ("Little Boy") on Hiroshima in Japan. Three days later a second atomic bomb ("Fat Man") was dropped on the city of Nagasaki. These were the only times nuclear weapons have been used in war.
  • victory over japan pacific

    victory over japan pacific
    Victory over Japan Day is the day on which Imperial Japan surrendered in World War II, in effect ending the war. The term has been applied to both of the days on which the initial announcement of Japan's surrender was made – to the afternoon of August 15, 1945,
  • liberation of concentration camps

    liberation of concentration camps
    Liberation of Buchenwald Concentration Camp American soldiers at the Buchenwald gatehouse, April 1945 The Buchenwald concentration camp was liberated on April 11, 1945 by four soldiers in the Sixth Armored Division of the US Third Army, commanded by General George S. Patton
  • victory in europe

    victory in europe
    War II of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces. It thus marked the end of World War II in Europe.
  • United Nations

    The United Nations is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order
  • Germany Divided

    a republic in central Europe: after World War II divided into four zones, British, French, U.S., and Soviet, and in 1949 into East Germany and West Germany; East and West Germany were reunited in 1990. 137,852 sq. mi. (357,039 sq. km). Capital: Berlin.
  • nuremberg trials

    nuremberg trials
    were a series of military tribunals, convened in the months after World War II to dispense justice to war criminals. The trials were designed to prosecute and bring to justice the most prominent political, economic and military leaders of the Nazi party
  • The Cold War

    The Cold War was a state of geopolitical tension after World War II between powers in the Eastern Bloc and powers in the Western Bloc.
  • Truman Doctrine

    The Truman Doctrine was an American foreign policy whose stated purpose was to counter Soviet geopolitical expansion during the Cold War. It was first announced to Congress by President Harry S. Truman on March 12, 1947 and further developed on July 12, 1948 when he pledged to contain threats to Greece and Turkey.
  • 22nd Amendment

    The Twenty-second Amendment of the United States Constitution limits the number of times one can be elected to the office of President of the United States.
  • Marshall Plan

    The Marshall Plan was an American initiative to aid Western Europe, in which the United States gave over $13 billion in economic assistance to help rebuild Western European economies after the end of World War II.
  • Berlin Airlift

    The Berlin Blockade was one of the first major international crises of the Cold War. During the multinational occupation of post–World War II Germany, the Soviet Union blocked the Western Allies
  • Nato Formed

    an organization formed in Washington, D.C. (1949), comprising the 12 nations of the Atlantic Pact together with Greece, Turkey, and the Federal Republic of Germany, for the purpose of collective defense against aggression
  • Korean War

    The Korean War was a war between North Korea and South Korea. The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following a series of clashes along the border
  • Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Execution

    Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, a married couple convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage in 1951, are put to death in the electric chair. The execution marked the dramatic finale of the most controversial espionage
  • Warsaw Pact Formed

    A military alliance of communist nations in eastern Europe. Organized in 1955 in answer to NATO, the Warsaw Pact included Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and the Soviet Union
  • Sputnik

  • Rodney King

    Rodney Glen King was an African-American taxi driver who became known internationally as the victim of Los Angeles Police Department brutality, after a videotape was released of several police officers beating him during his arrest on March 3, 1991.
  • : Bill Clinton

    William Jefferson Clinton is an American politician who served as the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Prior to the presidency, he was the Governor of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981
  • Contract with America

    The 1994 elections resulted in Republicans gaining 54 House and 9 U.S. Senate seats. When the Republicans gained this majority of seats in the 104th Congress, the Contract was seen as a triumph by party leaders such as Minority Whip Newt Gingrich, Dick Armey, and the American conservative movement in general.
  • O.J. Simpson’s “Trial of the Century

    The O. J. Simpson murder case was a criminal trial held at the Los Angeles County Superior Court in which former National Football League (NFL) player, broadcaster, and actor Orenthal James "O. J." Simpson was tried on two counts of murder for the June 12, 1994, deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson
  • Bill Clinton’s Impeachment

    The impeachment process of Bill Clinton was initiated by the House of Representatives on December 19, 1998, against Bill Clinton, the 42nd President
  • George W. Bush

    George W. Bush
    is an American politician who served as the 43rd president of the United States from 2001 to 2009. He was also the 46th governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000. Bush was born on July 6, 1946, in New Haven, Connecticut. After graduating from Yale University in 1968 and Harvard ...
  • • USA Patriot Act

    •	USA Patriot Act
    The USA PATRIOT Act is an Act of Congress that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001. With its ten-letter abbreviation (USA PATRIOT) expanded, the full title is “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001”.
  • • 9/11

    •	9/11
    The September 11 attacks (also referred to as 9/11) were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks killed 2,996 people, injured over 6,000 others, and caused at least $10 billion in infrastructure
  • • War on Terror

    •	War on Terror
    The War on Terror, also known as the Global War on Terrorism, is an international military campaign that was launched by the U.S. government after the September 11 attacks in the U.S. in 2001.
  • War in Afghanistan

    War in Afghanistan
    There was a lot of international pressure on the Afghan leaders to hand over Osama Bin Laden. When the Taliban didn't do this, the United States decided they would use their armed forces. In October 2001, the USA began bombing Afghanistan. They targeted bin Laden's al-Qaeda fighters and also the Taliban.
  • Iraq War

    Iraq War
    The Iraq War was a protracted armed conflict that began in 2003 with the invasion of Iraq by a United States-led coalition that overthrew the government of Saddam Hussein. ... Iraqi forces were quickly overwhelmed as U.S. forces swept through the country.
  • • NASA Mars Rover Mission Begins

    •	NASA Mars Rover Mission Begins
    NASA's twin robot geologists, the Mars Exploration Rovers, launched toward Mars on June 10 and July 7, 2003, in search of answers about the history of water on Mars. They landed on Mars January 3 and January 24 PST, 2004 (January 4 and January 25 UTC, 2004). The Mars Exploration Rover mission is part of NASA's ...
  • Facebbok

    Facebook is an American online social media and social networking service company based in Menlo Park,
  • • Hurricane Katrina

    •	Hurricane Katrina
    Hurricane Katrina was an extremely destructive and deadly tropical cyclone that is tied with Hurricane Harvey of 2017 as the costliest tropical cyclone on record.
  • • Saddam Hussein Executed

    •	Saddam Hussein Executed
    The execution of Saddam Hussein took place on Saturday, 30 December 2006. Saddam was sentenced to death by hanging, after being convicted of crimes against humanity by the Iraqi Special Tribunal for the murder of 148 Iraqi Shi'ites in the town of Dujail in 1982, in retaliation for an assassination attempt against him.
  • • Iphone Released

    •	Iphone Released
    Phone (/ˈaɪfoʊn/ EYE-fohn) is a line of smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. They run Apple's iOS mobile operating system. The first-generation iPhone was released on June 29, 2007, and there have been multiple new hardware iterations with new iOS releases since
  • : Barack Obama

    : Barack Obama
    Barack Hussein Obama II is an American politician who served as the 44th President of the United States from 2009 to 2017. The first African American to assume the presidency, he was previously the junior United States Senator from Illinois from 2005 to 2008. He served in the Illinois State Senate from 1997 until 2004.
  • • American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    •	American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009
    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Pub.L. 111–5), nicknamed the Recovery Act, was a stimulus package enacted by the 111th U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama in February 2009.
  • • Hilary Clinton Appointed U.S. Secretary of State

    •	Hilary Clinton Appointed U.S. Secretary of State
    Hillary Clinton served as the 67th United States Secretary of State, under President Barack Obama, from 2009 to 2013, overseeing the department that conducted the Foreign policy of Barack Obama. She was preceded in office by Condoleezza Rice, and succeeded by John Kerry. She is also the only former
  • • Sonia Sotomayor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court

    •	Sonia Sotomayor Appointed to U.S. Supreme Court
    In May 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Sotomayor to the Supreme Court following the retirement of Justice David Souter. Her nomination was confirmed by the Senate in August 2009 by a vote of 68–31.
  • • Arab Spring

    •	Arab Spring
    The series of protests and demonstrations across the Middle East and North Africa that commenced in 2010, became known as the "Arab Spring", and sometimes as the "Arab Spring and Winter", "Arab Awakening" or "Arab Uprisings" even though not all the participants in the protests were Arab
  • • Osama Bin Laden Killed

    •	Osama Bin Laden Killed
    Here are some facts about the death of Osama bin Laden. On May 2, 2011, Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is killed by US Special Forces during an early morning (approximately mid-afternoon on May 1 in the United States) raid in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Facts: Some facts about the compound:
  • • Space X Falcon 9

    •	Space X Falcon 9
    Falcon 9 is a two-stage rocket designed and manufactured by SpaceX for the reliable and safe transport of satellites and the Dragon spacecraft into orbit. Falcon 9 is the first orbital class rocket capable of reflight. SpaceX believes rocket reusability is the key breakthrough needed to reduce the cost of access to space
  • • Donald Trump Elected President

    •	Donald Trump Elected President
    Donald Trump. Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017. Before entering politics, he was a businessman and television personality.